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Author Topic: Shorncliffe Military Cemetery  (Read 2160 times)

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Offline Longpockets

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Re: Shorncliffe Military Cemetery
« Reply #4 on: October 16, 2016, 20:46:46 »

Cemetery Plan


Offline Longpockets

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Re: Shorncliffe Military Cemetery
« Reply #3 on: October 16, 2016, 20:42:44 »

Private John Doogan, 1853-1940, King’s Dragoon Guards.


Offline Longpockets

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Re: Shorncliffe Military Cemetery
« Reply #2 on: October 16, 2016, 20:31:53 »
Private Patrick McHale, 1826-1866, from the Royal Artillery:  1st Battalion, 5th Regiment Private Patrick M'Hale

Offline kyn

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Shorncliffe Military Cemetery
« Reply #1 on: October 14, 2016, 21:01:48 »




This cemetery is still in use by the MOD, I assume it’s use began in connection with the local Military Hospital down the hill.  There are more than 600 Commonwealth War Graves here.  471 are from WWI and will include deaths from influenza which was so common at the time.  300 of these are Canadians that were stationed in Shorncliffe.  6 members of the Chinese Labour Corps can be found here.





There are 81 burials from WWII which include an unidentified British soldier and a Polish war grave.





A screen wall lists 18 Belgian soldiers who were interred in a mausoleum here, which has since been demolished.  Photos of this building can be found online and is very impressive.













There are three Victoria Cross recipients here.

Private Patrick McHale, 1826-1866, from the Royal Artillery:  1st Battalion, 5th Regiment Private Patrick M'Hale

Date of Acts of Bravery, 2nd October and 22nd December, 1857.

For conspicuous bravery at Lucknow on the 2nd October, 1857, when he was the first man at the capture of one of the guns at the Cawnpore Battery,—and again, on the 22 December 1857, when, by a bold rush, he was the first to take possession of one of the enemy's guns, which had sent several rounds of grape through his company, which was skirmishing up to it. On every occasion of attack, Private McHale has been the first to meet the foe, amongst whom he caused such consternation by the boldness of his rush, as to leave little work for those who followed to his support. By his habitual coolness and daring, and sustained bravery in action, his name has become a household word for gallantry among his comrades.

Joseph Charles Brennan, 1818-1872, 5th Regiment of Foot.



He was about 39 years old, and a Bombardier in the Royal Regiment of Artillery, British Army during the Indian Mutiny when the following deed took place on 3 April 1858 at Jhansi, India for which he was awarded the VC:
For marked gallantry at the assault of Jhansi, on the 3rd of April 1858, in bringing up two guns of the Hyderabad Contingent, manned by Natives, lying each under a heavy fire from the walls, and directing them so accurately as to compel the Enemy to abandon his battery.



Private John Doogan, 1853-1940, King’s Dragoon Guards.

He was 27 years old, and a private in the 1st Dragoon Guards (The King's), British Army during the First Boer War when the following deed took place for which he was awarded the VC.
On 28 January 1881 at the Battle of Laing's Nek, South Africa, during the charge of the mounted men, Private Doogan saw that Major Brownlow, KDG had had his horse shot from under him and was dismounted among the Boers. Doogan rode up and, in spite of being severely wounded himself, dismounted and insisted on Major Brownlow taking his horse, receiving another wound while doing so.[1]
The officer Doogan saved, William Vasey Brownlow, ultimately rose to a Major-General and died in 1926, bequeathing Doogan, his 'former servant', an annuity of £20 a year,[2] (worth around £600 in 2005).

 

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