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Author Topic: Chatham Royal Dockyard by Nicholas Pocock  (Read 3734 times)

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Offline Bilgerat

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"I did not say that the French will not come, I said they will not come by sea" - Lord St Vincent

Offline peterchall

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Re: Chatham Royal Dockyard by Nicholas Pocock
« Reply #4 on: December 26, 2015, 12:15:56 »
Thanks :)
It's no use getting old if you don't get artful

Offline Bilgerat

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Re: Chatham Royal Dockyard by Nicholas Pocock
« Reply #3 on: December 26, 2015, 11:38:58 »
Peterchall, thanks for your kind comments.

In answer to your questions - drydocks at the time were emptied and filled simply by the rising and falling of the tide. When the tide was out, the shipwrights built a temporary timber wall across the mouth of the dock. When the dock was to be flooded, the wall would be dismantled on the next ebb tide.

The mooring vessel is very similar in appearance to todays mooring vessels and is not related at all to today's tugs. Modern-day mooring vessels are diesel powered and earlier ones were powered by steam. The mooring vessel in the painting is, as you correctly suppose, oared. It's role, like those of today, is to place and lift mooring and other buoys. I mentioned Edward Muddle's Gillingham shipyard in particular because in 1780, he was contracted to build a 56ft mooring lighter for the Royal Dockyard at Chatham. Another one was built in 1800, some years after the painting was made.
"I did not say that the French will not come, I said they will not come by sea" - Lord St Vincent

Offline peterchall

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Re: Chatham Royal Dockyard by Nicholas Pocock
« Reply #2 on: December 26, 2015, 10:54:54 »
Thanks Bilgerat for a remarkably detailed description. Presumably steam engines were used for pumping water from the dry docks. Is a mooring vessel what we would call a tugboat today, presumably powered by oars?
It's no use getting old if you don't get artful

Offline Bilgerat

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Chatham Royal Dockyard by Nicholas Pocock
« Reply #1 on: December 26, 2015, 08:43:30 »
"I did not say that the French will not come, I said they will not come by sea" - Lord St Vincent

 

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