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Author Topic: Model of Folkestone Harbour railway  (Read 935 times)

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Offline CommanderChuff

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Re: Model of Folkestone Harbour railway
« Reply #9 on: February 17, 2018, 14:45:35 »
The story of the harbour at Folkestone has mainly been concentrated on the railway and its particularities.   The information on the shipping is quite sparse when the fishing fleet and the cross channel steamers have been accounted for.

The area of interest for some marine models to liven up the harbour scene on the layout is centres around life boats and WW2 events at Dunkirk, the planned Sealion invasion and D-Day.  There are snippets of information in books and on the internet which I have gathered together to form an opinion of which ships played a part.

I hope that you will be able to comment on my findings so far and I would love to hear more of the Dunkirk little ships and any other unusual craft in the harbour.

1.   1940 - Dunkirk: 
a.   Folkestone Belle (now Southsea Belle) motor launch, was built in oak and mahogany at Cowes in 1928, used as a ferry at Hayling Island, was requisitioned in 1940 for Dunkirk via Ramsgate, returning with about 100 men and the crossing took 19 hours.
b.   Bluebell - There were three Bluebird boats owned by Malcolm Campbell, all went to Dunkirk, - Winser gives the skipper of Bluebell as Booth.  Bluebird of Chelsea, 23 tons, 52 ft, built 1931 by Thornycrofts of Southampton, as a twin petrol-engined wooden carvel-built motor yacht, Went to Dunkirk after two false starts, first due to engine trouble and then over-crowding. Her return from Dunkirk was even more fraught: after first refilling the fuel tanks with water, then fouling her screws on debris, she returned under tow. Her later wartime service was spent in Scotland performing transport work for the RASC, then later on the South coast around Weymouth and Gosport possibly as a radar decoy ship. Her history after this is sketchy, although she was renamed Blue Finch and found herself on the Atlantic coast of the South of France: 
c.   CHICO, 80 tons 73 ft, 11 kts, built in 1932 at Miller's yard in St Monans, Fife, to a G L Watson design, requisitioned by the Navy in December 1939, and fitted with Lewis guns and echo sounding gear, commissioned as HMS Chico in March 1940, based at Dover on minesweeping duty. At 2130 on 25th May a force of seven trawlers, three yachts (the Grey Mist, Conidaw and Chico), and two drifters sailed for Calais Roads ready to evacuate troops the moment an order to do so was received. On 30th May the Chico (under Sub -Lieut. J. Mason, RNVR, Winser gives the owner name as Onslow) left Dover for Dunkirk where she embarked 217 troops and returned to Dover. On the 31st she ferried nearly 1,000 troops from the Dunkirk shore to ships, disembarking a further estimated 100 troops herself on her return to Dover. On 2nd June, she was transferred to life-saving duties on Route X - a new middle route prepared between Dover and Dunkirk, from the North Goodwin to the Ruytingen Pass and thence into Dunkirk Road. She saw further action with enemy aircraft in the Channel and is thought to be the ASR vessel berthed in Folkestone Harbour in 1942. 
d.   BLUE BIRD of 1938 previously Bluebird II, Goole Shipbuilding Co Ltd, 107ft, 12 kts.  In September 1941 Blue Bird was posted to Londonderry, N. Ireland engaged in the H.M. Customs Examination Service with a complement of two RNR officers and 16 crew, to patrol the coast of Ulster and Eire to intercept 'neutral' cargo vessels and to identify coasters in the channel approaches.

2.   Jan 1942: Royal Naval Patrol Service:  Local Air Sea-Rescue Service was provided at Folkestone by fast patrol boat BLUEBIRD commanded by Ty/Sub Lt J D Caldwell RNVR.  (Don Kindell, Admiralty Reports Dover Command RN Ships, Naval-history.net).  The term fast patrol boat is very misleading as I believe that this vessel was HMS Chico, the second Bluebell boat of Sir Malcolm Campbell, and it was only capable of cruising at 11 knots.  It appears that she was mainly employed on servicing the rescue floats anchored in the Channel.


