News: In 1834 a 13 metre long Iguanadon fossil was found in Queen’s Road in Maidstone
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Author Topic: Folkstone Harbour.  (Read 14707 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline howard

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 212
  • Appreciation 7
Re: Folkstone Harbour.
« Reply #15 on: January 05, 2012, 08:13:28 »

Please beg, borrow or the other (I can't commend the last part of that phrase) a copy of Boat Trains and Channel Packets, by Rixon Bucknall. Not only is it easy to read but full of info on both Folkestone and Dover Harbours and developement, not to mention the Rail aspect.

Regards, Sentinel S4.
There are 14 copies available on Amazon, from £4.99. I bought one a few months ago, having realised that the one I bought for 50p in the 1970s was missing, lent and not returned I think.

Offline Sentinel S4

  • Established Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1946
  • Appreciation 154
Re: Folkstone Harbour.
« Reply #14 on: January 04, 2012, 18:43:52 »
Folkestone Harbour was developed by the South Eastern Railway in direct competition to Dover. The 'Tram' in Tram Road refers to the railway that was laid at ground level for most of the run, like a traditional Tram, there never were what we think of as Trams in Folkestone. The lines on the North side of the Harbour was connected to the main viaduct at the site of the original Harbour Station, out on the viaduct at the end of the swing bridge. This (the swing bridge) was a later addition and put in when work started on reclaiming the shingle spit. The viaduct is level with the the harbour walls about halfway across so the line from the North side only looks like it climbs up the side of the viaduct, an optical illusion. This section of the viaduct is also on the level because of the short lived station that was there. I understand that Horses and Man power was the order of the day. The railway had some sidings there for rolling stock storage as well as the interchange with the lines on the North side, hence all of the piling to widen the brickwork (yes the brick viaduct is in there some where).
 
Please beg, borrow or the other (I can't commend the last part of that phrase) a copy of Boat Trains and Channel Packets, by Rixon Bucknall. Not only is it easy to read but full of info on both Folkestone and Dover Harbours and developement, not to mention the Rail aspect.

Regards, Sentinel S4.
A day without learning something is a day lost and my brain is hungry. Feed me please.

Far away

  • Guest
Re: Folkstone Harbour.
« Reply #13 on: January 04, 2012, 15:42:28 »
I have learnt from another thread that the metal structure, or grid-iron, was to do boat maintenance on. Probably very useful when there is no dry dock available locally.

Offline TowerWill

  • Established Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1197
  • Appreciation 29
Re: Folkstone Harbour.
« Reply #12 on: April 18, 2011, 16:37:38 »
Glad to hear that Far away!I see that bit of a pier has gone from the railway viaduct too.Some sort of metal structure next to it which rather looks like it's resting on the sea bed.

Far away

  • Guest
Re: Folkstone Harbour.
« Reply #11 on: April 18, 2011, 10:38:57 »
Wow, TowerWill, that photo has made my day!  :)

I can see that this photo shows the slipway has been extended to its present shape, different to that shown in the 1906 map, so I assume that the photo is more recent.

Now all I would like to see is exactly what run those rails...

Offline TowerWill

  • Established Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1197
  • Appreciation 29
Re: Folkstone Harbour.
« Reply #10 on: April 12, 2011, 18:11:56 »

From "Kent and the Cinque Ports" by H.R.Pratt Boorman MBE,MA,FJI.The Harbour long before the present day Burstin Hotel was built as i bought this book in 1966.

Far away

  • Guest
Re: Folkstone Harbour.
« Reply #9 on: April 12, 2011, 13:36:41 »
I see on the map by DoverDan that the pier is also marked as a viaduct. On this postcard I reckon that the viaduct is hidden by a wooden superstructure, forming the pier.



Pity that this is not the side we are interested in. However, on the Bing map image below we can see the brick-built start of the slope the 'fish railway' woud have taken to get up onto the pier - there is some building on it now, presumably part of the cafe?

http://www.bing.com/maps/?where1=the%20street%20kingston,GB&FORM=MMREDIR#map=51.17002,0.89144|20|256&be=7604704|North&bd=useful_information&loc=GB:51.16915:0.89089:14|kennington|Kennington,%20Ashford,%20Kent,%20England,%20TN25%204

Part of the way along the arches you can see two buttresses sticking out, which I reckon is the support for the former 'gridiron' pier marked on the map.

mossman

  • Guest
Re: Folkstone Harbour.
« Reply #8 on: November 26, 2010, 15:19:16 »
Managed to get a copy of Alan Taylor and Eamon Rodney's book of old Photographs of Folkestone today containing some interesting shots of the harbour showing this railway running along The Stade with the note describing the rails as running the entire length of the harbour to the marine workshops of the South Eastern and Chatham railway.
PS For what it's worth Tesco's are selling a largish selection of "local" old photographic books including E Kent during WW2, some at almost half price ( one being the above of Folkestone ) can see these flying of the shelves ,especially at this time of the year. No I don't work for the company but a good thing is worth having when it's offered like this.

