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Author Topic: M2 accident 1960s  (Read 646 times)

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Offline Mickleburgh

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Re: M2 accident 1960s
« Reply #3 on: August 02, 2018, 12:10:10 »
Many thanks. So, 5th July 1965, will now try and dig out the press reports of the time but does anyone know the name of the drunk driver? One overhead comment in the pub at the time was along the lines `knew him - not surprised`. Driving a Triumph `Herald` as well. I used to have one and certainly going head to head with a Humber `Snipe` would have had serious implications for ones health.

Offline Paolo

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Re: M2 accident 1960s
« Reply #2 on: August 02, 2018, 08:27:18 »

Offline Mickleburgh

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M2 accident 1960s
« Reply #1 on: August 01, 2018, 23:36:30 »
Not long after the M2 opened (summer 1963) there was a serious, nationally reported, accident when one night an inebriated driver was reported as driving down the wrong carriageway, a police patrol car being despatched to intercept. Unfortunately the driver had realised his mistake and crossed the central reservation, which was quite a common occurrence in those days, there being no barriers. Unfortunately, instead of continuing in the direction he had been going, he turned back the way he had come, ie, still the wrong way, and met the patrol car in a head on smash that killed two officers and the other driver.

Can anyone date this incident and any archive report thereof? Although motorways had then been in existence for some years, it is thought that this incident was a major factor in deciding the universal adoption of central barriers. It also probably influenced Barbara Castle in her bringing in the breathalyser law: it was thought at the time that no one with that much alcohol in their body could possibly still be alive!

 

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