3.   May 1943:  Combined Operations base. Base was commissioned as HMS Allenby on 14/3/43 and paid off on 10/4/45. Some records show that the base was in existence as early as 1/12/42. Possibly called Bluebird III before 12/42. If so reverted to Bluebird III 11/45.  The Royal Pavilion Hotel provided accommodation for the RN unit and stores. (Combined Operations forum)

4.   June 1944: Operation Neptune on D-Day :
a.   Landing Craft base constructed, with ramps consisting of x1 LST and x3 LCT Hards (NT1). 
b.   Operation Glimmer – x12 HMDL’s formed part of the decoy operation and sailed out towards the French coast flying balloons to represent a fleet of larger ships. 
c.   Follow up Force L – on evening of D-Day a WREN was in the harbour and watched troops loading into LCI’s.
d.   Ferry service for leave troops, mail ships, and landing of unusual loads from LCT’s (captured German equipment and salvaged aircraft).
e.   Mulberry Harbour tugs:  the sections of the Mulberries were parked at Dungeness, and Folkestone Bell was used as a tug to move components around.  She was taken over to Arromanches and was a harbour launch there.  I believe that she was used to tow the whale piers and beetles from the parking lots to Folkestone which were then assembled into towing units for convoy to France.

5.   Late 1944: Training Base: Lt. Brown, Peter Henry, Oct 1944 – Mar 1945, lent to HMS Allenby (Combined Operations base, Folkestone) as training officer at base for minor craft pool.




David,
Royal Navy, Aircraft Engineer, Project Manager, Yachtsman, Eroica Cyclist,  Railway Modeller

Offline CommanderChuff

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Re: Model of Folkestone Harbour railway
« Reply #8 on: February 06, 2018, 11:46:34 »
Article:  Bus-on-a-Crane in Folkestone Harbour.

Author:  David Austin, v2, 10 Feb 2018.

