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Author Topic: St. Margaretís Church, Dover  (Read 409 times)

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Offline kyn

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Re: St. Margaretís Church, Dover
« Reply #3 on: April 01, 2017, 22:14:14 »
There are lots of carvings, more than I have seen anywhere! They are medieval but I didn't have the full information to provide,  there was information in the church and drawings of each of the many carvings. 

Offline HERB COLLECTOR

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Re: St. Margaretís Church, Dover
« Reply #2 on: April 01, 2017, 12:35:48 »
Interesting graffiti.
They would seem to be medieval; the ship types shown had gone out of use by around 1500.
Possibly devotional in nature.
See http://www.pasthorizonspr.com/index.php/archives/12/2013/signs-sailors-ship-graffiti-medieval-churches

Offline kyn

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St. Margaretís Church, Dover
« Reply #1 on: March 31, 2017, 22:16:31 »


It is believed there was a church here in 1086 as there is structural evidence that the Norman church was built on the site of an older church.  An early survey showed that the church was begun at the East end and completed to the West, at the North side, at the junction of the Nave and Chancel, and angle of plain irregular stonework can be found, this is different to the rest of the churches construction and it is assumed it is the remains of the earlier building which was still standing when the church was being constructed, and incorporated into the new building.  The current building was constructed between 1130 and 1170; a portion of it collapsed and was rebuilt.



The church was part of the possessions of the priory of St. Martin since 1296.  During the dissolution of the priory during Henry VIIIís reign it transferred to the King who then gifted it to the manor, to the Archbishop.



The large chancel, clerestory and side aisles are Norman, the tower a mixture of 12th century work and 18th century.  The church is unusual as the aisles were planned and built long before they were generally added to churches.  The west doorway has fine examples of Norman carving, possibly representing the Lord and his 12 Apostles.



The tower once had four turrets, one on each corner, but in 1711 one collapsed which may have led to the other three being removed.




























 

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