News:
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Author Topic: St. James, Bicknor  (Read 4829 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Bryn Clinch

  • Established Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 935
  • Appreciation 72
Re: St. James, Bicknor
« Reply #10 on: July 23, 2016, 18:45:58 »
The Norman Knight! The inscription on the coffin lid is not a cross but a large sword.

Offline Bryn Clinch

  • Established Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 935
  • Appreciation 72
Re: St. James, Bicknor
« Reply #9 on: July 05, 2016, 19:04:51 »
Do you mean within the base of the tower 'two walls 4 feet apart, forming an alcove', as when I was last up there, about 10 years ago, there was a medieval stone coffin lid on the floor in the base of the tower?
Yes, that`s the one CAT! I forgot to mention that it was in the base of the tower. One of the ladies at the church seemed to think that there was an inscription but it was too dark to see - I`ll take a torch next time I go - hopefully next Monday.

Offline CAT

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 132
  • Appreciation 12
Re: St. James, Bicknor
« Reply #8 on: July 05, 2016, 15:04:34 »
Do you mean within the base of the tower 'two walls 4 feet apart, forming an alcove', as when I was last up there, about 10 years ago, there was a medieval stone coffin lid on the floor in the base of the tower? Can't remember seeing any inscription, most don't, but may have the remains of a floriated cross on a shaft over a stepped base in base relief on its upper surface. Their was another found in the church yard immediately to the west of the south porch. This was much shorter than normal, not due to it being for a child, and had been largely covered by soil for some time. I did fully expose it at the time and it was suggested it may go inside, where it originally came from, but I don't know whether this happened. Either way, that possessed its cross, shaft with sprouting leaves and stepped base, all in fairly good condition considering it was over eight hundred years old?

Offline Bryn Clinch

  • Established Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 935
  • Appreciation 72
Re: St. James, Bicknor
« Reply #7 on: July 05, 2016, 09:33:28 »
Yes I did notice (I was shown by the churchwarden), two walls, about 4ft apart, which were built of different materials. On the floor and between the two walls, (which created an alcove), was a weather-beaten tombstone which had obviously been outside the church at one time, but was enclosed within the church by an addition to the building. It was impossible to read any inscription on the stone as it was too dark. I`ll be re-visiting at a later date to take a photo and to find out if there is any inscription.
I have a few ancestors interred in the churchyard - but I have no idea who they are. My Grandfather (born 1880) didn`t know either, but nearly all the Clinch family originated around the Borden, Bredgar, Tunstall and Stockbury areas.

Offline CAT

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 132
  • Appreciation 12
Re: St. James, Bicknor
« Reply #6 on: July 05, 2016, 08:25:38 »
It is an unusual little church. Did you notice the rare side of this church's construction that its interior is entirely of chalk blocks? Originally constructed in the early Norman period (see the blocked doorway made of a stone type called Tufa), the chalk interior had suffered by the mid nineteenth-century when an ambitious scheme of restoration caused the roof to be removed. This happened during one of the coldest winters of the century (1861) causing the chalk block work to 'crumble before the eyes of the masons'. The workforce tried in vain to save the interior by draping the wall tops with straw and hessian and lighting braziers inside the nave and chancel to raise the temperature, but to no avail. Sadly the interior could not be saved, but instead was largely replaced with new chalk blocks, the extra cost of which nearly bankrupted the architect (G. F. Bodley) and the parish. During a major scheme of renovation/repair to the church in 2006 several original Norman chalk blocks were rediscovered and retained as best could be.   

Offline Bryn Clinch

  • Established Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 935
  • Appreciation 72
Re: St. James, Bicknor
« Reply #5 on: July 05, 2016, 07:20:22 »
Well done Bryn Clinch, nice to see you are able to get out and about again.  :)
Thanks for your good wishes, granderog. It`s a great relief to get out again - I thought I was "finished" at one stage. The DVLA took many weeks to OK me for driving again.

Offline grandarog

  • Established Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1070
  • Appreciation 101
  • RAF Halton 1957-1960
Re: St. James, Bicknor
« Reply #4 on: July 04, 2016, 22:22:59 »
Well done Bryn Clinch, nice to see you are able to get out and about again.  :)

Offline Lyn L

  • Established Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1127
  • Appreciation 84
Re: St. James, Bicknor
« Reply #3 on: July 04, 2016, 22:02:56 »
Lovely pics and the shoes are nice too  :)
Half our life is spent trying to find something to do with the time we have rushed through life tryi

Offline Bryn Clinch

  • Established Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 935
  • Appreciation 72
Re: St. James, Bicknor
« Reply #2 on: July 04, 2016, 19:52:37 »
. . . . and a few more . . . .
the third one is on the right hand edge of the reredos.

Offline Bryn Clinch

  • Established Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 935
  • Appreciation 72
St. James, Bicknor
« Reply #1 on: July 04, 2016, 19:48:00 »
This lonely little church is now open to visitors on Mondays, from 12 midday to 4 pm during the summer months. No electricity, gas or water supply. Steeped in history and well worth a visit.

There is a Victorian under-floor heating system which I believe has never worked. (3 photos) using a very small fireplace in the Vestry. There are quite a number of `vents` in the floor which, I guess, emitted more smoke than heat.

The Font, which is one of a pair, (its twin was in St. Margaret, Hucking but now housed in the Faversham Museum.)

The very ancient blocked west door, of which there is no trace from the interior.(1 photo)

The exceptionally intricate Italian alabaster Reredos (1 photo) with an inscription on the right hand side (1 photo)
.
Two `heads` high up in the north aisle, one at the east end the other at the west end, where the Saxons sat as they were not allowed in the nave which was reserved for the Normans.

Sorry about the shoes!

Edit. 09/08/16:  The last one shows the source of heat for the `underfloor central heating`, in the vestry, a very small fireplace between the bench and the table leg, covered by a circular metal plate.




 

BloQcs design by Bloc
SMF 2.0.11 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines