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Author Topic: Isolation Hospitals  (Read 412 times)

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Offline zumiweb

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Re: Isolation Hospitals
« Reply #28 on: Yesterday at 21:45:10 »
Click on the image file link just below the map for the full picture... I wasn't making it up, honest, it was Strood! I suppose every district put "it's" isolation hospital as far away as it could manage...

Hi mmitch,

Would that have been Strood isolation Hospital, as shown on the map here, do you think - just off the A2 / Watling Street...

Thanks,
Mark
I cannot see the wording as it is off the edge of the map but the general location is about right, but Strood that's about 5 miles away!
Thong village was nearer!
mmitch.

Offline mmitch

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Re: Isolation Hospitals
« Reply #27 on: Yesterday at 21:18:42 »
Hi mmitch,

Would that have been Strood isolation Hospital, as shown on the map here, do you think - just off the A2 / Watling Street...

Thanks,
Mark
I cannot see the wording as it is off the edge of the map but the general location is about right, but Strood that's about 5 miles away!
Thong village was nearer!
mmitch.


Offline zumiweb

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Re: Isolation Hospitals
« Reply #26 on: Yesterday at 13:36:52 »
Can find no information on this one near Otford - would this be listed as Sevenoaks?. The buildings still seem to exist but for some reason are blurred out on GSV.

Exactly that, see this excerpt from Fever Hospitals and Fever Nurses: A British Social History of Fever Nurses, a book by Margaret Currie (2005, p.63.). Click on the link below the image to see the full picture.

Also, "Wickham Field - This private road on the north side of Pilgrims Way West is the former local authority Isolation Hospital (1904), the main brick-built buildings, wards, etc., of which were converted into single-storey private dwellings and twostoreyflats c1960" from https://www.otford.info/

Offline smiffy

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Re: Isolation Hospitals
« Reply #25 on: Yesterday at 13:06:03 »
Can find no information on this one near Otford - would this be listed as Sevenoaks?. The buildings still seem to exist but for some reason are blurred out on GSV.

Offline zumiweb

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Re: Isolation Hospitals
« Reply #24 on: Yesterday at 12:12:43 »
Hi mmitch,

Would that have been Strood isolation Hospital, as shown on the map here, do you think - just off the A2 / Watling Street...

Thanks,
Mark

Just remembered there was a 'isolation hospital' off Valley drive, Gravesend.  It was derelict in the 1940s. I found this reference on another thread.
 http://www.kenthistoryforum.co.uk/index.php?topic=3207.75
The warren is still an open space. As we walked along the then narrow lane towards the A2 passed the Warren there were wood and brick buildings some of which were probably the RAF sick quarters. Certainly my family called it the old isolation hospital.
mmitch.

Offline mmitch

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Re: Isolation Hospitals
« Reply #23 on: Yesterday at 10:43:39 »
Just remembered there was a 'isolation hospital' off Valley drive, Gravesend.  It was derelict in the 1940s. I found this reference on another thread.
 http://www.kenthistoryforum.co.uk/index.php?topic=3207.75
The warren is still an open space. As we walked along the then narrow lane towards the A2 passed the Warren there were wood and brick buildings some of which were probably the RAF sick quarters. Certainly my family called it the old isolation hospital.
mmitch.

Offline smiffy

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Re: Isolation Hospitals
« Reply #22 on: September 17, 2018, 20:26:04 »
White Oak Hospital, Swanley. Originally for children who were suffering from contagious diseases of the eyes, skin and scalp.

Offline smiffy

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Re: Isolation Hospitals
« Reply #21 on: September 17, 2018, 12:15:39 »
Fant Lane:

Offline zumiweb

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Re: Isolation Hospitals
« Reply #20 on: September 17, 2018, 09:10:27 »
And there I was thinking I'd found them all, or nearly all! Thanks for the pointers, and of course the reminder that many other hospitals started as isolation and infectious diseases. I was too focused on cottage sized isolation hospitals in my mental definition, but of course there were some enormous ones (and wards & blocks in other 'normal' hospitals). And the Dartford fever hospitals story is a whole epic of its own (with a couple of good books by Francine Payne to fill in the detail), with fever ships, river ambulances and large sites taking London's patients safely out of the way (safely for London at least, not necessarily for the patients or for Kent). A bit more work to do, this forum is full of knowledge as always!

