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Author Topic: Isolation Hospitals  (Read 467 times)

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Offline davpott

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Re: Isolation Hospitals
« Reply #14 on: September 16, 2018, 11:48:08 »
Be careful over interpreting "fever flag".  The International Code of Signals (ICS) of 1934 established the modern convention that a single Q (quebec) flag means "my ship is healthy and I request free pratique".  However two Q flags means "my ship is suspect".  All vessels arriving from abroad should fly one or the other signals, but from observation few do.  I suspect that radio is used today. 

Prior to 1934 Q meant "my ship is suspect", the exact opposite of today!  Part of the reason for the change is that a ship not claiming to be healthy is assumed not to be so.

Flag L (lima) indicates that a vessel is actually in quarantine.

See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/International_Code_of_Signals for illustrations of quebec and lima.


That's the Q flag. It is flown on the starboard side by all vessels making its first landfall in a country. It is flown until it has been cleared by customs and immigration. Until all formalities have been completed no one is a lowed to board or leave the vessel.  Historically it is likely that vessels carrying sick crew or passengers may have had to remain in Quarantine until it had cleared up. ie. continue to fly the Q flag until the authorities were happy that there was no longer a  threat of disease coming ashore.     

Offline MartinR

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Re: Isolation Hospitals
« Reply #13 on: September 15, 2018, 22:44:43 »
Your memory is correct, Q is a plain yellow flag.  The launch attending a ship may well have been completing customs formalities or possibly just dealing with pilotage.  In the 1960s landsmen may well have been unaware of the 1934 regulations and the change they brought.  Still whatever you heard then, for the last 80 years a single Q flag indicates a healthy ship.  Please refer to Reed's Almanac or any relevant RYA publication for verification.  The current issue of the MCA's Ship Captain's Medical Guide requires the master to radio in advance if there is notifiable disease aboard, so Q flags are less important than previously.

To quote from the RYA Yachtmaster Manual:
Quote
When you require customs clearance for any reason, you should hoist the Q flag (plain yellow) once in territorial waters and keep it hoisted until formalities are complete.
  The rules for ships and yachts are the same.  By flying Q you are announcing that you are inbound from foreign parts and are healthy, hence requesting "free pratique" or communication with the shore.

Offline mmitch

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Re: Isolation Hospitals
« Reply #12 on: September 15, 2018, 21:19:01 »
I remember it as a yellow flag and people pointed it out and called it the 'fever flag.'
A couple of times I saw the launch attend a ship. May be just a check. There were still smallpox outbreaks in those days.
Even in the 1960s when I worked by the river occasionally you would hear people remark there had been a ship flying the flag.
mmitch.

Offline MartinR

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Re: Isolation Hospitals
« Reply #11 on: September 15, 2018, 10:57:39 »
Be careful over interpreting "fever flag".  The International Code of Signals (ICS) of 1934 established the modern convention that a single Q (quebec) flag means "my ship is healthy and I request free pratique".  However two Q flags means "my ship is suspect".  All vessels arriving from abroad should fly one or the other signals, but from observation few do.  I suspect that radio is used today. 

Prior to 1934 Q meant "my ship is suspect", the exact opposite of today!  Part of the reason for the change is that a ship not claiming to be healthy is assumed not to be so.

Flag L (lima) indicates that a vessel is actually in quarantine.

See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/International_Code_of_Signals for illustrations of quebec and lima.

Offline mmitch

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Re: Isolation Hospitals
« Reply #10 on: September 15, 2018, 09:42:45 »
In the 1950/60s on the Thames at Gravesend. There were two converted barges anchored at both ends by the shipping lane at which a launch was based. When a ship came up the river flying the 'fever flag' the launch would go and collect the casualty. They were examined on the barge before being taken by the launch to either Denton or later Joyce Green Isolation hospitals.
mmitch.

