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Author Topic: St. James, Bicknor  (Read 2853 times)

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Offline Bryn Clinch

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Re: St. James, Bicknor
« Reply #25 on: Yesterday at 16:00:48 »
On Sunday, 18th June, 2017 there is an Arts and Crafts Fair at St. James, 11.00  -  16.00.



Offline Bryn Clinch

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Re: St. James, Bicknor
« Reply #24 on: May 19, 2017, 10:18:35 »
My Grt. Grandfather died at the early age of 48 and is interred in Tunstall churchyard.

Offline Maid of Kent

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Re: St. James, Bicknor
« Reply #23 on: May 18, 2017, 22:09:34 »
Was looking for something else when I found Bryn Clinch's ref to this church mentioning he had family relatives here - there were loads of Clinches in the area Stockbury, Bexton etc to which I am related through a 3times Gt Grandma - so perhaps we are related in the dim past!. My Uncle kept in contact with several of them until his death in 1987.

Offline CAT

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Re: St. James, Bicknor
« Reply #22 on: October 12, 2016, 18:45:40 »
That's the one. Might not be in its original position as they are meant to be an internal memorial, but not bad for 800 years old?

Offline Bryn Clinch

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Re: St. James, Bicknor
« Reply #21 on: October 12, 2016, 16:40:58 »
Another shot taken yesterday, POSSIBLY a little clearer than the previous one at #18 ?

Offline Bryn Clinch

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Re: St. James, Bicknor
« Reply #20 on: October 06, 2016, 16:34:09 »
Many thanks for the info, CAT. I`ll be making a return visit soon. I find it a fascinating place, probably as I have relatives interred there and also have connections with the former Methodist chapel, not far away.

Offline CAT

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Re: St. James, Bicknor
« Reply #19 on: October 06, 2016, 08:57:12 »
Managed to divert back to the church on my way through recently to see if the one outside shown in the photo from my previous post was still there. Gladly it was, but sadly rapidly becoming reabsorbed into the churchyard again. Its at times like this that churchyard monuments are most threatened with their upper surface just am ground level. Modern mowing of churchyards will easily plane-any inscriptions/decoration in one swoop. My first image shows its location next to the west side of the south porch, whilst the second image shows it in its current condition.

Offline CAT

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Re: St. James, Bicknor
« Reply #18 on: August 15, 2016, 09:37:24 »
After some file searching here it is. As mentioned in a previous post, this was uncovered just beneath a thin layer of topsoil that was removed to facilitate the level base for scaffolding just to the southwest of the south porch. Hopefully its still there or had been moved to the safer location? As mentioned previously, though its similar in its general design (cross on shaft on stepped base) it does possess floriated arms down its shaft and no outer moulding suggesting it was originally meant to be level with the church floor and not slightly raised above. It is also about 1.1m long, the red and white stick next to it is 500mm long. 

Offline CAT

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Re: St. James, Bicknor
« Reply #17 on: August 15, 2016, 09:05:09 »
Neither of the two you photographed are the one I uncovered. The first photo you posted is known as a 'foot' stone and would have stood at the opposite end (foot end) of the grave from the headstone. Whilst the headstone possesses the burial(s) information, name, date biblical verse etc. the footstone only marks the extent of the grave with the initial(s) of the burials and the date of death. These usually get uprooted to enable more efficient mowing and utilised as paving across/around the churchyard. It is possible that the one you photographed was to a former vicar, but the date on it looks late nineteenth-century? It could be possible to reunite the foot and the headstone (if it survives in the churchyard) by looking at the initials on the footstone and the name on the headstone. Further confirmation would be in the date of death?

The other stone you photographed could also be a broken head stone reused as paving. Whilst it may not have any inscription on the upper exposed face, these were sometime laid face (inscription) down so as not to offend those walking on them.

I have a pic somewhere of the thirteenth-century coffin lid that was exposed close to the porch when working there. I'll hunt it out and if successful will post it?

