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Author Topic: Snowdown Colliery  (Read 68161 times)

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Offline DS239

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Re: Snowdown Colliery
« Reply #97 on: June 03, 2013, 01:41:16 »
Check this set of photo's out folks! There are some cracking pictures of NCB loco's at both Snowdown and Betteshanger.  :)

http://www.flickr.com/photos/irishswissernie/sets/72157626694269563/

Has anyone any idea what the Class 71 (with its panto up, working off the 750V overhead wires, something not seen that much in photos) is doing in the Snowdown exchange sidings with a rake of tank wagons??

Offline TowerWill

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Re: Snowdown Colliery
« Reply #96 on: February 23, 2013, 19:36:58 »
Thank you for that information DS239 and KentMiner! So it may have been Spitfire that chap had a part share in. I helped out in the little booking office at the 'well' one Easter when the steam loco was being used and had a ride in the coach for the last trip of the day to Eythorne. It would be interesting to see one or more of these locos chuffing around the Snowdown Colliery site if it is still possible. As I've mentioned on other threads, by the time I started working to Tilmanstone (late '70s) there was only one line and a run-round loop left at the Colliery end and, of course, that bridge has gone now.

KentMiner

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Re: Snowdown Colliery
« Reply #95 on: February 23, 2013, 17:24:02 »
Yes it is on the station at Shepherdswell. We have applied for funding to renovate the engine and return steam to the old colliery sites.
We also want to build an engine house for it and a railway workshop with viewing galleries. We are also looking at restoring as much of our mining railway lines, to some of our old colliery sites as we can.
We have much support for this project but we are short of volunteers, any offers would be extremely appreciated.

Offline DS239

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Re: Snowdown Colliery
« Reply #94 on: February 23, 2013, 17:20:21 »
That rather looks like it's standing in the old EKLR platform siding at Shepherdswell.

Yes, that's the EKR platform at Shepherdswell.

Quote
I think it was being used to haul the specials down to Tilmanstone.

No, it has never run in preservation.

The EKR preservationists hired in a Barclay 0-4-0ST named 'Spitfire' for a while to work their trains to Eythorne [they've never reached Tilmanstone because of the missing bridge over Wigmore Lane]


Doncaster Diva: Thanks for posting the pictures, -they're always welcome!  :)


Offline TowerWill

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Re: Snowdown Colliery
« Reply #93 on: February 23, 2013, 16:27:13 »
A nice photo KentMiner! That rather looks like it's standing in the old EKLR platform siding at Shepherdswell. I was a member of that society for a while and I think it was being used to haul the specials down to Tilmanstone. I remember talking to a chap who said he had a part share in a steam loco out at the 'well. That could have been the loco.

KentMiner

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Re: Snowdown Colliery
« Reply #92 on: February 23, 2013, 15:37:55 »
This is the St Dunstan as it is today, waiting to be renovated.
More pictures and info at http://www.facebook.com/#!/groups/eastkentrailway/

Offline TowerWill

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Re: Snowdown Colliery
« Reply #91 on: February 21, 2013, 12:27:37 »
Hello again d.d. That all sounds familiar to me, only I went to Beckenham Junction for training and rules exam. Knew those exceptions by heart and all the ding-ding/loadaphone codes. I think our turn in and out of Snowdown with the empties only involved freight work. Down the line we had a Shepherdswell/Tilmanstone coal train turn that finished off working a boat train from Folkestone East to Folkestone Harbour. So looking like Wesley Pegden ('Last of the Summer Wine') we'd do passenger work too.
Look forward to more photos!

doncaster diva

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Re: Snowdown Colliery
« Reply #90 on: February 21, 2013, 09:40:02 »
Good Morning

Glad you liked the photos. Got some more of the area which I will dig out.

When I was at Faversham (transferred from Sturry Station 1967ish) we had 3 links each of 12 weeks. The passenger link was of course regarded as the creme de la creme. Two goods links A and B. The work in both links was good quality stuff and involved a lot of passenger work. Goods guards learned routes for both passenger and goods trains. For goods of course we needed to know the braking points and were tested on these when we were passed out by the Guard's Inspector who was based at Hither Green Station. You were allowed to read these from the notes you had made when route learning. We were also given a rules exam and I remember that the '13 exceptions to passing signals at danger' were an important part of that. As guards we didn't sign route cards but were expected to have route knowledge for all the routes covered by your home depot.

