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Author Topic: Submarines in the Medway  (Read 40781 times)

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Offline AMD

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Re: Submarines in the Medway
« Reply #34 on: October 17, 2017, 10:13:21 »
Yes, that sounds right, as I had the name of the company from another source. Many thanks!

Offline mikeb

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Re: Submarines in the Medway
« Reply #33 on: October 17, 2017, 09:54:19 »
Albert Batchelor Ltd operated a cement works at Halling  1911-1931 known as Clinkham Works. Could be?

Offline AMD

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Re: Submarines in the Medway - and submarine engines in Southend
« Reply #32 on: October 17, 2017, 08:15:35 »
Regarding U122, UB76 and UB93, can anybody suggest a reading for the illegible part of ‘[…]kham Cement Works, Halling, Nr Rochester’, the location of their original buyer in 1920 (see my earlier post)?

A bit further away from the Medway, but still in Kent, Southend Corporation acquired four ex-U-Boat engines in 1919 - two from U100 and two from U164 (hulls both broken up in Swansea: at this point, the RN were selling engines separately). Does anyone know to what use they were put? One's initial suspicion would be a power station (similar engines ended up in one in York), but it would be nice to have some confirmation.

Offline AMD

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Re: Submarines in the Medway
« Reply #31 on: October 16, 2017, 23:48:44 »
Thanks!

Offline conan

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Re: Submarines in the Medway
« Reply #30 on: October 16, 2017, 23:41:29 »
Shrunk to usable size  :)

To remain ignorant of what happened before you were born is to remain a child......Cicero

Offline AMD

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Re: Submarines in the Medway
« Reply #29 on: October 16, 2017, 21:27:26 »
Sorry it's a bit big - not too good at this kind of posting .....

Offline kyn

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Re: Submarines in the Medway
« Reply #28 on: October 16, 2017, 21:23:37 »
That is brilliant, thank you!  :)

Offline AMD

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Re: Submarines in the Medway
« Reply #27 on: October 16, 2017, 20:31:24 »
Here it is - from the UK Hydrographic Office.

The results of this research should all appear in a book on the post-war fate of surrendered German warships.

Offline kyn

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Re: Submarines in the Medway
« Reply #26 on: October 14, 2017, 11:58:36 »
Are you able to post this document for others please?

Offline AMD

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Re: Submarines in the Medway - CORRECTION
« Reply #25 on: October 14, 2017, 10:54:03 »
I have just belatedly realised that I made a rather important transcription error in my earlier posting on the identity of the U-boat wrecks - it is not U122 but U112. There is absolutely no doubt on this - I have now found an original Admiralty record that confirms that the 'real' U122 was scuttled in deep water in the English Channel on 1 July 1921.

My apologies!

Offline MartinR

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Re: Submarines in the Medway
« Reply #24 on: August 13, 2017, 00:11:08 »
I visited U122 for the first time today but haven't got good photos.  We were a bit late leaving Commodore's Hard and in consequence arrived at West Bulwark just at high tide.  Being unfamiliar with the waters we went in but only stayed for about 5 minutes before leaving, possibly over-cautious since it was a 6m spring.  At high water there is not a lot to see.  If anyone else is planning the trip I suggest being at West Bulwark as early in the tide as possible and following the flood in.  Navigation was by Imray chart 2100.4, Google Maps and Garmin 78S.

Offline Signals99

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Re: Submarines in the Medway
« Reply #23 on: March 29, 2017, 00:25:09 »
Re First World War submarine engines . My ex wife worked at the Majestic/Gaumont cinema for a fairly long time, so I got to know some of the staff fairly well. .One gentleman, a Mr Taylor was positive that the emergency diesel generator housed in a separate room at the end of an alley, situated between the cinema and Hobdays pram and toy shop, was originally from a German submarine scrapped at Upnor.  l did see the unit once, "Siemens gmbh" was a name on some of the bits of stuff mounted there. I can't say if any of this was fact or fiction, I can only verify that the engine room existed.

Offline AMD

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Re: Submarines in the Medway
« Reply #22 on: March 19, 2017, 14:15:04 »
Apropos the identity of the Medway U-boats, I have been able to consult the Admiralty's sales ledger for 1919-1939, which includes all ex-German submarines sold by Britain after WW1, and which unambiguously resolves the issue of those acquired by the cement works for their engines - although leaving some issues of individual.

U122 (NOT UB122), UB76 and UB93 are listed as sold to M. Lynch & Son on 7 September 1920 (for £1,000, £1,500 and £1,000 respectively), for ‘[…]kham Cement Works, Halling, Nr Rochester’, Lynch also having acquired UB133, UB136 (for £1,000 each), UB144, UB145 and UB150 (for £2,000 each) on 22 July – making the requisite eight boats. Not only this, but the ledger expressly notes ‘Hull dumped 1922’ for UB144, UB145 and UB150. Of the other five, U122, UB76 and UB93 were re-sold to Upnor Shipbreaking on 25 October 1922, and UB133 and UB136 to T.W. Ward in the same year.

Regarding the precise identification of the three currently-visible wrecks, the apparent size of the ‘big’ wreck would indicate that it is indeed U122, as has often been suggested.  If so, it might suggest that the other two hulks might be the other two Upnor boats, likewise only partly dismantled in situ before being abandoned; on the other hand, the explicitly ‘dumped’ UB144, UB145 and UB150 must also be candidates, especially as the two Slede hulks were largely intact until cut down around 1940.

These findings have been shared with Historic England, and will be included in a forthcoming paper on the post-WW1 fate of ex-German submarines, and a projected book on surrendered ex-enemy vessels of both World Wars.

Offline Sentinel S4

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Re: Submarines in the Medway
« Reply #21 on: January 10, 2014, 21:25:42 »
WOW! That film is just AWESOME! I want one of those in my back garden, if the Trailer would allow me. Thanks for posting the link I really enjoyed that. I wonder if Ebay have one for sale.........

S4.
A day without learning something is a day lost and my brain is hungry. Feed me please.

Offline HERB COLLECTOR

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Re: Submarines in the Medway
« Reply #20 on: January 10, 2014, 20:55:25 »
As posted in the news section of the forum the Humble Bee Creek U-boat has been identified by English Heritage as probably UB 122.

The vessel alongside is most likely the Swale, a 37 ton sailing barge built in 1864. The barge belonged to Brice's, who operated the nearby Stoke Mud Hole, where clay was dug out for cement manufacture. (ATB 36)

The other two U-boats at Sled Creek are probably UB 76 and UB 93.

After the Battle number 36 is required reading for anyone interested in the Medway U-boats, copies are still available from afterthebattle.com.


"Mr. J. R. Kerr, who was then a small boy, recalled to me how he would earn a penny-and a look at a former U-boat engine in action-by delivering the Sunday dinner of the engineer on duty at the Municipal Power Station at Gillingham."

And this is what he would have seen.
MAN F6V35 World War 1 U-boat diesel engine load run, early 2013.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5opnhfG35zo

 

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