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Author Topic: St Clement's Rochester  (Read 4329 times)

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Offline smiffy

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Re: St Clement's Rochester
« Reply #22 on: June 26, 2018, 01:37:33 »
As we have discovered, Horsewash/St.Clements Lane has been there for centuries, but for all intents and purposes now appears to have ceased to exist.

Offline conan

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Re: St Clement's Rochester
« Reply #21 on: June 26, 2018, 00:19:24 »
To remain ignorant of what happened before you were born is to remain a child......Cicero

Offline Greyuncle

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Re: St Clement's Rochester
« Reply #20 on: June 25, 2018, 23:24:58 »
Smiffy there was an old mortuary down there as well.  Demolished not to many years ago.

Offline smiffy

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Re: St Clement's Rochester
« Reply #19 on: June 25, 2018, 22:19:44 »
Greyuncle, I thought that this area was all scrap metal yards and the Corporation depot - I've never heard of a knackers yard being there.

Offline Greyuncle

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Re: St Clement's Rochester
« Reply #18 on: June 25, 2018, 15:31:00 »
The Pub I used in those days was the Gundulph, and Horsewash Lane was right along side it. It had a cannon at the top.  As a boy from Strood I remember  in the fifties seeing horses being driven down there. What I wasn't told that they were going to the Nackers yard. Thanks Roseann for bring that area back to memory.

Offline Roseann

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Re: St Clement's Rochester
« Reply #17 on: June 25, 2018, 09:28:52 »
That all fits in well as it was when they were building the railway bridge they came across remains, there is a picture of it as foundations and an arch but I have lost them. In another piece of writing it says that certain stones were re-used in other buildings in Rochester.
Hope x

Offline MartinR

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Re: St Clement's Rochester
« Reply #16 on: June 24, 2018, 21:53:39 »
A few photos I took of the area earlier today:
  • The view along "The Common" towards Horsewash Lane.  Horsewash starts at the point the road bends left.
  • Why I couldn't get closer!
  • The view back along Horsewash lane from the end of Rochester Bridge.  The lane is to the left of the wall in the distance.
  • More council obstructionism.
  • To the left of the gate.  The area dead ahead is the site of St. Clements.
  • A view from further back showing the gate blocking off Horsewash lane and the site of St. Clements.

Offline MartinR

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Re: St Clement's Rochester
« Reply #15 on: June 23, 2018, 15:41:20 »
The link Herb Collector supplied to the "Rochester Archaeological Assessment Document" has the solution.  The Saxon plan components map (number 18) on page 97 shows St. Clements as the red rectangle number 15 next to the Saxon Bridge.  It's right below the railway.  The next plan, Medieval plan components, on page 99 still shows St. Clements (number 22, still red).  By the time of the "Post-medieval plan components" it had disappeared and Henry VIII's "Long Warehouse" had been built alongside the creek and to the south of Horsewash lane.  I suspect that this reinforces the fording point suggestion.

Offline Roseann

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Hope x

Offline smiffy

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Re: St Clement's Rochester
« Reply #13 on: June 22, 2018, 23:16:27 »
Interestingly, there was an actual horse-wash in Hull were horses were taken for a dip in the Humber. The ramp they used is still there.

Offline MartinR

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Re: St Clement's Rochester
« Reply #12 on: June 22, 2018, 22:11:45 »
Sorry Smiffy, I don't think there was any valeting going on.  Wash ultimately has the meaning of "to get wet", which for humans and clothes will mean cleansing.  For low lying land and creeks it refers to land that is sometimes dry, sometimes covered with water.*  The maps at the back of the Rochester Archaeological Assessment Document linked to by Herb Collector clearly show a creek just outside the city walls, see in particular the Duke of Northumberland's map of 1633 (page 75).  I'd guess that the horse wash was a ford across the creek which was passable on horseback, but not on foot.  Possibly only at low tide, or alternatively fordable at high tide on horseback.

*Compare the Nene or Ouse washes, or indeed The Wash which used to be low lying swamp prior to reclamation.

Offline smiffy

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Re: St Clement's Rochester
« Reply #11 on: June 22, 2018, 20:51:12 »
It's interesting how a single post can bring to life a thread that's lain dormant for nearly nine years!

Judging by this map from 1866 it looks like St. Clement's was on the north side of the lane and any remains were indeed destroyed when the railway line was constructed.

It's odd how the lane changed names back and forth over the years - it seems that Horsewash may have been the original one. I'd like to know the origin of the name, perhaps there used to be the medieval equivalent of a car valeting service here - your horse washed while you wait :)

Offline HERB COLLECTOR

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Re: St Clement's Rochester
« Reply #10 on: June 22, 2018, 19:01:40 »
Here is a description of what was visible of St Clements church in 1798. From The History and Topographical Survey of the County of Kent: Volume 4.

A considerable part of the walls of this church is still remaining, at the entrance from the High-street into the lane formerly called St. Clement's, but now called Horsewash-lanc. The east end, or chancel, is visible; the south wall, or part of it, is now the front of three houses almost in a line northward from Bridge-lane, and the north wall forms the back of these houses. The width of the church does not appear to have been above forty feet. There was in it a row of pillars and arches, extending from east to west, at about fourteen from the north wall, making a narrow isle; two of these pillars and one arch are still to be seen, in one of the houses above mentioned.

St Clements Lane was renamed Horsewash Lane sometime in the latter part of the 19th century.

And before St Clements Lane was called St Clements Lane it was called Horsewash Lane!
The bridge wardens map of Rochester made in 1717, see fig 9 in link below, show it as Horfwafh Lane, while a map of 1772, fig 11, shows it as St Clements Lane.

Rochester Archaeological Assessment Document.
http://archaeologydataservice.ac.uk/archiveDS/archiveDownload?t=arch-459-1/dissemination/pdf/Rochester.pdf

Offline MartinR

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Re: St Clement's Rochester
« Reply #9 on: June 22, 2018, 17:53:05 »
Thanks for that Herb Collector.  I've only had a chance to skim the report, but it appears that the walls Numanfan photographed were indeed the medieval city walls built on a Roman base.  Kyn's press cutting confirms what I've always understood, that the remains of the church of St. Clements were obliterated by the building of the viaduct.  Note that the houses were being taken down to "form one of the approaches to the new bridge", so presumably the arch was in the path of progress!

Offline HERB COLLECTOR

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Re: St Clement's Rochester
« Reply #8 on: June 21, 2018, 23:04:29 »
This may help.
An Archaeological Evaluation at PB Site, Horse Wash Lane, Rochester.
http://www.archaeologyse.co.uk/ReportLibrary/2008/2008075-3217-PB-Horsewash-Lane-Rochester-EV-Approved.pdf

 

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