Offline Bryn Clinch

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Re: St. James, Bicknor
« Reply #16 on: August 13, 2016, 16:10:32 »
1.  The very small one that you mentioned CAT, only about 30" long, at the west end of the church.

2.  This broken grave stone is immediately in front of the vestry door at the east end of the church. I was told that it is the grave of a former Rector. It would be impossible to enter or exit the church without stepping on it. Hence the damage ?

Edit 12/10/2016
It appears that some repairs have taken place (see last photo)



Offline CAT

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Re: St. James, Bicknor
« Reply #15 on: August 11, 2016, 20:03:25 »
I can't claim the credit for the photo, but I have been known to store images of use in a database. Glad to hear the smaller stone survives, though that is an oddity due to its size? As I mentioned before they are assumed to be for the priests, so why the small size? It may have been a cost cutting exercise in a poor rural parish? Don't forget the church was originally built of chalk. Not the most expensive material, even in the early twelfth century.

Offline Bryn Clinch

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Re: St. James, Bicknor
« Reply #14 on: August 11, 2016, 18:29:09 »
Had a look through my collection and came up with a slightly clearer view of the same monument that clearly shows the full extent of the carving across the top of the stone beneath the tower. This shows, as is typical in this part of the country, it to be a cross, opposed to a sword, on the end of a long thin shaft stood on a stepped base. These are generally regarded as being markers to former members of the clergy and are thought to have originally been placed in the floor of the chancel. However, changes in Christian religious practices since the middle ages has meant these become a nuisance as the slab was usually raised slightly above floor level (see the quarter round moulding around the outer edge). This meant that they are often repositioned in a less awkward location (a dusty corner or outside in the churchyard), though they are frequently discarded all together and broken-up for such use as later building material (not just in churches). It is almost certain that the one under the tower was moved when the red tile floor was installed during the nineteenth-century restoration and the other smaller one discarded to the churchyard. Laying close to the south porch, I hope that one still survives?   
Great photo, CAT!  Even clearer than the original. I remember seeing a much smaller one outside the church at the west end, quite near the porch. 

Offline CAT

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Re: St. James, Bicknor
« Reply #13 on: August 09, 2016, 09:17:08 »
Had a look through my collection and came up with a slightly clearer view of the same monument that clearly shows the full extent of the carving across the top of the stone beneath the tower. This shows, as is typical in this part of the country, it to be a cross, opposed to a sword, on the end of a long thin shaft stood on a stepped base. These are generally regarded as being markers to former members of the clergy and are thought to have originally been placed in the floor of the chancel. However, changes in Christian religious practices since the middle ages has meant these become a nuisance as the slab was usually raised slightly above floor level (see the quarter round moulding around the outer edge). This meant that they are often repositioned in a less awkward location (a dusty corner or outside in the churchyard), though they are frequently discarded all together and broken-up for use as later building material (not just in churches). It is almost certain that the one under the tower was moved when the red tile floor was installed during the nineteenth-century restoration and the other smaller one discarded to the churchyard. Laying close to the south porch, I hope that one still survives?   

Offline Bryn Clinch

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Re: St. James, Bicknor
« Reply #12 on: July 29, 2016, 15:57:44 »
Didn`t manage to photo the other end, but here`s the only other one that I have.

[attachment deleted by admin]

Offline CAT

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Re: St. James, Bicknor
« Reply #11 on: July 27, 2016, 15:17:56 »
Most interesting if it was a sword on the top of the coffin lid as these are not common in this part of England. However the image is unclear away from the camera, which is where the cross should be? The portion of the lid closest to the camera looks very traditional Kentish with the cross shaft descending down the lid centre to a representation of a stepped plinth? Sometimes the shaft has a pair of projecting arms roughly halfway up it's length that can be misconstrued as the cross guard of a sword, though a good look at the top of the shaft should possess an equal armed cross of varying levels of intricacies? Did you manage to photo the other end?

 

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