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Author Topic: 1960 Shopping list enquiry.  (Read 7339 times)

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Offline conan

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Re: 1960 Shopping list enquiry.
« Reply #26 on: November 26, 2016, 19:56:17 »
There used to be signs up on the beaches on Sheppey that the shell fish gathered on the beaches on the Island should only be eaten after boiling for hours due to sewage and oil pollution,and yet we used to regularly swim in it :)
To remain ignorant of what happened before you were born is to remain a child......Cicero

Offline shoot999

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Re: 1960 Shopping list enquiry.
« Reply #25 on: November 26, 2016, 18:53:20 »
Thats right KeithJG. Its still there, although now called 'Chips on the Hill'.  I called in after an absence of nearly 50 years this summer and the chips were not too bad. They still prepare their own rather than having them shipped in frozen like a lot of places do. The lady serving had lived in the area all her life and said it was her familys favourite when she was a little girl.

Thats some memory Signals99! I would have been hard pressed to remember more than one or two; but you have certainly jogged my memory. Not least the wooden plank and clip round the ears that accompanied the short back and sides haircut! From what I can remember most of us were left out on the pavement to play whilst the mums did the shopping.

One thing that may have been peculiar to us as a family were the trips to Seasalter, Whitstable, etc, to collect cockles and winkles. I say that as dad was one of the few in those days to have transport (in our case a motorbike and sidecar). I remember getting home in the evening after a day at the beach and boiling them up in big pots and having them with vinegar and bread and butter.

Offline redge

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Re: 1960 Shopping list enquiry.
« Reply #24 on: November 26, 2016, 18:02:05 »
I think Mrs Dewsbury ran the post office moving round to Foord st/ Jonh st.in the sixties
redge

Offline Signals99

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Re: 1960 Shopping list enquiry.
« Reply #23 on: November 26, 2016, 07:02:58 »
Shoot 99, mention of the Cazeneuve Street shops ties up with Smiffys photo. I recall a boot repair shop, I think it was calld Pys; also Squirrels fish shop; Don Willams the butcher; a grocers` shop, can't remember the name; Tharpes, a newsagent and a general store plus Post office on the corner of Kings street. On the other side of the road was Woolis hairdressers ("keep your thundering head still boy"); a small general store called Russels and on the corner of King street, opposite the post office, was a cycle-come-radio shop (sixpence to charge an accumulator) got a feeling it was Sharmans or something similar. Just come to mind, two old ladies ran the general store/post office, name Hayman comes to mind. Somewhere in that lot was a plumbing est. name of Instead and Reed, may have been on the corner of Cazeneuve St. and Gravel/Granavel walk. Please feel free to correct me.Thank you all for your answers, really does mean a lot to me.

KeithJG

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Re: 1960 Shopping list enquiry.
« Reply #22 on: November 25, 2016, 21:05:36 »
shoot 999...was Wraggs the chippy somewhere around the far end of Rose Street, as my Stepmother used to take me there for our fish and chips because he cooked his chips with salt in the pan?
She wouldn't have chips from anywhere else -  just there.

I am talking 1961 when she married my Dad.


I remember  in the 1950's we had lamb most Sundays and chicken was too expensive, so just the odd time. I was lucky being an only child with both parents working.

Offline shoot999

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Re: 1960 Shopping list enquiry.
« Reply #21 on: November 24, 2016, 21:23:29 »
I  had a similar upbringing to Rochester-bred by the sound of it, and lived close by in Troy Town. Had to really think about this one and the first thing that struck me was 'weekly' in relation to shopping for food. At the start of the 60s that must have been a strange concept for most of us. Apart from the money issues many of us had, we not only had to rely on local shops stocking what we needed, but in a lot of cases had to rely on mum carrying enough in one shopping basket; whilst holding on to the youngest one in the family with the other hand, to last a few days.

When the Cazeneuve Sreet shops were demolished 'Parkes' in Rochester Ave. was the only general grocers shop close by so our 'menu' was pretty much dictated by what they had in stock. Failing that it was a bit of a trek to Star Hill with a couple of kids in tow for a bit more variety.

Friday was a good day. Some bargains at Rochester Market; supplemented by a two shilling bag of chips for the family from the Delce chippy. And, if dad had earned a bit extra ,a trip to Wraggs for some cod or rock.

