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Author Topic: Union Street area, Rochester  (Read 10622 times)

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Offline shoot999

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Re: Union Street area, Rochester
« Reply #56 on: April 22, 2018, 08:33:41 »
This photo from the na3t site was apparently taken at the bottom of Morden Street near a builders yard, probably just prior to redevelopment.

It is. The location can still be 'matched'  on google maps with the rear of the houses on Rochester Ave. I would guess that this is the site of the last few houses at the bottom of Morden St, and the patch of white to the left is what remains of the waste ground that housed a few sheds. The builders yard would have been behind the photographer. My playground from 55 to 63 :)

Offline smiffy

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Re: Union Street area, Rochester
« Reply #55 on: April 22, 2018, 02:32:53 »
This photo from the na3t site was apparently taken at the bottom of Morden Street near a builders yard, probably just prior to redevelopment.

Offline Signals99

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Re: Union Street area, Rochester
« Reply #54 on: December 21, 2016, 20:05:55 »
AlanH, totally agree with you. As stated previously, I lived at 9 Union Street, originally a Victorian town house. My father purchased it in 1947/48, cost about five thousand five hundred pounds. it was a grade two listed building as I recall, he even had to get permission to remove the air raid shelter from the garden.
On compulsory purchase prior to demolition, he received nine hundred pounds compensation, less than what he owed on the to the building society. I was very happy to move, got a two bedroom semi on the Tideway, hot water, two loos one up t`other down, all mod cons, I for one was not sorry to depart Union  Street, the only thing I missed was the friendships built up over many years, popping in to next door for a cup of tea and a chat, looking after each other, true friendship, all gone on the new estates, never to return.

Offline AlanH

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Re: Union Street area, Rochester
« Reply #53 on: December 20, 2016, 09:11:10 »
I'm with you there Shoot99, we moved from Baker St where they not long put in the electricity for lighting, to Cookham Wood which had all "mod cons". The pleasure of hot baths from the water heater behind the fire was wonderful.
I understand nostalgia for parts of the olden days but not those old houses with their outside toilets and having to boil water for baths.  :)
AlanH.

Offline shoot999

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Re: Union Street area, Rochester
« Reply #52 on: December 19, 2016, 19:16:23 »
Let the yuppies have them. Loved the place; but glad we went to the Tideway when we did. A big three bedroom corner plot next to the woods with a double garage. Mmmmmmmmm warm toilet seats  :)

 Not sure those that were knocked down in Troy Town were worth saving anyway. A lot smaller than those that survive in Foord St, etc. and very poorly constructed. From what I've read the poor sanitation finally did for them.

Although when I had a look round this summer they seem to have got it right in Union and Cazenueve St. But the flats in John St (what was the south side of Morden St) should have gone when they demolished the tower blocks. Very ugly and depressing.

Offline Troyboy

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Re: Union Street area, Rochester
« Reply #51 on: December 19, 2016, 19:15:35 »
Hello all, attached jpeg, with the thanks to Google Earth, shows the latest view.
Regards Troyboy

Offline CAT

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Re: Union Street area, Rochester
« Reply #50 on: December 19, 2016, 18:43:46 »
I know the house is still there, it's the painted name I'm not sure of? Troy House was one of the few buildings of the entire Troy Town, as it's referred to on earlier, to survive. Despite, going through a period of neglect and semi dereliction, if those fantastic Georgian houses that formed Troy Town had survived to the present day it would be a smart, expensive place to live? Similar scenarios happened to places in London, now the buildings are selling for millions of pounds, not to say Troy Town would fetch
those prices, but who knows?

Offline smiffy

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Re: Union Street area, Rochester
« Reply #49 on: December 19, 2016, 16:57:12 »
On every source I can find it's still there, but short of actually visiting the area I can't guarantee it. :)

Offline CAT

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Re: Union Street area, Rochester
« Reply #48 on: December 19, 2016, 15:58:38 »
Troy House is now subdivided and known as 6 to 10 East Row. Falling on the corner of East Row and Union Street, it was originally built as a single large double fronted property, which is known to have possessed a large coach house and stables to the rear accessed from Union Street. On GSV you can still read 'Troy House' painted in black on the white lintel of the front door. Whether it is still there ???

Offline smiler

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Re: Union Street area, Rochester
« Reply #47 on: December 19, 2016, 15:00:14 »
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Re: Union Street area, Rochester
« Reply #39 on: December 13, 2016, 17:33:33 »

    Quote

Interesting information there, CAT - I was wondering how Cazeneuve Street got its name. Troy house is one of the few places in the area that have survived.


http://www.kenthistoryforum.co.uk/index.php?topic=19520.30
    I to my knowledge have never heard of Troy House could you explain where it is please.

Offline Signals99

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Re: Union Street area, Rochester
« Reply #46 on: December 14, 2016, 23:49:23 »
Cat, what a well rounded and informative publication, very comprehensive, thank you, look forward to further blogs from you.

Offline Dave Smith

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Re: Union Street area, Rochester
« Reply #45 on: December 14, 2016, 12:56:17 »
Most interesting CAT, I've often wondered- thanks.

Offline CAT

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Re: Union Street area, Rochester
« Reply #44 on: December 14, 2016, 08:53:27 »
In regards to the 'blocked windows' aspect of the houses that originally stood in the area, it must be remembered what period these houses were constructed. Whilst houses from the pre-seventeenth-century did succumb to the various window taxes of the mid - late seventeenth-century, the renewed delight in classical architecture through the later seventeenth - and into the early nineteenth-centuries meant that large numbers of housing were constructed with elements of symmetry in their facades. This meant that the lay out of window openings failed to match the internal 'practical' arrangements of the room layouts. This meant that large numbers of 'windows' were required to be 'blind windows' (technical term) and were frequently plastered and painted with the white frame arrangements of the real windows adjacent with the 'glass' area painted dark, often black to make the façade to conform.

In architectural terms this scheme of making the symmetry of a façade dominate the design is referred to as 'form over function', whilst by the mid - late nineteenth-century, with the revival in gothic architecture, with notable architects as A. W. N. Pugin, all changed. With this scheme of architecture the room function and internal layout dominated the design with the external window arrangements and the overall external design of the property being under a new scheme of 'function over form'.

Whilst this is a fairly simple explanation, I hope it provides a reason as to the 'blocked' windows, which are largely not blocked but a design feature of a specific period? However, the inclusion of this feature in modern developments is largely to aid in appeasing modern conservation planning constraints.

     

Offline smiffy

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Re: Union Street area, Rochester
« Reply #43 on: December 13, 2016, 20:42:13 »
It looks like a lot of the new build is at least trying to fit in with the area, which makes a nice change.

Offline shoot999

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Re: Union Street area, Rochester
« Reply #42 on: December 13, 2016, 19:01:01 »
With reference to reply 15 and others on the 'blanked' windows, I see the new build in Union Street  where the lock ups used to be has followed the example. One assumes to blend in.

 

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