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Author Topic: Severe Weather, 1837  (Read 264 times)

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Offline Leofwine

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Re: Severe Weather, 1837
« Reply #6 on: July 04, 2017, 13:31:00 »
Re Brompton, from it's founding until the incorporation of Gillingham Borough, it was always abut one third in Chatham (Civil) Parish, the other two-thirds in Gillingham (Civil) Parish. Early Brompton deeds often contain the phrase "in the parishes of Chatham & Gillingham in the county of Kent or in one of them" as the parish boundaries were an arbitrary line on a map, with nothing on the ground to indicate the border!. Ecclesiastcal parishes are rather more complicated.
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Offline Dave Smith

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Re: Severe Weather, 1837
« Reply #5 on: July 04, 2017, 12:37:00 »
I suppose the Medway towns were on Watling Street, a major road to Canterbury &,more importantly, Dover. So anything/anybody from London for the Continent would pass that way. Presumably East Hill is Chatham Hill & West Hill Strood Hill? From those statistics of population, it would appear that Brompton was within the Chatham boundary before coming within Gillingham. As you say, life was a darn sight harder then & the drifts were not within the Towns but to put them into perspective, next time you go out of your front door, turn round & look back- imagine snow up to the top of the bedroom windows ( approx.16ft.) and over the roof( 30ft.).

Offline smiffy

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Re: Severe Weather, 1837
« Reply #4 on: July 03, 2017, 17:30:04 »
Life being harder, most people probably coped better with it then, than they would now.

I'm surprised about the stagecoaches as well. I wouldn't have thought there was such a volume of through traffic then, especially as many of the roads were hardly in the best of shape a lot of the time. Add all of the commercial, military and private traffic and things would seem to have been very busy.

I know where East Hill is, but it would be interesting to know where West Hill and Davisís Straights were, I've never heard of them.



Offline Leofwine

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Re: Severe Weather, 1837
« Reply #3 on: July 03, 2017, 17:00:38 »
The 1841 Census returned 2,911 inhabited houses in Chatham with a population of 21,431. Gillingham was 1258 houses with a population of 6059. The united population of Rochester, Strood, Chatham, Brompton & Gillingham was 42,422, including 6,582 in barracks and hospitals. That's the closest figures I could get to 1837.
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Offline Dave Smith

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Re: Severe Weather, 1837
« Reply #2 on: July 03, 2017, 14:11:23 »
Wow;Wow & even more Wow!! Almost unbelievable. 30ft of snow would easily cover a standard house. Interesting that a couple of years prior to the advent of " the penny post", there were 40 stagecoaches passing through the Medway towns per day. Any one know the population of the owns then? In the 30's/40's when I lived in Gillingham the population was 60k & Chatham 24k with Rochester, I think 14k, presumably not including the Strood area.

Offline Leofwine

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Severe Weather, 1837
« Reply #1 on: July 03, 2017, 04:04:11 »
South Eastern Gazette - Tuesday 03 January 1837
LOCAL EFFECTS OF THE SNOW STORM.
Rochester, Chatham, &c.- On Saturday the wind blew tremendously from the north all day. Sunday came with still greater terrors. The hurricane was scarcely less violent than that of the 29th Nov. The destruction done to the craft in the river Is very great. Several poor fishermen have lost their boats, and indeed, the damage done far exceeds any thing remembered. Boats from Strood to Sheerness have been either blown on shore and destroyed, sunk, or driven from their moorings. A barge, laden with lime, near Rochester Bridge, caught fire, owing to the sea washing over her, and ultimately sunk. Another barge off Joslinís wharf, Chatham, also sunk on Sunday night. The damage done to houses has been extensive. At Brompton, a stack of chimneys of a house, occupied by Mr. Hayes, hair dresser, was blown down, beating in the roof and burying the inmates in the ruins. They were providentially got out without sustaining any very serious injury. The water mill, belonging to Hulkes' brewery, was blown down in Chatham, and large tree was torn up by the roots, on the brook. A man was passing at the time, but fortunately escaped. Balance, the watchman, of St. Margaret's Bank, whilst on duty, was blown down five times, and bruised very severely. Trade was entirely suspended. On Monday and Tuesday there was scarcely a shop open, and the streets were literally choked with snow. Not a stage coach passed through the towns for three daysó although upon an average forty pass daily. On the main road, on each side of the town, snow laid in many places seventeen feel deep; and in the cut at West Hill, known as "Davisís Straights." the snow had drifted to the depth of thirty feet. The Yarmouth steamer was driven into this port on Monday evening, with the loss of bowsprit, anchor, &c. A man arrived here with foreign mail in a cart, from Gravesend, having effected his journey across the fields in six hours. It was found impossible, however, to forward it on. On Tuesday morning, a mail was dispatched to London, about seven o'clock; and it was ascertained that in four hours it had reached no further than Chalk; after a severe struggle over hedges, fields, &c, An application was made for the military on Monday night, to open the road leading to Gravesend, which was readily granted; and about four hundred soldiers marched from the barracks, on Tuesday morning, each carrying shovel; and before night effected a passage. On Wednesday, the vans began to run, and the "Commodore" coach, for the first time in the week, made its appearance for London. At Strood, at the bottom of the hill near the milestone, a cottage was completely buried in snow, and the inmates had to be dug out.
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