What a difference to the end of the 60s. By that time wages were so much better, we had transport, more choice, and a trip to cafe was the norm, rather than a luxury. Certainly from my perspective the beginning of the 60s compared to end was a world apart. As I truthfully answered my granddaughter when she asked me when the world went from black and white to colour; 'the sixties'.

Offline smiler

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Re: 1960 Shopping list enquiry.
« Reply #20 on: November 24, 2016, 20:28:42 »
Cold meats in our house were brawn, tongue, udder and my favourite jelled veal. Corned beef hash and bullocks heart were hot meals I loved, sausagemeat another regular. Always a roast on Sundays with either "batter pudding" or plain pudding done in a cloth bit on dinner another bit after, with jam or syrup on it.

Offline Rochester-bred

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Re: 1960 Shopping list enquiry.
« Reply #19 on: November 24, 2016, 17:24:41 »
My mum had a wringer and we used to put toys through it which broke it. Kids eh! Also I remember the fresh fish shop in Victoria street next to the pub As a child I always held my nose when walking past, shame really as I love fish now .Coming from a Catholic family it was always fish and chips when we could afford it on a Friday night.
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Offline AlanH

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Re: 1960 Shopping list enquiry.
« Reply #18 on: November 24, 2016, 08:55:05 »
Your old house sounds much like ours in Baker Street RB. Outside toilet and a bath with water heated up by mum on the stove. Eldest in first. No electricity in those days either 40s through to early 50s.
Mum had a copper thing she boiled the washing up in (I think) then washed them by hand and put them through the wringer. Dangerous bit of equipment that was for large ladies!
Then in 1952 we moved to Maidstone

Offline Signals99

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Re: 1960 Shopping list enquiry.
« Reply #17 on: November 24, 2016, 08:37:06 »
Rochester-bred, sorry can't do a full week menu, but this may help you.
My family nearly always had fish on Friday, either with chips or mash. It mostly came from a fish shop in Victoria St., Rochester. Sorry can't remember the name of said shop. Sunday was always a roast yorkshire pud and veg, parsnips, roast spuds and cabbage. Monday nearly always was bubble and squeak (Sunday left overs fried) various meals got served during the week ie: toad in the hole and mash, summertime brought forth a rash of salads, main meats being corned dog or ham slices. Winter always produced a variation on stews, hot pots, usually a cheap cut of meat. belly pork, brisket. Another favourite meal my mum served was chops, lamb or pork, mashed spuds, peas all covered in gravy. What we got depended largely on the state of mums finances, so eat well on Sunday and Monday wing it for the rest of the week. Hope this helps.

Offline Longpockets

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Re: 1960 Shopping list enquiry.
« Reply #16 on: November 23, 2016, 16:54:51 »
. . . . and Pease Pudding and faggots.

Pease pudding with Butter Beans and boiled Ham.

Offline Rochester-bred

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Re: 1960 Shopping list enquiry.
« Reply #15 on: November 23, 2016, 16:35:44 »
I was still living in a house next to Rochester old railway station, Bardell terrace in 1971, unlike most folk in their nice houses, we had no inside loo, a tin bath, no hot water just a cold tap, no washing machine just an old copper, no fridge just a pantry with a stone shelf and no electric in the top of the house just gas mantles. I remember being so ashamed I never invited friends home and our staple diet was bread and milk cooked on the stove or toast done on the fork over the coal fire , we were poor `cos of family issues and even rummaged through clothes thrown on an old builders site between the Rochester court house and Bourne and Hilliers dairy, I found a pair of old platforms once. We slept on an old studio couch me and my 3 siblings and my mum slept in an armchair in the same room but when we moved out we still used the bucket of a night as we were not used to going downstairs where the bathroom and toilet was in the house, but you know what? We were happy and we knew no better, unlike today where so many are not happy yet have so much more, I often wonder what today's schools would say if they had seen in my lunch box -  cold toast with sugar on and a drink of water from the school fountain. My profile picture shows me standing in Bardell terrace.
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Offline Mickleburgh

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Re: 1960 Shopping list enquiry.
« Reply #14 on: November 23, 2016, 16:14:21 »
We were probably unique in our street in that my mother made curry from time to time, I absolutely loved it, father was not so keen. There was (early 1950s) a few doors away an Anglo-Indian family and my sister was best friends with the daughter (no thought ever entered my young mind that they might be `immigrants` or `foreign`, they were just there). The sari clad wife was, looking back on it, perhaps a rather sad, lonely, figure but she must have given my mother a few tips. By the mid-60s I was tempted into trying a Vesta dried packet curry to experience the more authentic taste ........ big mistake!  Mother`s other specialities were a suet bacon pudding with sage and onion, rolled and then boiled in a piece of cloth - mouth watering with new potatoes in the Spring and a white sauce. She got that from watching gypsy families boil them in a communal pot whilst working in the fields. Real Yorkshire puddings came from learning a top secret ingredient (a teaspoon full of vinegar) from a time served cook from those parts. We ate well, although goodness knows how without a supermarket to fall back on.

