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Author Topic: Belton's, Sandwich  (Read 439 times)

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Offline smiffy

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Re: Belton's, Sandwich
« Reply #4 on: August 07, 2019, 13:31:37 »
No idea when that happened, Longpockets. it looks like it may be a bit more recent to me, but I could be wrong. Perhaps there are some old photographs showing this area a bit later in the 20th century that could answer that question.

Offline Longpockets

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Re: Belton's, Sandwich
« Reply #3 on: August 07, 2019, 07:19:07 »
I wonder when they carved up the Georgian windows and added the tile hanging to the building next door. Victorianisation?

Offline Invicta Alec

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Re: Belton's, Sandwich
« Reply #2 on: August 06, 2019, 21:17:00 »
A fascinating and interesting post smiffy.

Thank you.

Alec.

Offline smiffy

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Belton's, Sandwich
« Reply #1 on: August 06, 2019, 20:04:21 »
The thread I started about this some years ago is one that mysteriously went missing. This being the case, I thought I would post a bit about this again as I believe it might be of some interest to those who know the area or may even live close by. It shows how difficult it can be sometimes to track down the location of old photographs, as there can be so much rebuilding or modification of existing buildings in the intervening years (assuming they haven't been demolished) that it becomes hard to tell if they are actually still the same property.

The upper photo shown here, which was taken in about 1880, shows my great-grandfather James Belton's business premises which i knew was located somewhere in Strand Street, Sandwich. After some help from other members, this was narrowed down to the Pillory Gate area and it eventually became possible to pin down the location to the modern view below, which is the closest I can get using google street view. It's evident that quite a bit of modification has happened over the years, but it would appear that the underlying structure is still present.



The little girl in the centre of the upper photograph would be my grandmother, who lived from the Victorian period into the modern era and who died shortly before her hundredth birthday.

 

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