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Author Topic: Camps on the Chatham Lines, 18th Century  (Read 2000 times)

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Offline Bilgerat

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Re: Camps on the Chatham Lines, 18th Century
« Reply #7 on: July 03, 2016, 19:50:37 »
The party intended for Port Mahon never made it there and more than likely were redirected to Gibraltar. Port Mahon and the rest of the strategically vital island of Minorca fell to the French in June 1756 following the failure of the British fleet under the then Vice-Admiral John Byng to drive off a French invasion fleet in the Battle of Minorca.

The Battle of Minorca was the opening naval engagement of the Seven Years War (1756 - 1763) and the defeat was the reason why Admiral Byng was executed on 14th March 1757. See my article here:
http://www.kenthistoryforum.co.uk/index.php?topic=977.msg140718
"I did not say that the French will not come, I said they will not come by sea" - Lord St Vincent

Offline Leofwine

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Re: Camps on the Chatham Lines, 18th Century
« Reply #6 on: July 03, 2016, 18:06:21 »
Oxford Journal - Saturday 22 May 1756

PORT NEWS.
Chatham, May 19. A Party of Lord Charles Hay's Regiment, quartered at Brumpton and Gillingham, marched thro' this Place, on Monday last to join the rest at Gravesend and Dartford; and from thence, as it is said are to march to Portsmouth, from whence they will em-bark for Gibraltar and Mahon.
Yesterday fifty Bread Waggons arrived here, and drove up to the Top of the Hill, and are placed within the Lines, where they will lie until the Arrival of the Hanoverian Troops, which are hourly expected. The necessary Preparations are making for their Landing at the old Dock; and this Morning several of the said Waggons drove to Rochester With Flour, where Ovens are provided, and they begin baking this Day, a Number of Bakers having been sent hither two Days ago for that Purpose.

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Offline Leofwine

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Re: Camps on the Chatham Lines, 18th Century
« Reply #5 on: June 19, 2016, 22:48:34 »
Newcastle Courant - Saturday 31 July 1762
Three more Regiments, we hear, are ordered to march and encamp within the Lines at Brompton, near Chatham, with those three Regiments already there.



Newcastle Courant - Saturday 23 April 1768
We hear that a Camp will be called early this Summer at Brompton, near Chatham, for exercising the Train of Artillery, and several Regiments of Horse and Foot.




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Offline Leofwine

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Re: Camps on the Chatham Lines, 18th Century
« Reply #4 on: June 19, 2016, 21:35:29 »
Ipswich Journal 23 Sep 1758

This morning the train of artillery marched from the camp at Brompton for Woolwich. The two battalions that are now in camp will soon go into quarters.



Derby Mercury 8 June 1759

It is now believed that there will be no camp this summer at Brompton near Chatham but that the troops are to remain in quarters till the three streets of barracks are completed which are now in great forwardness.



Derby Mercury 28 Sept 1759

Yesterday the three regiments encamped at Brompton viz General Bocklands Lord Robert Manners and Lord Loudons were reviewed by Lord Ligonier accompanied by Generals Campell, Conway and Lord Effingham and many other officers After the review a mock fight was acted  when the works were assaulted and the besiegers made advances as far as the glacis but were at length  (by terrible fire from the ramparts) obliged to retreat and the garrison sallying out took their cannon and drove them into the woods and hedges but like generous English soldiers gave every man quarter for their was no loss on either side.


Derby Mercury 26 June 1761

On Wednesday last two field pieces and several artillery wagons joined the camp at Brompton and General Kingsley arrived at Hill House.



Oxford Journal - Saturday 9 May 1778

Part of the Kentish and all the Surry Militia, in Case of a War, are to form a Camp with some Companies of the regular Troops at Brompton-Common, near Chatham.




Ipswich Journal 7 Oct 1780

On Monday morning about 12 o clock Lord Amherst, General Amherst, Col Debbeig and Col Townsend and several other officers of distinction arrived at Chatham. After visiting the barracks his lordship proceeded to the new magazine and passed along the lines to the redoubts and then reviewed the Westminster regiment of militia encamped at Brompton. From thence he returned to the Mitre inn at Chatham where all the field officers of the garrison dined with his lordship. The next morning the East Essex and East Suffolk regiments of militia were reviewed by Lord Amherst without the lines at Chatham and made a handsome appearance. He then revisited the barracks



Derby Mercury - Thursday 26 July 1781

Wednesday the four Regiments, encamped at Chatham, viz, the fifty-fifth Regiment, the Westminster Division of the Middlesex, East Suffolk, and second Regiment of the Yorkshire Militias, were under Arms, upon Brompton Common, at Nine o'Clock in the Morning, and performed their several Manoeuvres in review before Lord Amherst, attended by General Calcraft (who commands at Chatham Camp) General Gage, and other Officers. His Lordship ex- pressed his Approbation of the Appearance and Discipline of the Troops. We are informed, that Recruits came into Chatham every Day; the Barracks are now full of them. About 2000 of them were under Arms on Tuesday ; these are not yet drafted to Regiments, and are employed in constructing several Batteries and Fortifications on the Common, some of which command the Sea, and others are intended as Forts to retreat to; some of these are in great fowardness, and have their Artillery mounted.



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Offline Leofwine

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Re: Camps on the Chatham Lines, 18th Century
« Reply #3 on: June 19, 2016, 21:25:15 »
Derby Mercury 4 July 1760

Yesterday five companies of the 9th regiment of foot commanded by General Whitmore came into Rochester. This day the remainder came in and encamped in the Lines at Brompton and last night General Carr arrived at Hill House to take command of the camp.
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Offline Leofwine

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Re: Camps on the Chatham Lines, 18th Century
« Reply #2 on: June 19, 2016, 20:37:27 »
Caledonian Mercury - Saturday 07 June 1760
We hear that five camps are already set- tled for this summer, viz. one at Winchester; one at Sand hear, Surry; one at Brentwood, Essex; another at or near the Lines, near Brompton ; and one at Barnham Downs, the two last are in Kent. 
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Offline Leofwine

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Camps on the Chatham Lines, 18th Century
« Reply #1 on: June 19, 2016, 19:44:24 »
Derby Mercury - Friday 28 May 1756

COUNTRY NEWS.
Chatham, May 21. This Day several Regiments of Hanoverians marched through this Place in their Way to Maidstone, near which they are to encamp.
Next Week 4 or 5000 English Troops are expected to encamp within the Lines at Brompton, near this Place.



Derby Mercury 18 June 1756

June 17 this morning early Gen Stewarts regiment marched out of the town (Chatham) and encamped within the lines beyond Brompton Loudons regiment from Croydon came here and encamped likewise and several more regiments are expected.



Derby Mercury - Friday 16 July 1756

On Wednesday the Hanoverian Troops encamped at Brompton, near Chatham.


Manchester Mercury - Tuesday 09 May 1758
We hear that in a few Days a Camp will formed on Brompton Heath near Chatham, on the same Ground on which the last Camp was.
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