Offline helcion

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 261
  • Appreciation 30
Re: Folkstone Harbour.
« Reply #7 on: November 20, 2010, 21:55:58 »
Mossman    -

Quote
I've no proof but I remember being told of a horse drawn tram way running parallel to the existing railway, travelling from somewhere near the arches by Folkestone East station ( the Junction ) down to the fish harbour, down the appropriately named Tram Road.

I've not heard that tale, [would have been hard work for the horses upgrade !] but have read [somewhere] that the tramway along The Stade on the north side of the harbour was horse-worked & served the fishing fleet.

Looking at DoverDan's map of the harbour the 'fish tramway' [for want of a better title] runs to the viaduct & after a wagon turntable then runs parallel to the mainline on the viaduct.

There doesn't appear to be any rail connection between the fish line & the mainline, so presumably the catch was transferred into mainline fishvans on the viaduct.
Interestingly DD's map shows the viaduct standing on a 'pier' rather than the current arches which go straight into the seabed, so there would have been ample room for such transfer operations.
There would have been a short steep upgrade to bring the tramway up to mainline level.

Or am I reading too much into what I can see of the map ?

The older  [pre-metric] large-scale Admiralty Charts used to give a lot interesting detail of railway tracks & shoreside structures & often these non-navigational details remained unchanged when the charts were updated.
Does anyone have acess to such charts ?     They might help.

The wagon turntables on the goods sidings serving the ferry port would indicate use of horse &/or capstans for shunting.

Cheers

Mike J.



mossman

  • Guest
Re: Folkstone Harbour.
« Reply #6 on: November 20, 2010, 19:40:15 »
I've no proof but I remember being told of a horse drawn tram way running parallel to the existing railway, travelling from somewhere near the arches by Folkestone East station ( the Junction ) down to the fish harbour, down the appropriately named Tram Road.
These remains of a rail system could conceivably tie in with said tramway, again only hearsay though.

DoverDan

  • Guest
Re: Folkstone Harbour.
« Reply #5 on: November 14, 2010, 22:27:27 »
Extract from an 1906 ordnance survey map showing the Harbour and associated railways.

 

Offline howard

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 212
  • Appreciation 7
Re: Folkstone Harbour.
« Reply #4 on: February 08, 2009, 14:20:13 »
An 1881 map shows four tracks north of the swing bridge and the eastern one appears to run down to quay level and teminate in a wagon turntable. This is connected to two quayside lines that serve what I imagine was a full length fish quay on The Stade. There is a rail served jetty at the eastern end of The Stade connected by another wagon turntable and the jetty line also goes north to the bottom of the cliff. So Colin, there was a turntable under or very near the cafe.

Offline Paul

  • Established Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1481
  • Appreciation 61
  • Batpigs'n'Boobies.. ;)
Re: Folkstone Harbour.
« Reply #3 on: February 02, 2009, 23:41:37 »
Ive been looking and cant find any evidence of it connecting to the Railway ???
Theres a tramway and ive seen a pic with a large crane on tracks and horse drawn carts ???
Maybe it's big horse I'm a Londoner. :{

Offline Paul

  • Established Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1481
  • Appreciation 61
  • Batpigs'n'Boobies.. ;)
Re: Folkstone Harbour.
« Reply #2 on: February 02, 2009, 23:06:04 »
Ive heard it referred to as part of the Harbour railway ???
Maybe it's big horse I'm a Londoner. :{

Offline colin haggart

  • Established Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 881
  • Appreciation 21
Folkstone Harbour.
« Reply #1 on: February 02, 2009, 22:40:36 »
Dose anyone know what was running on these tracks? was it a harbour crane?

Was there a turntable under the cafe?





 

BloQcs design by Bloc
SMF 2.0.11 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines