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Author Topic: Chatham Dockyard  (Read 34275 times)

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Offline kyn

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Re: Chatham Dockyard
« Reply #39 on: August 07, 2012, 13:41:16 »
A painting from the late 1700s and a couple of general views.

Offline Lyn L

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Re: Chatham Dockyard
« Reply #38 on: July 14, 2012, 15:00:28 »
Great pics Bilgerat, thanks very much for adding them  :)
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Offline peterchall

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Re: Chatham Dockyard
« Reply #37 on: July 14, 2012, 11:49:07 »
Many thanks for some very interesting views that show much that can't be seen from ground level, such as the details of the roofs. :)
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Offline Bilgerat

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Re: Chatham Dockyard
« Reply #36 on: July 14, 2012, 11:32:10 »
A couple of view of the Historic Dockyard taken from the scaffold tower around No 10 Crane.









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Offline Sentinel S4

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Re: Chatham Dockyard
« Reply #35 on: April 02, 2012, 16:10:01 »
Nice pics LewisE, you have a good 'eye'. You don't realise what a beautiful ship the Gannet is until you see her from this angle. S4.
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Offline swiftone

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Re: Chatham Dockyard
« Reply #34 on: April 02, 2012, 07:04:48 »
Well done LewisE for taking shots at unusual angles to give us a different perspective of some familiar sights.

Offline kyn

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Re: Chatham Dockyard
« Reply #33 on: April 01, 2012, 20:44:12 »
Some general shots taken by LewisE







Offline Leofwine

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Re: Chatham Dockyard
« Reply #32 on: February 20, 2012, 23:26:16 »
Kentish Gazette - Tuesday 26 February 1861

CHATHAM.
The month's notice given to the hired mechanics and labourers at Chatham Dockyard having terminated, the first batch of bands discharged from the establishment left the dockyard on Saturday, when mechanics, most of them excellent workmen, quitted the service of the Admiralty. The same number will leave the dockyard weekly until the 25th May, by which date the whole of the 800 hand to be discharged will have left the establishment. An impression has for some time past prevailed among the shipwrights to be discharged of their being able to procure employment in the French dockyards at Cherbourg and Brest, where they had intended transferring their services after quitting this establishment. Within the last few days, however, private letters have been received from France, in reply to applications from some of the shipwrights at Chatham, intimating that there is no chance whatever of an English shipwright obtaining employment at either of the French naval yards, as, although the utmost activity prevails at establishments, there are comparatively few wooden vessels now under construction, the attention of the French Government being just now almost wholly devoted to the construction of iron-cased vessels.
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Offline mikeb

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Re: Chatham Dockyard
« Reply #31 on: February 15, 2012, 20:10:08 »
Quote
Following my earlier post, it seems that at least one of the Mortar boats was found fit for service.
Either that Leofwine, or their Lordships really didn't mind if the bottom suddenly fell out of a Customs vessel!!
Perhaps the Dolphin was worth keeping!!

Offline Leofwine

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Re: Chatham Dockyard
« Reply #30 on: February 15, 2012, 18:57:06 »
Following my earlier post, it seems that at least one of the Mortar boats was found fit for service.


Kentish Gazette - Tuesday 26 March 1861

CHATHAM.
Instead of the Dolphin, 3-gun brigantine, which was given by the Admiralty for the Coastguard service, instructions have been received at Chatham for No. 4 mortar vessel to be selected from those lying in reserve in the Medway, at Chatham, and handed over to the Custom-house authorities to be converted into a watch-vessel, superseding the old 10-gun brig Harpy, hitherto in use for that purpose.
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Offline cliveh

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Re: Chatham Dockyard
« Reply #29 on: February 15, 2012, 15:18:54 »
It is slightly more complex than that, and more complex than my following explanation, because I'm sticking to the simple version.

Part of it comes down to parish boundaries and municipal boundaries, which are often, but not always the same.  When the Dockyard was moved from Gun Wharf to its present location in the early 1600s, it was built on parts of two Manorial estates, Chatham and Westcourt, the latter one of which straddled the Chatham/Gillingham Parish Boundary. At the start of the 19th century this was further complicated by Brompton Parish being founded, taken out of parts of both parishes, although part remained in Chatham Borough and part in Gillingham as a municipal division. In 1905/6 some of the Brompton area that was in Chatham was taken into Gillingham in exchange for parts of the east end of Chatham High Street that were technically in Gillingham.  As parts of the Dockyard were in Gillingham Parish, parts in Chatham Parish, and parts in Brompton Parish, this makes for the confusion.

