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Author Topic: Chatham Dockyard  (Read 34310 times)

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Offline Leofwine

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Re: Chatham Dockyard
« Reply #24 on: February 07, 2012, 01:57:56 »
Kentish Gazette - Tuesday 15 May 1860

CHATHAM.
CHATHAM AND THE MEDWAY.—When Mr. Chisholm Gooden, a few years since, drew the attention of the Government to the desperate prospects of Chatham Dockyard, on which such enormous sums had been expended, tbe only reply vouchsafed was, a notice of the recent improvements as to the extension of the slipways, together with the promise of a letter of thanks from the Lords Commissioners and their then hydrographer but, after the lapse of half a dozen years, even this poor acknowledgment has as yet been actually withheld Mr. Gooden's predictions are being rapidly verified. Owing to the shameful neglect of the embankments, he foretold, eight years ago, that it would soon be impossible to take up a line-of-battle ship to Chatham. On the 9th of last November it was accordingly found impossible for the Cressy (80) to proceed thither, and on more than one other occasion vessels of even lighter draught have been compelled to discharge their guns and heavy stores at Sheerness to enable them to proceed up the Medway.— Hans Busk's Navies of the World.

The survey of two more of the contract mortar vessels, numbered 31 and 48, built for the Admiralty towards the close of the Russian war, has just been completed at Chatham Dockyard, the vessels having been hauled up out of the river on the slip, in order to facilitate the survey. The result of the inspection has shown that both the vessels are as rotten as those first inspected, and utterly unfit for further service; indeed, so rotten were they found to be, that after a portion of the planking had been removed enough was exhibited to satisfy the officers appointed to inspect them that it was unnecessary to extend the survey, and they were accordingly closed up and sent afloat to await an Admiralty order for them to be broken up. It is not yet known whether the Admiralty will have the whole of the gun and mortar vessels lying in Chatham harbour hauled up at the dockyard and inspected, with the view of ascertaining their condition but, as they were all built by contract, there would seem to be no doubt, from those already surveyed, the majority, if not nearly the whole, will be found so rotten as to render them unfit for further service. The two mortar vessels numbered 30 and 32 are being taken to pieces by a numerous body of shipwrights, and the planking having been removed and the timbers laid bare, their fearfully rotten state is at once apparent. Scarcely timber can be discovered which does not contain a liberal quantity "sap." Indeed, portions of the timbers may be picked to pieces with the finger, showing the disgracefully faulty timber which, there can be no doubt, was purposely used in their construction. The workmanship is likewise of a very inferior character, and contrasts strongly with that exhibited in the vessels of war under construction on the adjoining slips, the hired shipwrights who are employed breaking them frequently remarking that the timbers of the vessels seem to have been "thrown" together.
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Offline Leofwine

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Re: Chatham Dockyard
« Reply #23 on: February 07, 2012, 00:33:25 »
Kentish Gazette - Tuesday 14 February 1860

CHATHAM.
ANOTHER ACCIDENT IN THE DOCKYARD.— On Tuesday Thomas Burton, employed on the Severn, 51, in dock, fell down the aperture for the screw into the dock, a depth of about 30 feet, receiving severe injuries on the head. He was conveyed to Melville Hospital, where he lies in a very precarious state.
A MERE SHAM.—The following notice has been issued by order of the Lords of the Admiralty, and is posted at the dockyard gates of Chatham:— "An examination is required of every candidate for promotion. Their lordships will select from the examination lists, on the recommendation of the officers, Those who are considered to be best qualified. The claims of those who appear at the head of the list will be duly considered, but industry, merit, and practical qualifications will also have their weight in guiding the selections. Applications for promotion must not be made by persons serving in the dockyards, except through the superintendent Any attempts to obtain promotion by political, or other direct influence, will be punished for first offence by a reprimand for second offence by reduction to an inferior situation; and for third offence by dismissal from the service; such proceedings having been strictly forbidden by the order in council of 11th of March, 1853." The result of all this is, that the man who is victorious in the examination will be selected if it suits the government — but not otherwise!     
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Offline Leofwine

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Re: Chatham Dockyard
« Reply #22 on: February 06, 2012, 16:59:47 »
Kentish Gazette - Tuesday 28 May 1861

CHATHAM.
SAD ACCIDENT. — Mr. Robert Driver, foreman of the shipwrights, met with a very serious accident in his office in the dockyard on Monday afternoon. It said that he stood upon a stool and opened the window to call to one of the workmen who was passing, and in getting down the stool canted, and he fell with such force against the office table that his right arm was broken. He was immediately attended to by the surgeons of the yard, and afterwards he was removed to his residence at Chatham.
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louisewomble

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Re: Chatham Dockyard
« Reply #21 on: January 22, 2012, 19:58:50 »

Also showing the slaughter hall and cattle lair  ???


Someone explain why they would need these?  Thought it quite strange!!!
[/quote]

As part of the Victualling of ship!

Offline Leofwine

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Re: Chatham Dockyard
« Reply #20 on: July 19, 2010, 16:44:10 »
Is this another entrance to the telephone exchange Kyn? They're bricked up entrances in the wall in Dock Road, near the steps from Admiralty Terrace.


Those were public toilets.  I have a feeling they were still in use when I was a kid, but not 100% sure.
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Offline kyn

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Re: Chatham Dockyard
« Reply #19 on: July 19, 2010, 15:56:05 »

seafordpete

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Re: Chatham Dockyard
« Reply #18 on: November 02, 2009, 17:05:17 »

Offline kyn

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Re: Chatham Dockyard
« Reply #17 on: September 22, 2009, 16:09:01 »
 :)

Offline kyn

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Re: Chatham Dockyard
« Reply #16 on: August 12, 2008, 22:27:35 »

Offline kyn

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Re: Chatham Dockyard
« Reply #15 on: July 06, 2008, 12:31:01 »
Some pics from yesterdays visit



Mast pond





Offline kyn

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Re: Chatham Dockyard
« Reply #14 on: May 31, 2008, 19:24:16 »
The entrance was right about here:
http://www.flashearth.com/?lat=51.393743&lon=0.529163&z=19.3&r=0&src=msl

There was a emergency entrance to the south west too.  Any help would be appreciated Rossco  :)

Offline kyn

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Re: Chatham Dockyard
« Reply #13 on: May 28, 2008, 22:12:46 »
The rumour was that those doors are for public toilets  ???

I would imagine any access would be from a man hole cover, i have been up that part of the dockyard many times and there is no sign of an entrance anywhere.

merc

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Re: Chatham Dockyard
« Reply #12 on: May 28, 2008, 19:52:35 »
Is this another entrance to the telephone exchange Kyn? or is it seperate  ???



I wonder how you get in the telephone exchange now....i'm guessing you have to go through those newer buildings in the Dockyard.

Offline kyn

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Re: Chatham Dockyard
« Reply #11 on: May 28, 2008, 18:35:42 »
Part of a 1953 plan showing the underground telephone exchange entrance, now demolished  :'(



Also showing the slaughter hall and cattle lair  ???



Someone explain why they would need these?  Thought it quite strange!!!

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Re: Chatham Dockyard
« Reply #10 on: May 18, 2008, 13:58:35 »
Here's a great Day by Day of happenings at Chatham Dockyard through the years:
(Bottom of page)

http://campus.medway.ac.uk/library/history.php

Some of it's very interesting,takes a while to get through it though ;D

 

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