News: Gypsy tart originated from the Isle of Sheppey
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Author Topic: Anti Tank Blocks, Hythe  (Read 4407 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline cptpies

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 65
  • Appreciation 5
    • Extended Defence of Britain Overlay for Google Earth
Re: Anti Tank Blocks, Hythe
« Reply #8 on: October 18, 2016, 15:56:17 »
These are elements of the Coastal Crust stop line. All the roads leading to the seafront in Hythe were blocked by vertical Rail roadblocks and the pimples visible on the 1945 images continued that line to just west of the gasworks. It then becomes an Anti Tank Ditch which runs north east up to the housing just south of the Royal Military Canal. There is another short stretch of pimples visible completing the line and forming a roadblock between the houses and the canal across Dymchurch Road. The RMC then becomes the main obstacle all the way down to Pett.
Get my Defence of Britain Overlay for GE here https://www.dropbox.com/sh/v5e9iyg1n1q367r/hS4-ddBEb_

Offline conan

  • Established Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1109
  • Appreciation 78
Re: Anti Tank Blocks, Hythe
« Reply #7 on: October 17, 2016, 14:57:38 »
Cheers for the the confirmation that that was a gas holder CAT I thought by the shadow it was casting that it was.
To remain ignorant of what happened before you were born is to remain a child......Cicero

Offline CAT

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 144
  • Appreciation 13
Re: Anti Tank Blocks, Hythe
« Reply #6 on: October 17, 2016, 10:20:44 »
Could they just form part of the outer coastal defence to the sea ward part of the town? Having looked at the earlier Ordnance survey maps for the area, the 1874 shows it as part of the shingle expanse used as part of the ranges. By 1897 the town gasworks are established on the site with only a single gas holder with ancillary service buildings immediately to the west. This is the same by 1907, but by 1929 a second gas holder is installed immediately to the east of the first. It subsequently became the site of the town sewage works for a period during the second quarter of the twentieth-century.

However, the official Historic Environment Record (HER) records:

A Second World War embarkation hard located near the Lifeboat Station at Hythe (TR 157 339). This was a 4-berth hard that was built between 1942 and 1943 for landing craft transporting troops (an LCT hard) and was controlled by Dover Command. Three further embarkation hards for Dover Command were located in Deal at South Street, Granville Street and the Swimming Baths (TR 377 544), with a further one at Cambridge Road (TR 381 485), and two hards in Hythe at Stade Court and Imperial Hotel (TR 168 342). A further five sites at Dover, two sites at Hastings and one at Folkestone have not been traced.

Embarkation hards were built by the Admiralty as part of Operation Overlord to load landing vessels in preparation for D-Day and the invasion of occupied Europe. A total of 68 individual hards were constructed between 1942 and 1944 across the southern coast of England in every county between Suffolk and Cornwall.

There were two types of embarkation hards: LCT hards for landing crafts for troops and LST hards for landing ships carrying tanks. A standard hard consisted of a rectangular concrete apron that sloped down into the water, which was equipped with steel framed mooring points (known as dolphins) to moor the vessels during loading. Hard sites included access roads to link the hards to public highways, approach roads to accommodate the concentrated heavy traffic and transit areas for marshalling troops, vehicles and equipment. Accommodation and ancillary buildings at hard sites would include offices for embarkation staff; a central control room; a workshop for maintenance crew; stores; a watch hut and a latrine. Sites were also fitted with fuel, lighting and utilities.

The embarkation hard described above is visible on aerial photographs and has been mapped as part of the South East Rapid Coastal Zone Assessment Survey NMP. The embarkation hard was located near the lifeboat station at the southern end of St Leonards Road and centred at TR 15791 33912. The embarkation pier extended from TR 15795 33903 inland to TR 15817 33856 seawards. The concrete platform behind it measured 60m by 36m. The embarkation hards were subsequently removed on aerial photographs taken in 1959.'


Offline conan

  • Established Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1109
  • Appreciation 78
Re: Anti Tank Blocks, Hythe
« Reply #5 on: October 16, 2016, 20:59:05 »
The last paragraph in this Wiki link(flame barrage) points away from Hythe being involved in the fougasse system

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Petroleum_Warfare_Department#Flame_barrage
To remain ignorant of what happened before you were born is to remain a child......Cicero

Offline CAT

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 144
  • Appreciation 13
Re: Anti Tank Blocks, Hythe
« Reply #4 on: October 16, 2016, 17:45:06 »
Could the anti-tank block lines in conjunction with the circular oil? tanks be part of a coastal defence scheme where oil, phosphorus and fuel were pumped out to sea if we were to be invaded. This would enable the fuel to float with the oil and be ignited by the phosphorus in contact with the air? Evidence of a similar scheme was found both on the seafront at Deal and at Aycliffe above Dover.

Offline conan

  • Established Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1109
  • Appreciation 78
Re: Anti Tank Blocks, Hythe
« Reply #3 on: October 15, 2016, 13:00:14 »
A zoom in on the site reveals several lines of blocks around the circular structures(martello tower-gas holder? well the shadow looks like a gas holder :)) as well as lines leading up from the beach and turning 90 degrees.There also seems to a line of them centre right of photo at the bottom of the road leading to the beach.

To remain ignorant of what happened before you were born is to remain a child......Cicero

Offline Paolo

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 79
  • Appreciation 15
Re: Anti Tank Blocks, Hythe
« Reply #2 on: October 15, 2016, 09:41:51 »
Are they not fishing boats drawn upon what is known as Fisherman's Beach, currently being developed?  Note the old lifeboat house adjacent, now Griggs' fish shop.  I can discern a semicircle of what may be blocks to the left rear of the beach.  The three blocks in a line in the sea mark the old sewer outfall.

Offline kyn

  • Administrator
  • Established Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7429
  • Appreciation 422
    • Sheppey History
Anti Tank Blocks, Hythe
« Reply #1 on: October 14, 2016, 22:01:05 »
1940's image showing blocks on the beach.

 

BloQcs design by Bloc
SMF 2.0.11 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines