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Author Topic: Sayings and their meanings.  (Read 17244 times)

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Offline CDP

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Re: Sayings and their meanings.
« Reply #63 on: January 27, 2016, 14:33:37 »
When I worked in Sheerness Dockyard a " Rabbit " was a personal job that you would work on to take home if you could and obviously hide when the bosses were around .
The solution to every problem is a.) time , or  b.) another problem.

Offline conan

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Re: Sayings and their meanings.
« Reply #62 on: January 27, 2016, 14:28:34 »
To remain ignorant of what happened before you were born is to remain a child......Cicero

Offline Signals99

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Re: Sayings and their meanings.
« Reply #61 on: January 27, 2016, 09:01:34 »
Scran; I think this word emanated from the Kent pits,Tilmanstone ,Betteshanger area, again I was told it was a term of Cornish origin, many Cornish miners worked there in the early days.Food eaten underground was always known as scran or snap, it was mostly contained in a tin about the size of the average lunch box. The tin had one end rounded and the other end had a belt attachment .Again legend has it the name 'snap' came from the sound made by the tin on opening it.

Offline peterchall

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Re: Sayings and their meanings.
« Reply #60 on: January 27, 2016, 08:21:16 »
“Rabbiting on”, meaning talking incessantly, is another use of the word that I had forgotten. I think a ‘rabbit job’ is local but I was not aware of the term’s origin, and Signal99’s explanation seems to fit.

That reminds me of another term that I believe might be local – “scran” for packed lunch (the spellchecker does not recognise it!). I remember saying when I worked  at Gravesend College that I was going to have my ‘scran’ and my colleagues, one Welsh and one Cornish, didn’t know what I meant.
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Offline conan

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Re: Sayings and their meanings.
« Reply #59 on: January 26, 2016, 23:52:14 »
Regarding rabbit job I found a reference to 'rabbit and pork' cockney rhyming slang
 for work from the 1950s.

http://www.peevish.co.uk/slang/r.htm

I must admit,however that the phrase is one that is new to me,so if it is a purely local saying then Signals99 is quite likely correct
To remain ignorant of what happened before you were born is to remain a child......Cicero

Offline Signals99

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Re: Sayings and their meanings.
« Reply #58 on: January 26, 2016, 22:55:25 »
One explanation for the term rabbit job was that in the early days of Chatham yard St Mary's island was infested by rabbits,,some workers supplemented there food supply by catching them,thus any time not spent in legitimate work was referred to as rabbit time or job. This was one explanation I recall hearing when I worked in the yard.

Offline peterchall

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Re: Sayings and their meanings.
« Reply #57 on: January 26, 2016, 20:20:16 »
Thanks Conan. Your first link has reminded me of one of my wife’s favourites if anyone says they’ve done something clever –.“I suppose you think you’re the cat’s pyjamas”.

Here's another - why is any job done for youself in the boss's time or using the firm's materials a 'Rabbit Job'?
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Offline conan

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Re: Sayings and their meanings.
« Reply #56 on: January 26, 2016, 19:00:38 »
Clue in today's Telegraph crossword: "Excellent thing". Answer: "The bee's knees". Why those? Why not the bird's wing or the crocodile's tail?

While on the theme of animals, why do we talk the hind leg off a donkey? Why not the neck off a giraffe?

Best I could find for the 'bees knees'

http://www.phrases.org.uk/meanings/the-bees-knees.html

As for the donkey,this seems to be the most succinct answer.

http://thatwordsite.com/2012/10/talk-the-hind-legs-off-a-donkey/
To remain ignorant of what happened before you were born is to remain a child......Cicero

Offline peterchall

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Re: Sayings and their meanings.
« Reply #55 on: January 26, 2016, 18:38:28 »
Clue in today's Telegraph crossword: "Excellent thing". Answer: "The bee's knees". Why those? Why not the bird's wing or the crocodile's tail?

While on the theme of animals, why do we talk the hind leg off a donkey? Why not the neck off a giraffe?
It's no use getting old if you don't get artful

Offline CDP

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Re: Sayings and their meanings.
« Reply #54 on: January 22, 2016, 11:29:22 »
I was an Engineer  with the P and O passenger liners circa 1949 for a very enjoyable 5 years and it was so ,The passengers always tried to book a cabin on the port side going out to Australia because it was the coolest side of the ship and vice versa  .it was true ,something to do with " follow the sun " I  think.
 As these  trips sprung for the Colonial Days the idea was not in use for too long ??? and possibly also in use long before ?
The solution to every problem is a.) time , or  b.) another problem.

Offline peterchall

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Re: Sayings and their meanings.
« Reply #53 on: January 22, 2016, 08:29:33 »
Thanks :)  It seems the most plausible.
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Offline conan

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Re: Sayings and their meanings.
« Reply #52 on: January 22, 2016, 00:12:09 »
There seems to be a horse racing connection here although it's disputed

http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/get-someone-s-goat
To remain ignorant of what happened before you were born is to remain a child......Cicero

Offline peterchall

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Re: Sayings and their meanings.
« Reply #51 on: January 21, 2016, 22:14:15 »
If somebody has an annoying or irritating habit, why do we say “It gets my goat”? Why doesn’t it get my dog or horse?
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Offline conan

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Re: Sayings and their meanings.
« Reply #50 on: January 17, 2016, 20:10:51 »
I'm sorry to say CDP that unfortunately the jury is still out on the derivation of the word posh as these links will show

http://blog.oxforddictionaries.com/2012/02/what-is-the-origin-of-posh/

http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/words/what-is-the-origin-of-the-word-posh

To remain ignorant of what happened before you were born is to remain a child......Cicero

Offline CDP

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Re: Sayings and their meanings.
« Reply #49 on: January 17, 2016, 15:30:42 »
In the 1400's a law was set forth that a man was not allowed to beat his  wife with a stick no thicker than his thumb.  Hence we have 'the rule of  thumb'

Many years ago in Scotland, a new game was invented. It was ruled  'Gentlemen Only...Ladies Forbidden'...and thus the word GOLF entered  into  the English language..

In Shakespeare's time, mattresses were secured on bed frames by  ropes. When you pulled on the ropes the mattress tightened,  making the bed firmer to sleep on. Hence the phrase.........  'goodnight, sleep tight.'

It was the accepted practice in Babylon 4,000 years ago that for a month after the wedding, the bride's father would supply his son-in-law with all the mead he could drink. Mead is a honey beer and because their calendar   was lunar based, this period was called the honey month . which we know today  as the honeymoon

In English pubs, ale is ordered by pints and quarts... So in old England, when customers got unruly, the bartender would yell at them 'Mind your pints and quarts, and settle down.'  It's where we get the phrase 'mind your P's and Q's'

 Many years ago in England, pub frequenters had a whistle baked into the rim, or handle, of their ceramic cups.  When they needed a refill, they used the  whistle to get some service.  'Wet your whistle' is the phrase inspired by this practice
.
The coolest, best , place on passenger ships going to Australia was Port Out and Starboard Home hence the word
P-O-S-H was invented
The solution to every problem is a.) time , or  b.) another problem.

 

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