The most interesting thing about a seaport is the variety of loads which are booked in to be sent off to foreign places.  And so it proved when a member of the South Eastern & Chatham railway society was given a photograph of an untypical harbour scene.   On the quayside of the harbour is a double bus being lifted off the ground by a railway crane.  This image created much interest in our community of inquisitive historians and, from the get-go, there were a few pet theories to be considered to explain this remarkable event.
To describe the scene in the image, and taking the main subject first, the bus is clearly identifiable as a Tilley-Stevens double decker with the registration mark of TE9523.  This model has been confirmed as a TS3 Petrol-Electric which was built in the early 1900’s. The registration mark falls into the sequence of issued marks to around 1921. This date indicator is important to setting the historical context and unravelling the story of this dangling bus. 
Tilling-Stevens was an early builder of buses and its products became very popular with users and drivers. Its success was due to its 'petrol-electric' transmission rather than the conventional non synchromesh gearbox of that period. The process of changing gears in a ‘crash box’ required the combination of manual dexterity and fine timing.  And whilst there were very few people who could drive on the roads there were even fewer who could juggle the controls of a bus.  So the gearless Tilling’s bus was a significant innovation in reducing operating costs as well as giving work to non-skilled bus staff. In the vehicle the petrol, and later the diesel, engine was connected to an electricity generator. The power produced was passed to an electric motor which drove the rear wheels. This method of propulsion was so unusual in the world of commercial lorries that it was decided not to send any with the BEF to France in 1914.  So during the war the company supplied many national bus companies with its products leading its popularity.
The crane is as interesting as it is unusual in this setting of the harbour of Folkestone.  It looks like a mobile railway crane of the type seen in breakdown trains and not on the quayside of a small harbour.  There is a long history of development of the docks here and it would be useful to summarise the main events to trace the history of cranes.  In the 18th Century Folkestone was the closest natural harbour to the Continent and it was to become the home of ardent smugglers and the target of fearsome pirates.  The main, and only source for many centuries, of legal income was the fishing fleet.  But the harbour was no haven of safety when the great storms of the time ran up the Channel and, destroying everything in their paths, leaving the town destitute and fisherman unable to feed their families on these sad occasions.  There were major severe storms in 1703, 1724, 1766, 1797, and just two years later, in 1799.  After the last great storm the harbour was strengthened to protect the fishing fleet. In 1820 the works were completed to enclose the harbour in a cocoon of stone walling.   But the tides continued to scour the beaches and drive shingle and mud up the coastline and into the harbour. The harbour commissioners gave up the unequal struggle of the encroaching beach and sold out to the South Eastern Railway in 1942 who built additional quays and cleared out the shingle. The consequence of a longer western pier was that tide power gradually formed a new spit of land to the south of the harbour. The SER took advantage of this new arrival and built a quay on the shingle bank to berth cross channel ferries and a railway station to run trains up to the London to Dover mainline.
The story of the dockside cranes begins in 1850 when the harbour station was opened on the south quay.  A pair of hand operated swan neck cranes on four wheeled rail trolleys were used to load luggage and cargo into the ferries.  They featured chain lifts and large handles.  The next big development was the building of the Channel station in 1776 on a steel framed and timber pier to the south of the shingle bank.  The pier was built with a low water landing stage to permit the channel steamers to tie up at all states of the tide. The evolution of larger steamships to cater for increasing volumes of passenger traffic forced the company to search for deeper water and in 1881 – 1883 the southern pier was reinforced and extended. The chief engineer of the SER was Francis Brady and he describes the process for the new construction in The Engineer.  The railway company made cement concrete blocks on the site from materials sourced from company owned quarries. The blocks measured 4ft. 6in. by 6ft. by 9ft and weighed 16 tons each. These were laid onto the sea floor up to the height of the original timber pier by being lifted in place with a yard engine using a chain over a pulley and positioned underwater by two divers. A breakwater was built on the west side to protect the pier from the prevailing weather and heavy waves. Piles are driven in by two men on a windlass dropping a heavy pile donkey onto the timbers and the pier was reinforced with an infill of rubble to make a seawall.  During rough weather the yard engine was unable to be used to lay concrete blocks at the works face so it was employed on pile driving. The engine was connected to the pile donkey with a chain over pulleys and was driven forwards to lift the weight.  A man then released the donkey to smite the pile.  This method speeded up the work and two piles per day could be installed.  In correspondence with a member of the Breakdown Crane Association the following information was provided.  In 1880 the South Eastern Railway ordered a crane from Thomas Smith, in Rodley near Leeds under works no. 2784. It is described as being a railway breakdown crane, but was initially to be used on the construction of that phase of Folkestone harbour construction handling blocks, piles, kentledge etc. It had the reasonably high capacity for the time of sixteen tons and was mounted on only two axles.  It had a fixed jib that could be lowered to allow it to travel on the railway within the loading gauge, and was given couplings, buffers and suitable running gear for travelling in train.   Another crane was ordered by the SER at much the same time from Cowans & Sheldon, Carlisle works no. 1110 of 1881 and it remained at Folkestone.  The evidence of the chief engineer on the use of a steam engine to lift and lower the blocks into the water is very clearly stated in his account of 1882 so it appears that the railway cranes were used to handle the concrete blocks from the moulds to the working face of the pier.
As the 19th century was coming to a conclusion the adventure seeking travelling public were crossing the channel to visit far off places on the Continent in ever increasing numbers. Folkestone harbour was proving very popular as a jumping off point and the volume of passenger traffic increased dramatically. The railway company commissioned the development of the harbour between 1897 and 1905 to greatly extend the southern quay goods warehouses and the southern pier into deeper water. The engineer for this work was Francis Brady and his account is used to describe the construction works. The new pier extension was built onto the existing south pier using 20 ton concrete blocks faced with granite.  These blocks are lifted in using two 20 ton Goliath cranes mounted upon lattice girders of 40ft span, which were built onto piles of Oregon pine.  The blocks were eased into their correct position by a pair of hard hat divers operating from two 13 foot high diving bells of 16 tons each and these were handled by another two Goliaths of 30 ton capacity.  The whole staging was 101ft wide, 400ft long, and 21ft above the water level and covered the width and length of the construction.  At the completion of the pier special cranes were provided to lift and load baggage boxes onto the ferries.  These were mounted on travelling gantries on the pier or on railway trolleys on the pier and on the quayside.  These were fixed jib steam powered cranes and appeared in two versions, the housing of corrugated sheet was either pent roofed or curve roof. The gantry cranes were replaced by electric powered versions from about 1930. In another photo of the gantry cranes lifting a baggage box off a railway truck it is noticeable the shunting engine is still attached to the truck and the driver is paying close attention to the lifting activity.  As the crane has a fixed jib and therefore cannot extend its radius of lift to reach out to the next box on the truck it must be that the engine driver shunts the truck closer to the crane so it can pick up the next box. This is an important aspect of replicating the loading operational procedures in the model.