Happy days.

Regards

John


Offline TowerWill

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Re: Snowdown Colliery
« Reply #89 on: February 21, 2013, 08:26:16 »
Welcome to the Forum Doncaster Diva! Glad to have another ex freight guard on the Forum. When I came to Dover Priory Guard's Depot from carriage cleaning, it was either a fitted head or a fully fitted train too. That accident I mentioned ended unfitted trains on the Southern but I'd still see them North of the Thames. When I was out learning, BR still employed a shunter at Snowdown but he must have left soon after. The guard was then expected to do all the uncoupling and recoupling of the loco as well as work the hand points.
Nice photos too! I remember the steam locos working the yard in the early 1960s but I was still at school then.

doncaster diva

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Re: Snowdown Colliery
« Reply #88 on: February 21, 2013, 00:45:45 »
I was a goods guard based at Faversham in the late 60's early 70's and we worked to and from Snowden Colliery. Mainly with trains for Bowaters Paper Mill at Ridham Dock. Loose coupled goods trains were still very much the order of the day although if I remember correctly they were designated class 7 or 7+ with a fitted head of at least 3 vacuum fitted wagons. It wasn't until I moved to the Eastern Region that I came across class 8 and 9 goods which sometimes needed the wagon brakes to be pinned down before descending steep gradients.

I have attached some pictures of the Snowden colliery locos at work.

Regards

John

Offline DS239

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Re: Snowdown Colliery
« Reply #87 on: December 02, 2012, 03:43:48 »
PS, saw a LSWR  "K" class loco  2-6-0 at Dover, but not in steam, very nice looking engine vacuum and Westinghouse brakes - how it got there ?

Okay, a bit OT from Snowdown Colliery, but that'd be an ex-LB&SCR 'K' class,-from the mid 1950's these were 'shopped' at Ashford Works, and loco's newly ex-works were often run-in on local goods turns, so I would think that would account for it...

Offline TowerWill

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Re: Snowdown Colliery
« Reply #86 on: November 07, 2012, 10:13:42 »
The derailment due to catch points was in 1977 at Mottingham involving two freight trains. There are some descriptions and photos on the internet. I think it was in the following year that the Southern Region ordered that the rear two wagons had to have the automatic brake installed and working(brake vans no longer required at the train's rear). We guards had to check this when making a brake test. Disc braked wagons were harder to check than those with brake blocks. Most of the catch points were also wound shut. Around this time I never worked an unfitted train to Shepherdswell via Snowdown Colliery. Yet cross the River Thames and there were still plenty of unfitted wagons to be seen. A year or two later I  worked a specially authorised unfitted train from Dover Priory sidings to Dover Town Yard being mainly a falling or level gradient.

Offline Bryn Clinch

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Re: Snowdown Colliery
« Reply #85 on: November 06, 2012, 09:51:51 »
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trainman

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Re: Snowdown Colliery
« Reply #84 on: November 06, 2012, 09:20:16 »
 I think the unfitted 4 wheelers came to an end on BR when one truck became derailed in the middle of a train. This one truck turned on its side and skidded along the rail in the middle of the train, a diesel railmotor, coming the in the other direction, smashed into it and killed the driver, so end of 4 wheelers.
I did hear that the Southern was so short of bogie vehicles they had to hire some from France.
trainman

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Re: Snowdown Colliery
« Reply #83 on: November 06, 2012, 05:09:58 »
Hi S4, I should have said "U" or "N"  and or Nelson to Dover. The Nelson to me were lumbering giants and they were not fitted with a steam brake and, believe it or not, it was the fireman who gave the driver the ok to proceed, when the fire was right, after 5 nights of this turn one was aching to get a job on the pilots on Saturday for a rest. 
Drove a truck here in Australia for a while, but gave it up, did not like bashing kangaroos on the roads at night, was only a fill- in job but I suppose it`s all part of life`s rich pattern.
regards, trainman

PS, saw a LSWR  "K" class loco  2-6-0 at Dover, but not in steam, very nice looking engine vacuum and Westinghouse brakes - how it got there ?

 

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