Offline Dave Smith

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Re: 1960 Shopping list enquiry.
« Reply #13 on: November 23, 2016, 15:07:40 »
Rochester-bred. I think some are remembering the 50's! ' cos things were definitely getting better for everyone by mid/late 60's - sorry I didn't clarify fish & chips as a take-away. I think it admirable what you intend to do as children have no idea - how could they? You could try cooking roast beef on Sunday (roast pots., parsnips, carrots, cabbage, Yorks. pud. & gravy), then cold with bubble & squeak (the last of the pots, etc. & cabbage, fried) on Monday & a stew with what's left on Tuesday (containing onions, more carrots & potatoes). Very nutritious, not too expensive & I think they would like it; as they would if you had steamed treacle pud. & custard for " afters". Not sure about liver though - or rabbit, my grand-children cringe at the thought. Just depends what you were brought up with.

Offline JohnWalker

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Re: 1960 Shopping list enquiry.
« Reply #12 on: November 23, 2016, 12:08:35 »
MP: Aye. In them days, we'd a' been glad to have the price of a cup o' tea.

GC: A cup ' COLD tea.

EI: Without milk or sugar.

TJ: OR tea!

MP: In a filthy, cracked cup.

EI: We never used to have a cup. We used to have to drink out of a rolled up newspaper.

GC: The best WE could manage was to suck on a piece of damp cloth.

TJ: But you know, we were happy in those days, though we were poor.

MP: Aye. BECAUSE we were poor. My old Dad used to say to me, 'Money doesn't buy you happiness.'

EI: 'E was right. I was happier then and I had NOTHIN'. We used to live in this tiny old house, with great big holes in the roof.

GC: House? You were lucky to have a HOUSE! We used to live in one room, all hundred and twenty-six of us, no furniture. Half the floor was missing; we were all huddled together in one corner for fear of FALLING!

TJ: You were lucky to have a ROOM! *We* used to have to live in a corridor!

MP: Ohhhh we used to DREAM of livin' in a corridor! Woulda' been a palace to us. We used to live in an old water tank on a rubbish tip. We got woken up every morning by having a load of rotting fish dumped all over us! House!? Hmph.

EI: Well when I say 'house' it was only a hole in the ground covered by a piece of tarpaulin, but it was a house to US.

GC: We were evicted from *our* hole in the ground; we had to go and live in a lake!

TJ: You were lucky to have a LAKE! There were a hundred and sixty of us living in a small shoebox in the middle of the road.

MP: Cardboard box?

TJ: Aye.

MP: You were lucky. We lived for three months in a brown paper bag in a septic tank. We used to have to get up at six o'clock in the morning, clean the bag, eat a crust of stale bread, go to work down mill for fourteen hours a day week in-week out. When we got home, our Dad would thrash us to sleep with his belt!

GC: Luxury. We used to have to get out of the lake at three o'clock in the morning, clean the lake, eat a handful of hot gravel, go to work at the mill every day for tuppence a month, come home, and Dad would beat us around the head and neck with a broken bottle, if we were LUCKY!

TJ: Well we had it tough. We used to have to get up out of the shoebox at twelve o'clock at night, and LICK the road clean with our tongues. We had half a handful of freezing cold gravel, worked twenty-four hours a day at the mill for fourpence every six years, and when we got home, our Dad would slice us in two with a bread knife.

EI: Right. I had to get up in the morning at ten o'clock at night, half an hour before I went to bed, (pause for laughter), drink a cup of sulphuric acid, work twenty-nine hours a day down mill, and pay mill owner for permission to come to work, and when we got home, our Dad and our mother would kill us, and dance about on our graves singing 'Hallelujah.'

MP: But you try and tell the young people today that... and they won't believe ya'.

Monty Python classic.  :)

 

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