The mobile railway crane in the bus-on-a-crane photo is fairly unique in the setting of a dockyard. It appears to have a lift capacity of about 15 tons capacity.  The crane is mounted on a 6 wheeled railway vehicle chassis and it can be marshalled into a train and moved at speed on the railway.  This type would be used on railway breakdown trains and would normally be recovering railway locos and vehicles after a derailment. The first crane of this type on the Folkestone docks appears in a photograph dated 1915 and is used to load private cars, this has a corrugated sheet housing on a fairly simple four wheel chassis.  The information from the Breakdown Crane Association has mentioned that the SER had ordered a crane from Cowans & Sheldon, Carlisle (works no. 1110) in 1881.  The correspondent offers the thought that the crane in the photo is this C&S six wheeled mobile crane.
Since the railway arrived in Folkestone there has been a history of constant development and expansion of the harbour to cater for the increasing numbers of passengers who wish to travel to the Continent and further afield.  The inaugural opening of the railway harbour station in 1850 was a milestone in cross channel and international traffic. But the records show that the adventurous travellers were even more ready and willing to take their own personal transport.  During the first year of the service in 1850 the railway company loaded 235 carriages and 909 horses onto their ferries alongside the 60,000 passengers who made the crossing.  As animal horse power was superseded by iron horse power in the early years of the 1900’s the motorcar became the main accompaniment for the explorer of means.  And then it was the turn of the omnibus and charabanc for those who preferred a more leisurely mode of transport.
The need to carry increasing numbers of passengers in large conurbations with faster, farther and more efficient vehicles started with George Shillibeer’s horse bus service for London in 1829. As cities grew in population and real estate towards the end of the 19th century a variety of ingenious mechanical were spawned from the fertile minds of the industrial revolution era engineers. Buses, powered by steam, electric, a combination of petrol and electric – and petrol, swept the last of the horse buses from London streets by 1914. After the Great War, social changes and London’s expanding suburbs led to a huge increase in public travel, so hard-pressed operators sought larger buses to carry more passengers. The London of the “Roaring 20s” was a kaleidoscope of brightly coloured buses in the liveries many companies, including the so-called ‘pirates’ of the independent operators. By the end of the 1920s, buses had covered top-decks, softer-ride suspension with pneumatic balloon tyres for improved passenger comfort, and drivers’ cabs now had a windscreen for protection against the weather. The social activity of travelling very long distances with a group of friends made the new comfortable bus an ideal choice for exploring the eastern reaches of the Continent.
A correspondent on the Kent History Forum has said that UK based passenger vehicles were being shipped to the continent from at least 1921 for touring purposes. The pioneers were Chapmans (of Eastbourne and London) and Motorways (Lyons) of London. They offered eighteen day tours of the continent for 18 guineas.  Apart from the obvious destinations of the South of France and Italy they ranged as far as Gibraltar, North Africa and even Moscow. The vast range of luggage labels which can be seen was a virtual lesson in geographical locations. In the immediate aftermath of the end of the Great War the main civilian route appears to have been to Ostend from Folkestone for tours of the battlefields. The ports of Dover, Calais and Boulogne all seemed to join the fray a little later as regards coach shipments. There is evidence that buses were being lifted onto channel ferries in Dover in 1926 as a Manchester firm had started a Continental coach tour from that port. Apart from a few spaces on train ferries the loading of buses by crane over the side remained the standard practice until the early 1950’s.  A number of major touring firms avoided the hassle and time consuming business of transhipment by crane by maintaining a permanent stable of buses on the continent.  The installation of a large ramp at Dover for loading vehicles directly onto car ferries in 1953 removed all obstacles to fast vehicle self-loading and the cranes were put on other services. Folkestone was provided with a roll-on / roll-off ramp at about the same time.
The Tilling-Stevens history does not mention any export details but the information from the M&D and EK Bus club shows that the municipal authorities in Spain had started a public bus service in their main cities in the early 1920's.  This new transport system had proved so popular that the local transport suppliers were unable to meet the demand.  Accordingly the municipal authorities ordered buses from Tilling Stevens and four double decker buses with British registration plates were shipped to Barcelona in May 1922.  The Barcelona Municipal Museum notes that these were sent from the Maidstone factory to Folkestone to be shipped across the channel and then driven to Spain.  Additionally, British Pathe cameramen have recorded a single decker bus being loaded onto the cargo ship SS Quaysider at Folkestone.  This vessel was built in 1909 at North Shields for T Steam Coasters of Newcastle.  In 1913 it was sold to a shipping line based in Tenerife and subsequently ended up in various ports in Spain, including Barcelona, before being scrapped in 1973 at Cadiz.  It is possible that this particular shipment went directly to Spain via sea.  Tilling Stevens also supplied 108 buses to China for Hong Kong in the 1948 and cast die models of these are being made and sold today. 
Back to the mystery picture and the initial thoughts on the bus-on-a-crane was that this bus is being returned back from France after the Great War, or that a demonstrator is being sent to the Continent for an exhibition show or as a sales example to a potential client.
The war bus theory can be discounted as Tilling-Stevens petrol-electric buses were not taken up by the War Department. Also, the lifting crane is using a simple sling so that the upper deck has to be protected by shoving soft bags under the strop wires.  Normally these would be held out from the vehicle by a stretcher bar to prevent damage to superstructure of the bus. There are images of the same crane loading motorcars onto a ship with such a device.  A private motorcar is shown in a 1915 photograph being loaded from Folkestone south quay onto a steamer.  The car is strapped down onto a flat tray and lifted with a stretcher bar to keep the wire strops clear of the motor. This suggests that means of lifting vehicle in safety was known in Folkestone docks and that the task of lifting the bus was done at short notice or perhaps somebody had omitted to get the required equipment in place before hand. 
In Spain the need for providing a public transport infrastructure were aimed at facilitating the economic growth of the city. The popularity of buses soon outgrew the supply of local bus manufacturers. An order to Tilling Stevens in 1922 and 1924 was fulfilled by sending buses by sea and overland from Boulogne.  These buses were transhipped from Folkestone across the Channel.

