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Author Topic: To Australia from Tilbury  (Read 707 times)

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Offline Dave Smith

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Re: To Australia from Tilbury
« Reply #12 on: June 24, 2017, 20:33:42 »
Afraid there are always some who spoil it for everyone else. Most people just want to get on with living but...!! Big problem here is that the police in particular daren't do what they would like to for fear of being branded " racist"! My RAF friend is 87 & on the Air Force Estate at Bull Creek. Is pretty fit & quite active & goes on cruises a lot.

Offline AlanH

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Re: To Australia from Tilbury
« Reply #11 on: June 24, 2017, 09:58:00 »
Like the UK there are whole communities here who bring all their hatred and vendettas with them . The governments are the same as well, bending over backwards to appease them and the UN and it doesn't bode well for the future. Problem is amongst all those who cause the trouble there are many who just want to get on and enjoy living here.
Our logical immigration policy went out the door many years ago, now they bow down to the UN and anyone who screams "racism" and lets in the world garbage.
We all know who the real crooks are but it doesn't matter if you vote Tory/Liebour/black/white/green or just plain stupid they all turn out to be self interested.
Back on track... we've got an old friend of 92 who lives in a RAAF place in Merriwa WA and still keeps as active as he can. We went to him and his dear wife's 70th anniversary and she passed away not long after. My better half was heart broken.
AlanH.
 

Offline Dave Smith

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Re: To Australia from Tilbury
« Reply #10 on: June 23, 2017, 13:09:22 »
AlanH. Ah- the developers! About the same as here now, 10 to the acre ( or more if you can put them on 3 floors). Afraid I have been mainly involved with suburbs- G'daughter in Byford, RAF friend was in Thornlie, now at Bull Creek & another RAF friend's widow in Yokine. All in all, I liked it very much there. I thought Au. had a logical immigrant policy, take in those who's skills are wanted- & can speak the lingo- but no doubt you also have the do gooders; let everyone in no matter what! I suppose Fremantle prison is unique in that it was built by the convicts themselves. And a lot would have been better than real rogues, so useful when they'd finished their time.

Offline AlanH

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Re: To Australia from Tilbury
« Reply #9 on: June 23, 2017, 09:21:57 »
The quarter acre bloke went years ago Dave. The developers and councils needed to make more money so in places it's down to around 350sq.mtrs. Cities have grown incredibly big and they sprawl everywhere. Perth has grown from about 500K when I came here in 1973 to about 2 million now.
I see the latest figures for the UK are above 65 million!!!! And I bet they missed many of the illegals.
Not much rain or cold so far this winter but it's bloody freezing today with a bitter wind straight off the Indian Ocean.
We've got many of the same probs. the UK has with a certain type of migrant and our pollies are just as weak in not saying enoughs enough. Still a good place to live though with plenty of opportunities.
We've also got a bit of history here going back to the 1800s when one of our ancestors, Victor McDonald, married a lady by the name of Annie Rose in 1878 in Freo (Fremantle). Apparently he was a marine.
No convicts that I know of but most of the settlement was by free travellers anyway and they, the convicts, were only  a small part of it. Amazing how many Aussies can claim to be a direct descendent of some petty crime or other though....  :)
Cheers.
AlanH.     

Offline Dave Smith

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Re: To Australia from Tilbury
« Reply #8 on: June 22, 2017, 14:23:57 »
DavetheTrain. And we had Borstal & they had The Prison - both now defunct! But no cathedral or Norman castle there. However, I have to agree with Alan H - no real comparison for they have so much space - average plot 1/4 acre - & lots of hot weather does make a big difference. They complain at their cold winters - not much colder than our summers!

Offline Dave Smith

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Re: To Australia from Tilbury
« Reply #7 on: June 22, 2017, 14:08:23 »
Mickleburgh. My sister in law's husband was Australian but fought with the New Zealand army. After the war, those with no where to go were given a few acres by the Govt. to farm - this was around the middle of North Island. I wonder whether the Aus. Govt. did the same, hence him being in Tasmania?

Offline Lyn L

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Re: To Australia from Tilbury
« Reply #6 on: June 22, 2017, 11:57:51 »
Admittedly NOT Australia but, my late hubby's relatives emigrated to NZ in 1874. I find it amazing that people were brave enough to go , when all their families were still here in Kent. They had 3 children, 4 yrs, 2 yrs and 4 mths when they sailed from Plymouth  on SS Waikato  on March 24th and arrived in Wellington NZ on July 11th. I imagine it must have been a very scary voyage . How they managed with a baby too is remarkable to me. Descendants are still there to this day.
Half our life is spent trying to find something to do with the time we have rushed through life tryi

Offline Mickleburgh

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Re: To Australia from Tilbury
« Reply #5 on: June 22, 2017, 10:58:13 »
My own family involvements with Australia have always been all but zero, avoiding even `transportation` which in itself is perhaps a minor mystery. But there was a distant aunt who in 1958, aged 79 and ten years widowed, suddenly upped sticks and sailed away. The assumption then was that she joined her only son and his family `down-under`. Christmas cards continued but when my mother wrote (about five years later) to tell her my Grandmother had died it brought a rather sad reply saying how she so missed the `old days` and that she did wonder if she had dome the right thing in moving.
More recent research has revealed that she survived well into her `90s and died in the Adelaide area. That then threw up a mystery. Her son had been a Japanese POW who I rather suspect never returned to the UK, but I can find no record of a marriage for him in Australia and he died only a few years after her in Tasmania! The more you try and piece family memories together the more complex lives seem to become.