Offline HERB COLLECTOR

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Re: Isolation Hospitals
« Reply #9 on: September 14, 2018, 23:07:59 »
Joyce Green, Dartford.
It was built between 1901 and 1903 by the Metropolitan Asylums Board as a smallpox isolation hospital to replace the ships previously used for that purpose moored in the Thames nearby. It was later used for the hospitalization of patients with other infectious diseases such as diphtheria, scarlet fever, measles and whooping-cough. It ultimately became a general hospital as part of the NHS before finally closing and being demolished in 2000.
http://www.geograph.org.uk/photo/725215

Also at Dartford, two temporary hospitals, the Orchard, built 1901/2 to cope with a smallpox epidemic, and Long Reach, also built 1901. Also at Dartford the Mabledon, and The Southern.
See dartfordhospitalhistories.org.uk

Offline Local Hiker

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Re: Isolation Hospitals
« Reply #8 on: September 14, 2018, 21:42:11 »

Offline Longpockets

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Re: Isolation Hospitals
« Reply #7 on: September 14, 2018, 19:56:47 »
Hollingbourne Isolation Hospital for infectious diseases, Hospital Road. North of the A20 between Hollingbourne and Harrietsham, South of the railway line.

Offline zumiweb

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Re: Isolation Hospitals
« Reply #6 on: September 14, 2018, 15:52:52 »
St Williams Hospital in Rochester was an isolation hospital at one time. Demolished and now  the Wisdom Hospice in it's place.

Thank you, hadn't realised it started as 'infectious diseases'.

Offline zumiweb

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Re: Isolation Hospitals
« Reply #5 on: September 14, 2018, 15:46:45 »
There was an Infectious disease hospital off the east side of Fant Lane in Maidstone, where Abbots Field is now.

Got it! Thanks... presumably that's the later maternity hospital?

Offline Signals99

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Re: Isolation Hospitals
« Reply #4 on: September 14, 2018, 15:36:15 »
There was an isolation ward at Fort Clarence, for soldiers mostly returning from the Far East. Got a feeling it was titled "The Bastion Fever Hospital".

Offline Lyn L

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Re: Isolation Hospitals
« Reply #3 on: September 14, 2018, 15:16:53 »
St Williams Hospital in Rochester was an isolation hospital at one time. Demolished and now  the Wisdom Hospice in it's place.
Half our life is spent trying to find something to do with the time we have rushed through life tryi

Offline filmer01

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Re: Isolation Hospitals
« Reply #2 on: September 14, 2018, 14:08:14 »
There was an Infectious disease hospital off the east side of Fant Lane in Maidstone, where Abbots Field is now.
Illegitimus nil carborundum

Offline zumiweb

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Isolation Hospitals
« Reply #1 on: September 14, 2018, 11:10:13 »
I am part way through compiling a Gazetteer of Kent Hospitals, that's every hospital, open or closed. A few exclusions - wartime only (VAD), medieval hospitallers and general convalescent homes aren't part of this list, but isolation hospitals most definitely are. Here are the 29 I have identified so far, so my question is  - can you point out the ones I haven't found yet please? Most local history buffs are aware of 'their' local isolation hospital, but not all made it even as far as the Medical Officer of Health's annual reports. Any new additions welcomed! Any offers of photographs or other information equally welcomed. The aim is to have a book ready for printing mid-2019, but that depends on so much...


Beacon Hill Isolation Hospital, Faversham
Bekesbourne Lane, Canterbury
Bow Arrow Isolation Hospital
Bromley and Beckenham Joint Hospital for Infectious Diseases
Cheriton Isolation Hospital
Chiddingstone Joint Isolation Hospital
Denton Isolation Hospital
Dover Isolation Hospital
East Malling Hospital for Infectious Diseases
Eastry Hospital for Infectious diseases
Folkestone Smallpox Hospital / Sanatorium
Haine Hospital, Thanet
Herne Bay Isolation Hospital
Isle of Thanet Smallpox Hospital
Kennaways Isolation Hospital
Keycol Hospital
Loose Isolation Hospital
Lydd Isolation Hospital
Mill Hill Isolation Hospital, Deal
Milton Regis Infectious Diseases Hospital
Mount Hospital, Cantebury
Poulton Isolation Hospital, Dover
Seasalter Isolation Hospital
Sevenoaks Isolation Hospital
Tonbridge Isolation Hospital
Warren Isolation Hospital, Ashford
West Minster Isolation Hospital, Sheppey
Wigmore Isolation Hospital, Gillingham

Thanks in anticipation,
Mark
(librarian at William Harvey Hospital)

 

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