My conclusion is that in the early 1920’s the South Eastern Railway is planning to increase the vehicle lifting capacity at the docks in preparation for trans-shipping of larger and heavier vehicles.  The Tilling Stevens bus company is preparing to export buses to the Continent to fulfil an order for buses from the Municipal Authorities of Spain. The picture shows a test of the loading of a heavy vehicle from the Folkestone quayside onto a ship berthed alongside.  In the absence of other information it is assumed that the Cowans & Sheldon railway breakdown crane of 1881 has been refurbished for this event and Tilling Stevens has provided a new bus from its factory in nearby Maidstone.


Sources of Reference and Acknowledgements:

1.  South Eastern and Chatham Railway Society, 1921, image of bus being lifted by crane at Folkestone.
2.  Chris Capewell, Breakdown Crane Association, 1881, information on early cranes at Folkestone.
3.  Chris Duncombe, Maidstone & District and East Kent Bus Club, information on Continental bus tours.
4.  Unknown contributors, Kent History Forum, information on the Tilling-Stevens bus company in Maidstone.
5.  Brian Hart, Folkestone’s Railways, 1915, image of motorcar being lifted by crane into a ship.
6.  Francis Brady, SER Chief Engineer, description of constructing new piers at Folkestone, The Engineer 1882, Graces Guide.
7.  Bus and Transport Museum, Wythall and Mike Davis, Hong Kong Buses - Kowloon Motor Bus, history of the Tilling-Stevens bus and information on orders from China.
8.  Transports Metropolitans de Barcelona, Transport Museum, 1924, historical information of the public bus services and delivery of Tilling-Stevens buses to Spain.
9.  Albert Gonzàlez Masip, ASSOTRAM, 1922, the delivery of Tilling-Stevens buses to Spain.
10.  Lorraine Senicle, The Dover Historian, 1926, image of Manchester tour bus being loaded onto a ship at Dover.
11.  London Bus Museum, Brooklands Museum, Chobham, history of buses in London.
12.  British Pathe, 1922, footage of bus being loaded onto SS Quaysider.
David,
Royal Navy, Aircraft Engineer, Project Manager, Yachtsman, Eroica Cyclist,  Railway Modeller

