News: The modern name of Kent is derived from the Brythonic word kantos meaning "rim" or "border", or possibly from a homonymous word kanto "horn, hook"
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Author Topic: Strood Incident..  (Read 40039 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

AdrianPearce

  • Guest
Re: Strood Incident..
« Reply #30 on: March 07, 2016, 01:40:21 »
Re cesspits - sorry but I have no further info re the ones at West Street. However, it is not uncommon for toilets to be connected to old mine shafts as they take a lot more waste than normal cesspits. I have memories of descending holes and finding sewer pipes sticking out!

KeithJG

  • Guest
Re: Strood Incident..
« Reply #29 on: March 04, 2016, 12:10:54 »
Upon reading the Frindsbury pdf. item ....all of it, I might add, took me ages but really interesting as I lived there from 8yrs old.

In the pdf. somewhere it does mention that the house, 2 West Street, where the hole appeared in the alley at the rear of the house, that the outside toilets of all these houses shared one cesspit so maybe it was this that caused all the problems as I suppose it was filled in as these houses now have internal toilets?

It may even be that the internal toilets still go into the sewer pipes at the bottom of each garden as the opposite alley apparently had subsidence occur?

Maybe AdrianPearce has a better description?

Offline Signals99

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 514
  • Appreciation 39
Re: Strood Incident..
« Reply #28 on: March 03, 2016, 17:59:59 »
Question.  The bottom of the hole the unfortunate lady fell into is referred to as a 'culvert'. Does this imply it was man, if so it opens up many areas of speculation?

AdrianPearce

  • Guest
Re: Strood Incident..
« Reply #27 on: March 02, 2016, 02:27:42 »
Keith

Many thanks for the information on the filled/covered well. It may have been a mine shaft or just a well, there is no way of telling now. It is a long time ago now but I can vaguely remember a rumour at the time about a shaft covered by a concrete floor. My informant did not know anything definite but it may have been the same one.

As a matter of interest, the dynamic probe tests were not done by KURG but by a contractor the council engaged.

Adrian

KeithJG

  • Guest
Re: Strood Incident..
« Reply #26 on: March 01, 2016, 17:19:12 »
Very useful information as I do read the pdf. of Frindsbury etc.

I have one piece of information for you which only a few know of and that is, when Kent Underground Research Group were doing the Dynamic Probe Tests they missed a nearby well / hole because it was built over?

Numbers 40, 42, 44 etc. were new in 1956 as I lived at 42 Billstreet and we were the owners from new. I sold it just 30 months ago as I inherited it when my Stepmother died.

It is true that all of these Estates have concrete floors. I expect to help stop any subsidence in the actual houses.

Where the missed well is because the garage has a concrete floor also.

I have edited one of your pages so that I can tell you where exactly it is or was?

As you can see number 13 was the closest you could get because of the garage, green lines our garage also.

The backway or concrete strips as you probably know went all the way to Hilltop Road amongst others and each house owned their part of it right out to the boundary fences.

So number 40 being at the end it was obvious no one could drive past so he built his garage on the strips.

Before this was built I used to play there and the well in the corner was a proper one with bricks laid all around the top face and was filled in to the brim.

All was safe of course as when the garage was assembled it was on a solid concrete base.

Excuse the car in the photo taken in 1965 as my mate was visiting but you can see the concrete driveway strips and the boundary fence on the left. Beyond the fence you can see the end gable of the house in Bingham Road which had a catastophic subsidence in the back garden and the alley described further back in the newpaper cuttings.

AdrianPearce

  • Guest
Re: Strood Incident..
« Reply #25 on: March 01, 2016, 00:57:48 »
A user called "the 2nd" posted a link to my article on Frindsbury Mine at http://shropshiremines.org.uk/kurg/frindsbury.htm
but this has now been replaced by the following link :-

http://shropshirehistory.com/misc/frindsbury.pdf

It is in pdf format so it is easier to download and read. In July 1990, the Council paid contractors to excavate a filled shaft near West Street. They went down about 100ft to a chamber which I was lucky enough to go down and inspect. It had the classic arched shape of a pillar and stall chalk mine (see photo).