Put simply the oldest parts of the Dockyard - Ropery, Main Gate, etc are, and generally always have been, in Chatham, although the police quarters by the main gate are securely in Brompton and hence Gillingham. From the dockyard wall about halfway between the police quarters and the Dock Road roundabout the old parish boundary ran diagonally across the yard until it reached the river somewhere in the vicinity of the mast pond. When Brompton Parish was built the boundary was changed to run along the old dockyard wall down to the river. I think, but am not sure, that the municipal boundary changed with it. When the new extension was to the dockyard was built, along with the convict prison, in the mid 19th century these works were all in Gillingham (technically in Brompton Parish which extended right out to St Mary's Island). As a consequence, the larger part (by area) of the Dockyard is technically in Gillingham.

As I said, this is a slightly simplified version of the development, but serves to give a rough idea.

My 1955 Plan of the Dockyard agrees with what you say Leofwine. In addition it states that it is the Municipal Boundary

cliveh

Offline Leofwine

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Re: Chatham Dockyard
« Reply #28 on: February 14, 2012, 18:50:09 »
Kentish Gazette - Tuesday 02 April 1861

CHATHAM
The Lords of the Admiralty have awarded Mr. E. Stigant, one of the inspectors at Chatham Dockyard, a superannuation allowance of £95 15s. per annum.
By the new regulation just issued from the Admiralty, one-half of the annual sum awarded by their Lordships to apprentices in the Royal dockyards, as scholarships for superior attainments, is to be given to the schoolmaster of the yard, for the care bestowed by him on the apprentices' education. A scholarship of £20 per annum has just been awarded to J. Wildish, shipwright apprentice at Chatham, under the new regulations, £10 of this sum will be annually paid to the master of the dockyard school.
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Offline Leofwine

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Re: Chatham Dockyard
« Reply #27 on: February 14, 2012, 17:36:53 »
It is slightly more complex than that, and more complex than my following explanation, because I'm sticking to the simple version.

Part of it comes down to parish boundaries and municipal boundaries, which are often, but not always the same.  When the Dockyard was moved from Gun Wharf to its present location in the early 1600s, it was built on parts of two Manorial estates, Chatham and Westcourt, the latter one of which straddled the Chatham/Gillingham Parish Boundary. At the start of the 19th century this was further complicated by Brompton Parish being founded, taken out of parts of both parishes, although part remained in Chatham Borough and part in Gillingham as a municipal division. In 1905/6 some of the Brompton area that was in Chatham was taken into Gillingham in exchange for parts of the east end of Chatham High Street that were technically in Gillingham.  As parts of the Dockyard were in Gillingham Parish, parts in Chatham Parish, and parts in Brompton Parish, this makes for the confusion.

Put simply the oldest parts of the Dockyard - Ropery, Main Gate, etc are, and generally always have been, in Chatham, although the police quarters by the main gate are securely in Brompton and hence Gillingham. From the dockyard wall about halfway between the police quarters and the Dock Road roundabout the old parish boundary ran diagonally across the yard until it reached the river somewhere in the vicinity of the mast pond. When Brompton Parish was built the boundary was changed to run along the old dockyard wall down to the river. I think, but am not sure, that the municipal boundary changed with it. When the new extension was to the dockyard was built, along with the convict prison, in the mid 19th century these works were all in Gillingham (technically in Brompton Parish which extended right out to St Mary's Island). As a consequence, the larger part (by area) of the Dockyard is technically in Gillingham.

As I said, this is a slightly simplified version of the development, but serves to give a rough idea.
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SailingTiger

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Re: Chatham Dockyard
« Reply #26 on: February 14, 2012, 16:18:55 »
Now this might put the cat among the pigeons!

I was recently led to believe that the only part of Chatham Dockyard that was in Chatham is the main gate. This had some substance as the boundary marker used to be in the bus stop alongside the main gate.

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Offline Leofwine

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Re: Chatham Dockyard
« Reply #25 on: February 13, 2012, 02:14:49 »
Kentish Gazette - Tuesday 04 June 1861

CHATHAM.
INSPECTION OF DOCKYARD SCHOOLS. — Professor Woolley, L.L.D., the Inspector of the Admiralty Schools, commenced his half-yearly inspection of the school for apprentices at Chatham on Friday.
The whole of the hired mechanics and labourers, numbering nearly 800 men at Chatham Dockyard during the busy period which prevailed some time since, have now been discharged from that establishment, the last of the hired bands having quitted the yard on Saturday week. A few of the hired smiths and labourers have been retained to be employed on tbe Achilles, 40.
SUPERANNUATIONS IN THE DOCKYARD. — The following mechanics in Chatham Dockyard have been superannuated on the pensions named:—W. Bryant, leading man of shipwrights, £57 7s. 8d. per annum; W. Allen, shipwright, £42 5s. 1d.; and J. Taffs, stationed joiner, £45 4s. 2d.
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