Offline CommanderChuff

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Re: Model of Folkestone Harbour railway
« Reply #7 on: February 06, 2018, 11:41:09 »
Gentlemen,

Thank you for the appreciations, they are very welcome.
David,
Royal Navy, Aircraft Engineer, Project Manager, Yachtsman, Eroica Cyclist,  Railway Modeller

Offline Dave Smith

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Re: Model of Folkestone Harbour railway
« Reply #6 on: February 02, 2018, 19:44:09 »
And many thanks from me too. I've always said that there is more joy in researching & in the making pf models than the actual finished article. And not just to the actual modeller either for there is a lot of spin off to other people. 

Offline Bilgerat

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Re: Model of Folkestone Harbour railway
« Reply #5 on: February 01, 2018, 08:58:00 »
Excellent, this kind of thing is exactly what the Forum needs.
"I did not say that the French will not come, I said they will not come by sea" - Lord St Vincent

Offline CommanderChuff

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Re: Model of Folkestone Harbour railway
« Reply #4 on: January 31, 2018, 17:38:55 »
The historical timeline of Folkestone harbour and it development is quite complicated so I thought that a brief summary would be useful so that items of modelling interest can be positioned in the correct period.

1846-1850: South Quay and Railway station built: two hand cranes with rotating swan neck jibs on four wheel rail trollies noted in 1887 in a photograph recording the departure of Queen Victoria from the south quay on the PS Victoria.

1949 Jan 01: Folkestone harbour branch line opened,

1857: SER builds the Stade on the north quay, using rails with slight batter 4ft 6in about as piles, faced with wood planks, infilled with rubble and topped with 5ft of concrete. Shingle is removed from the harbour entrance from time to time at the horn and used in ships as ballast.

1860: the south pier is extended for some years by the SER to keep ahead of the shingle build up. The shingle bank became a strong defensive wall, lighthouse was built on the horn.  The Harbour can berth 20 brigs and the SER channel steamers, the largest that can be berthed is Mary Beatrice, 266 ft, harbour is not a Port of Refuge as it dries out at low water and the space for anchoring outside the harbour is limited, a gridiron at 22 ft long can take a ship of 9 ft draught on a spring high tide.  A coal wharf to the south can take 1,000 tons of coal, a slipway at the north eastern end of the Stade is 450 ft long, 19 ft wide and gradient of 1:24, and engineering shed at the upper end can execute minor repairs to ships and machinery with six blacksmiths employed, some of the company’s carpenters are sheds close by.   Two repairing jetties run out from Stade, 300 men are employed at the harbour by the SER including six crews for the steamships, each with 24 men.

1861 – 1862: SER builds the low water landing timber pier from the south quay heading south east. A photo of the time shows a crane which is probably laying in rubble into the frame of the pier.

1871: Channel station built onto the south timber pier.