Offline AlanH

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Re: To Australia from Tilbury
« Reply #4 on: June 22, 2017, 09:13:35 »
HAHAHA Keep dreaming DaveTheTrain. I don't think Perth WA would like those comparisons. And it's "Fremantle" not Freemantle (commonly referred to as Freo) and they still have a busy port but just tourist ships and cargo and occasionally foreign warships. Actually we can see the ships coming and going as they pass through Gage Roads or are moored up, from the back of our house. Very pleasant to watch when having a quiet cold one or two.
I can just imagine laying on the Strands "beach" on a winters day, a thing which many tourists do here at Cott and send selfies off to all their shivering rellies back home.  :) Not today though as it's down to about 18C and windy with some rain.
I did come back for 2 years in 1977 but lived in Wigmore and after about 6 months of hearing the kids asking "When we going down the beach Dad?" I thought we should plan our move back to Perth.
Last trip was in 1989 and haven't bothered since. I think I'll remember it as it was not as it appears now to us expats.
Cheers and enjoy the few days sun you're getting.
AlanH.

AlanH.
 

Offline DaveTheTrain

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Re: To Australia from Tilbury
« Reply #3 on: June 21, 2017, 15:08:49 »
Perth WA. Still here 44 years later.
 

Thinking about this, the Medway Towns and Perth, WA are very similar.  You have the Swan River, we have the Medway;  Cottesloe Beach could pass for The Strand on a good day and Freemantle had a bit of Maritime history, just like Chatham used to have. Just can't find a comparison to the WACA stadium.  Perhaps the towns should be twinned!  :)


Offline AlanH

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Re: To Australia from Tilbury
« Reply #2 on: June 21, 2017, 09:42:01 »
You either like it or go back home. Oz is not for everyone but all of my family gradually emigrated to here starting in the mid 60s. Eldest bro probably about '64 and went to Melbourne.
Sister and her hubby went to NSW in around '65 or '66 and mother joined them in 1967. They had flown out but she came by ship from Southampton. Bands playing and flags flying and that was quite emotional.
My wife and I drove down there to see her off in the taxi I drove for Vokes Taxis in Chatham..... not sure Graham (the owner) would have approved.  :)
Younger bro came out in about 1968 and went to Melbourne ...stayed 10 days and departed for Sydney where he still lives.
 
The wife and I didn't bother to emigrate until 1972 and came on a VC10 via the USA, the first flight we'd done. We went to Melbourne where my brother had fixed us up with a place to stay instead of going to a migrant hostel.
Elder brother departed Oz for ever a couple of years later and went to the USA and now lives in Switzerland. Younger bro lives in a very swank part of Sydney.
Sister now lives in NZ not far from her daughter.
Mum departed this mortal coil about 15 years ago aged 90 but had travelled to many places in Oz and overseas since arriving. Something she probably wouldn't have done if still living in Cookham Wood.
I left Melbourne after 2 years when the company I worked for transferred me to Perth WA. Still here 44 years later.
Had a friend from my apprentice days at Blaw Knox come out with his family about 1973. They went to a hostel and stayed there for the max. period they were allowed to under the rules.
Then they rented a place nearby so she could go on working at the hostel, kids could still attend the same school and he could still do the same job he'd had since arriving.
Then virtually 2 years to the day from they arrived they were back on the plane and home again. At least they gave it a good go but obviously couldn't settle.
Personally I could never live back in the towns, far too crowded for me. Plus from what we see and read about so many things we could never resettle. And the weather is still lousy...... which was one of the 2 main reasons we left in the first place. The other I won't mention as my reply would be deleted as "inflammatory comment".....
Cheers.
AlanH.
 
 

Offline Mickleburgh

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To Australia from Tilbury
« Reply #1 on: June 20, 2017, 14:24:02 »
Speaking to someone who had flown in from Australia for a neighbour`s funeral and who said they had never regretted emmigrating out there some forty odd years ago cast my mind back to Tilbury in the 1950s early `60s and the regular sight of the immigrant ships on the river, taking the subsidised `Ten pound Poms` off to a new life down under. Individual circumstances vary enormously, of course, but I always felt it takes a degree of courage to uproot in this way, sailing away, possibly never to return, to a totally new country and life. Certainly never appealed to me.
On a couple of occasions in the early 1960s work took me to Tilbury from Herne Bay with both departing and returning immigrants. The first couple seemed to have said their goodbyes and departure by car was quite low-key. They seemed very laid back about it all where I would probably have been quite emotional about the last sight of my native county. We crossed on the car ferry from Gravesend on that occasion, looking at the ship moored at the terminal and I asked if the move was for good, `That`s the idea, new life` was the reply. I can only surmise that they `made it`.
The second visit to Tilbury was with the mini-bus and via the Dartford tunnel to pick up a returning couple, taking up several relatives including, so I gathered, the mother and grand-mother of the husband involved.  My jaw must have dropped when I asked this last at a comfort stop how long they had been out in Australia and she grimly replied `two months`. Don`t think she was any too amused by it all. The pick-up process was a lot more chaotic than a departure but eventually this young couple and their toddler were located and luggage, such as it was, loaded and we headed home.
As it happened this couple finished up in a rented house in our street, relatives able to help but not accommodate presumably, thus we heard the full story, that dissatisfaction with both Australia and the job found for him started almost as soon as they landed and that they had borrowed heavily to secure this early passage home and also repay the subsidised outward passage. Even so, the prevailing view locally was that no matter how bad things might turn out you needed at least to `Give it a go` for a bit longer than two months! Cannot recall what the husband did for living but he got a job working away a lot and as a result I got called one day to help the wife, who I noted was now pregnant again, fix a faulty door lock. I was shocked to see how they were living, the proverbial upturned tea chest for a table, garden deck chairs and the toddler sleeping in an old drawer! Never quite decided whether that woman was an air-head or still in a state of suspended shock. Soon afterwards they moved away somewhere but I have often since wondered whether that marriage survived such an episode.

 

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