Offline zumiweb

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Re: Isolation Hospitals
« Reply #19 on: September 17, 2018, 09:04:01 »

Thank you - I knew of the Hollingbourne one, but no idea where it was... found it now, just half a mile or so North East of Leeds Castle...

Quote
The Hollingbourne hospital is hidden in woods, the Lenham Sanitorium was the one visible from the A20 just past Lenham, where the Pilgrims Way crosses Rayners Hill which runs up to Warren Street. That was a convalescent home I believe.

Offline filmer01

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Re: Isolation Hospitals
« Reply #18 on: September 17, 2018, 08:16:22 »
I know of the Fant Lane hospital as we used to have a shop at the top of Western Road (actually two in the end), and my business partner was a local who did call it the old Fever Hospital. Later used as a maternity unit, I think.

The Hollingbourne hospital is hidden in woods, the Lenham Sanitorium was the one visible from the A20 just past Lenham, where the Pilgrims Way crosses Rayners Hill which runs up to Warren Street. That was a convalescent home I believe.
Illegitimus nil carborundum

Offline Dave Smith

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Re: Isolation Hospitals
« Reply #17 on: September 16, 2018, 19:29:06 »
filmer01. I wonder whether that hospital in Fant Lane was what they called " the Fever Hospital" in Maidstone? In 1937/38 my wife went there with scarlet fever & was the only child (8) there. No visitors so she was very lonely but the nurses were very good.

Offline Dave Smith

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Re: Isolation Hospitals
« Reply #16 on: September 16, 2018, 19:10:03 »
In the 40'/50's the Hollingbourne Isolation Hospital was used for tuberculosis patients. In those days, fresh air- & plenty of it- was the only treatment. Hence, the wards all faced South with double doors opening onto a balcony where patients in their beds where wheeled out to " enjoy" the sun, wind, rain & snow almost every day. They could be seen from the Ashford Road( A20).

Offline Bilgerat

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Re: Isolation Hospitals
« Reply #15 on: September 16, 2018, 14:14:39 »
Joyce Green, Dartford.
It was built between 1901 and 1903 by the Metropolitan Asylums Board as a smallpox isolation hospital to replace the ships previously used for that purpose moored in the Thames nearby. It was later used for the hospitalization of patients with other infectious diseases such as diphtheria, scarlet fever, measles and whooping-cough. It ultimately became a general hospital as part of the NHS before finally closing and being demolished in 2000.
http://www.geograph.org.uk/photo/725215

Also at Dartford, two temporary hospitals, the Orchard, built 1901/2 to cope with a smallpox epidemic, and Long Reach, also built 1901. Also at Dartford the Mabledon, and The Southern.
See dartfordhospitalhistories.org.uk


See here:

http://www.kenthistoryforum.co.uk/index.php?topic=14487

Just noticed the missing pictures. I'll find those and replace them when I get five minutes.
"I did not say that the French will not come, I said they will not come by sea" - Lord St Vincent

Offline davpott

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Re: Isolation Hospitals
« Reply #14 on: September 16, 2018, 11:48:08 »
Be careful over interpreting "fever flag".  The International Code of Signals (ICS) of 1934 established the modern convention that a single Q (quebec) flag means "my ship is healthy and I request free pratique".  However two Q flags means "my ship is suspect".  All vessels arriving from abroad should fly one or the other signals, but from observation few do.  I suspect that radio is used today. 

Prior to 1934 Q meant "my ship is suspect", the exact opposite of today!  Part of the reason for the change is that a ship not claiming to be healthy is assumed not to be so.

Flag L (lima) indicates that a vessel is actually in quarantine.

See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/International_Code_of_Signals for illustrations of quebec and lima.


That's the Q flag. It is flown on the starboard side by all vessels making its first landfall in a country. It is flown until it has been cleared by customs and immigration. Until all formalities have been completed no one is a lowed to board or leave the vessel.  Historically it is likely that vessels carrying sick crew or passengers may have had to remain in Quarantine until it had cleared up. ie. continue to fly the Q flag until the authorities were happy that there was no longer a  threat of disease coming ashore.     

 

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