1881 – 1883: the SER harbour master is Captain Boxer RN.  SER builds stone extension to the south pier, which will cover the old timber pier and extend the pier head to 600ft, giving 18ft 7in at low water, 62ft 4in wide. Lower landing stages provided western end 280ft long x 20ft wide x 13ft high, and 400ft long at the eastern end, with gangway stairs 9ft wide, the new stone allows steamers to berth at any state of the tide allowing a fixed timetable for ships and trains.  The concrete blocks are 16 tons, 4ft 6in x 6ft x 9ft are built from ballast from SER quarries at Rye and sand from Gomshall (on the SER reading branch) topped with sand from Folkestone, and Portland cement. The blocks are lifted in by the yard engine and positioned underwater by two divers.  The pier has a 45 ft head with a 31 ft skeleton lighthouse with fog bell. Platforms are provided with columns at 15ft apart and 10in square carry a curved roof canopy, on the west side piles are driven in by two men on a windlass and infilled with rubble to provide a seawall.  During rough weather the yard engine is unable to carry concrete blocks to the works and can be used for pile driving by being connected to pile donkey with a chain over pulleys and running forwards to lift the weight.  A man releases the donkey onto the pile giving 15 blows in ten minutes, two piles per day.    Pop 15,398.

1897 – 1905: south Quay enlargement and second south pier extension:  The extension of the old pier by 900ft. of solid work, with the provision of four new berths available at all tides and in all weather; the protection of the west face of the old pier by a solid wall carried down to a secure foundation; the strengthening of the root of the pier by a wall founded on cylinders and protected by a wave-breaker of 10 ton blocks deposited pell-mell; the renewal of the east face of the old pier in greenheart piling, and the provision of a new deck throughout its length. The pier is provided with a sheltering parapet along the whole of the western side. The parapet covers the railway platforms, and provides a public promenade on the top. The main lines and Sidings on the pier are controlled by electric signalling, and the whole of the pier, landings, station buildings, &c., are lighted by electricity. The 900 ft long pier terminates in a roundhead 65ft. in diameter, upon which stands a granite lighthouse, exhibiting a fourth-order double-flashing light, and a foghorn house with air compressing machinery.   The new extension was built using 20 ton concrete blocks faced with granite.  Blocks are lifted in using two 20 ton Goliath cranes and positioned underwater by divers.  Diving bells are 16 tons and 13 x 10 x 6ft and are positioned by two 30 ton Goliaths.  These cranes are on staging 101 ft wide 400 ft long, and 21ft above the water level, being built on Oregon pine piles carrying lattice girders of 40ft span, and which covers the width and length of the construction.  There are slipways built into the pier for the handling of horses of which there is much traffic and four special cranes on travelling gantries for the lifting of passenger’s baggage.   The cranes were used for lifting luggage and baggage boxes of about 1 ton, and were gantry mounted on the pier or on railway trolleys on the pier and quayside.  These appeared in two steam powered versions, the housing of corrugated sheet was either pent roofed or curve roof. The gantry cranes were replaced by electric powered versions from about 1930. 

1910: Transhipment of motorcars:  x2 steam mobile railway breakdown cranes on four wheel trollies with corrugated housings.
1921: Transhipment of motor buses: x1 steam mobile railway crane on six wheel chassis with plate steel housing.
David,
Royal Navy, Aircraft Engineer, Project Manager, Yachtsman, Eroica Cyclist,  Railway Modeller

Offline CommanderChuff

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Re: Model of Folkestone Harbour railway
« Reply #3 on: January 29, 2018, 21:31:18 »
Dave,

Thanks for the appreciation, and they are indeed O gauge.
David,
Royal Navy, Aircraft Engineer, Project Manager, Yachtsman, Eroica Cyclist,  Railway Modeller

Offline Dave Smith

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Re: Model of Folkestone Harbour railway
« Reply #2 on: January 29, 2018, 18:37:23 »
C.C. In keeping with all that has gone before, attention to detail is fantastic! Even the Driver/Fireman look "right"- congrat's, again. Incidentally, is it O Gauge?

Offline CommanderChuff

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Model of Folkestone Harbour railway
« Reply #1 on: January 25, 2018, 09:48:38 »
Some images of the second train up the FFF incline.  The locos used on this test were built and painted by my late father, and to enternal shame are much better performers on the track.  The idea is to check that using two separate controllers for the lead and banker locos is a workable option, the aim being to maintian the momentum of the train up the hill by varying the power of the bankers. Just like the real things I suppose.
David,
Royal Navy, Aircraft Engineer, Project Manager, Yachtsman, Eroica Cyclist,  Railway Modeller

 

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