I recommended that they excavate horizontally to the east where I believed the chalk mine under Frindsbury Brickfield lay and where the ground radar tests (see my article) showed voids. Unfortunately, they ignored this and excavated to the west and found nothing. This was not surprising since this direction was where the washbacks were and they would not have risked mining underneath them in case a subsidence flooded the mine. Hey ho. I have no doubt that further subsidences will occur in future.

http://www.kenthistoryforum.co.uk/index.php?topic=2115.15

KeithJG

  • Guest
Re: Strood Incident..
« Reply #24 on: October 01, 2014, 14:01:05 »
My family home was exactly opposite Randolph Cottages on Bill Street Road where the alley with that hole was at right angles to the cottages. So the hole which caved in was only about 70yds from my bedroom which was at the front of the house on the main Road.

As said, they never did find Mrs.Thompson even after putting a coloured dye down the hole into the stream to see where it came out further down the hill in Strood but they never found the exit!

I do remember the filling in with cement, it went day and night continuous for about 5 or 6 days. It was the noise that kept us all awake with the large cement lorries with the turning container on the back and the cement going down the chute.

It was always on my mind after this incident if my feet would give way....quite worrying, until one gets used to living with it.

Here is some reading and if the link is ok a long document explaining all about that Frindsbury area. It took me about an hour or so but you can skip parts to find it more interesting further on.

http://shropshirehistory.com/misc/frindsbury.htm

Apparently our house was on the site where the steam engine was and there is a picture of a man at the shed. Strange all these years later I could of been standing next to him!

The map shows where the hole is, red dot on the left and where my bedroom was, red dot on the right. I was 19 yrs in 1967

Sydney Invicta

  • Guest
Re: Strood Incident..
« Reply #23 on: May 27, 2013, 01:30:56 »
We were also family friends and lived close to the site. We had the little boy stay with us frequently after the event (in fact he shared my room) and his dad still keeps in touch with my mum today.

The incident left us kids living in fear as the terrace houses in that part of Frindsbury were linked by back alleyways that we used everyday to get from A to B. I remember before the accident that the paths in a few alleys produced a hollow noise when jumped on, and we used to stamp our feet to produce it for fun (needless to say, we didn't do it again afterwards). 


sandynan46

  • Guest
Re: Strood Incident..
« Reply #22 on: May 19, 2013, 18:10:48 »
I also remember this incident being reported, I lived in Rochester at the time. I have just looked at the video of the fireman`s account of the incident and have tears in my eyes.  You cannot imagine such a thing happening and the fear and danger that these courageous firemen went through.  How awful to have been able to see the poor lady yet be physically unable to reach her.  In those days I guess there was no counselling for ptsd (post traumatic stress disorder) they just had to get on with it, it is part of the job.  We do not appreciate enough the dangers these brave men face on a daily basis.  Thankyou seems so little, but its the best I have.  THANKYOU.

kevin payne

  • Guest
Re: Strood Incident..
« Reply #21 on: November 16, 2012, 18:36:38 »
Hi rochester bred, yes very tragic, although my parents became friends with the lady's widower and child a few years the incident, nonetheless, very sad!

Rochester-bred

  • Guest
Re: Strood Incident..
« Reply #20 on: November 14, 2012, 09:32:18 »
 kevin payne, I was at school at English Martyrs Primary on Frindsbury Hill when this happened, it must of been terrible for her family and your parents.

kevin payne

  • Guest
Re: Strood Incident..
« Reply #19 on: November 13, 2012, 21:37:13 »
Forgive me if I have stated this before, but the widower and the young son of this poor lady were friends of my parents; very tragic.

Offline smiler

  • Established Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 970
  • Appreciation 64
  • Far better to be screwed up than screwed down
Re: Strood Incident..
« Reply #18 on: April 03, 2012, 12:17:24 »
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=enzBGW__HUQ

This is a personal account of the rescue by one of the firemen from Strood who attended the incident.
Very interesting, I remember this very well as I was living on Frindsbury Rd. about 200yds from the accident.
Appreciated.

Offline afsrochester

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 587
  • Appreciation 36
Re: Strood Incident..
« Reply #17 on: April 03, 2012, 09:35:30 »
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=enzBGW__HUQ

This is a personal account of the rescue by one of the firemen from Strood who attended the incident.

Rochester-bred

  • Guest
Re: Strood Incident..
« Reply #16 on: January 08, 2012, 12:15:38 »
Having gone to school in Frindsbury as a child back in the 60s, my siblings and I knew all about the Dene holes that existed underneath a lot of the area because of the chalk. Here is a link which may go part way into Dene Holes ...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Denehole

 

BloQcs design by Bloc
SMF 2.0.11 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines