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Author Topic: Wind Oil Mill - Gillingham  (Read 802 times)

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Offline smiffy

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Re: Wind Oil Mill - Gillingham
« Reply #16 on: June 03, 2017, 20:56:37 »
Exmouth Terrace fronted Medway Road and was much further north and west of the one on the Boundary Commission map. And who were Stephen and Edward Morgan as mentioned in the Heritage survey? Looks like this area used to be a hot-spot for mills of one description or another. All very intriguing as well as confusing!

Offline kms

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Re: Wind Oil Mill - Gillingham
« Reply #15 on: June 03, 2017, 18:01:40 »
Just to confuse things, here's the mill described as Elvys Mill, in conans link.  I wonder if we are talking about one or three oil mills here!  There is also another one at 'Herrings Hang' burned down in 1841, but not necessarily wind-powered....  So far the mill that formed the boundary is described as at Exmouth Terrace, and Coles Finch describes the Huggins one as in Charter Street.  Smiffy places one in Cornwall Road.  Confused, as I'd be surprised if there were three.  We know the one in the advert, and at Exmouth Terrace, and the one described as the new boundary marker in 1831/2 was of six storeys.  And we can't forget the Stedmans Mills either!  More research needed!

Offline kms

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Re: Wind Oil Mill - Gillingham
« Reply #14 on: June 03, 2017, 17:44:15 »
AHA!  Finally we have its 'convenient' demise by fire, which was in early 1858, and not in 1852.


Offline kms

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Re: Wind Oil Mill - Gillingham
« Reply #13 on: June 03, 2017, 17:38:26 »
Mill was still for sale in late 1849, three years later.  The failure to sell this mill probably contributed to a 'convenient' later fire.


Offline grandarog

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Re: Wind Oil Mill - Gillingham
« Reply #12 on: June 03, 2017, 17:24:33 »
Slightly off topic. Due to the ability of linseed oil to spontaneously combust it was a method of sabotage in France and occupied countries during WW2 .The method was to soak a rag in the oil then bind it tightly into a ball . Hidden in a suitable  heap of flammable material eventually it would ignite long after the saboteur had departed.

Offline kms

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Re: Wind Oil Mill - Gillingham
« Reply #11 on: June 03, 2017, 17:16:57 »
The fire relates to the link conan posted in reply #1

Coles-Finch mentions Huggins Mill, formerly an oilcake mill, being burned down.  This mess will take some sorting out!

Offline smiffy

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Re: Wind Oil Mill - Gillingham
« Reply #10 on: June 03, 2017, 17:15:32 »
The fire relates to the link conan posted in reply #1

Offline kms

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Re: Wind Oil Mill - Gillingham
« Reply #9 on: June 03, 2017, 16:07:17 »
Some really interesting information there kms - it's amazing what you can find out if you dig in the right places! It's not marked on the 1819 Mudge OS so I assume it must have been erected some time during the 1820's. There is an annoying gap in commonly available maps for the period from about 1820 - 1860 when there seemed to be quite a bit going on. After the sale in 1847 it would appear that it only lasted about five years before meeting a fiery end.

I can't find anything related to the fiery end.  This seems to refer to Huggins Mill on other thread.  I'll keep looking though.

Offline smiffy

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Re: Wind Oil Mill - Gillingham
« Reply #8 on: June 03, 2017, 15:57:19 »
Some really interesting information there kms - it's amazing what you can find out if you dig in the right places! It's not marked on the 1819 Mudge OS so I assume it must have been erected some time during the 1820's. There is an annoying gap in commonly available maps for the period from about 1820 - 1860 when there seemed to be quite a bit going on. After the sale in 1847 it would appear that it only lasted about five years before meeting a fiery end.

Offline kms

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Re: Wind Oil Mill - Gillingham
« Reply #7 on: June 03, 2017, 15:28:25 »
It was for sale in 1846 and 1847, and the machinery listed in this sale notice indicates it was a bit of a monster!


Offline kms

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Re: Wind Oil Mill - Gillingham
« Reply #6 on: June 03, 2017, 15:15:37 »
On the 1832 boundary map there is an oil mill clearly indicated. I can't find any reference to it and it isn't on any other map before or after this one, so it looks like it wasn't in use for very long. It's marked position would I believe place it somewhere within the circle on the modern view, just south of where Burnt Oak Farm used to be. The other mill on the map is likely to be Stedman's, although according to Coles Finch it wasn't moved here until 1839.

The mill must have have been well established in terms of time, as it became the one of the boundaries marked for the new Chatham borough established 1831-2.  At this point it was owned by Mr Nash.

Offline conan

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Re: Wind Oil Mill - Gillingham
« Reply #5 on: May 28, 2017, 23:06:12 »
Reading about these mills catching fire I was minded of accounts of the inflammability of linseed oil, a definitely dodgy substance and I wonder how many fires were caused but by spontaneous combustion

https://www.peelmutual.com/peelmutual_com/bank/pageimages/combustibility_of_linseed_oils.pdf
To remain ignorant of what happened before you were born is to remain a child......Cicero

Offline kms

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Re: Wind Oil Mill - Gillingham
« Reply #4 on: May 28, 2017, 14:10:14 »
I think this illustrates precisely why I'm leaving the Medway volume to the end.  Windmills in rapidly urbanising areas make money but come and go quickly, and often too quickly for the cartographer.  I discovered this is South London...

Two things spring to mind.  Firstly, I must get a good look at the ledgers of George Stedman, held at Medway archives.  If they go back to these sort of dates then they should reveal a great deal as he is likely to have built most of the mills around here, corn or oil-cake.  I would hazard a guess that the corn mill shown on here is the other mill mentioned by Coles-Finch as Stedmans, and shown in the photos.  It would seem that this is the mill marked on the map and the sole mill mentioned in the tithe schedule.  The mill from Conyer Quay Teynham, wasn't moved until 1845 at the earliest, when it was being advertised for sale or removal.  In 1796 it was an oil mill, unusually with steam mill attached, but by 1845 it had been converted to grinding corn.

Just to give you an idea of the linseed industry.  It appears that there was a bit of a fad to produce linseed in quantity from about 1790.  Mills sprung up everywhere in Kent to produce oilcake and linseed.  The fad quickly ran out, as the industry wasn't as generous or in demand as was expected, and most of the mills were converted to the production of flour.  The last mill I can find producing linseed was the other mill at Nonington in the latter half of the nineteenth century.

Offline smiffy

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Re: Wind Oil Mill - Gillingham
« Reply #3 on: May 27, 2017, 20:13:39 »
The description and date seems to fit, although the place they've got it marked is nowhere near where it is on the map! I'm not surprised it burnt down, this seems to have been the fate of many mills over the years. I sometimes wonder what the insurance premiums must have been like. :)

Offline conan

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To remain ignorant of what happened before you were born is to remain a child......Cicero

 

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