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Author Topic: Sheppey Bridges  (Read 41661 times)

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Offline sheppey_bottles

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Re: Sheppey Bridges
« Reply #65 on: January 21, 2016, 14:35:32 »
I will have a look next time I am down that way RWTA.

Offline Riding With The Angels

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Re: Sheppey Bridges
« Reply #64 on: January 18, 2016, 16:48:05 »
Yes Sheppey absolutely. I was just remarking that they appear to be further back in between the old road and the bridge now instead of on the foreshore and have chains between the links. Having said that the chains themselves are very rusty but appear not to be in the images I posted originally. Unless I missed them but I doubt it as they are huge. Might just be my age!

Offline sheppey_bottles

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Re: Sheppey Bridges
« Reply #63 on: January 18, 2016, 09:37:06 »
Did my reply at answer 6 cover this question re the blocks RWA.

Offline Riding With The Angels

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Re: Sheppey Bridges
« Reply #62 on: January 17, 2016, 22:08:41 »
Unfortunately I didn't take any images and only realised when reviewing this thread. The blocks referred to in my post on page 1 of this thread and seen in Kyn's night photos now appear to have been moved back into the recess between the old Ferry Road and the Kings Ferry Bridge. Not visible in my images, although considerably rusty and so have been there some time, are the heavy chains which join the links on all these blocks together now.

KeithJG

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Re: Sheppey Bridges
« Reply #61 on: October 22, 2015, 15:48:30 »
In 1955 when i was about 7yrs my Uncles partner used to take me to Leysdown on the coach from Gillingham Bus Station.

One of her son`s was something to do with Loves Farm and we used to stay in an old bus on the caravan site.

The route was via the Lower Rainham Road, Upchurch and onto the bridge over the Swale.

The thing is we used to call it "Queensferry Bridge"  and Kings Ferry was an old ferry crossing alongside the bridge as in the old OS map of 1865 and it remains that way until 1940.

It then is called "Kings Ferry Bridge".....I do understand that during a King or Queens reign the named took on whoever was on the throne but why now is it not called Queens Ferry when in the 1950`s we knew it as Queens Ferry ?

I have been trying to trace the history of the ferry crossing alongside the bridge but so far only of Army Sappers transporting larger lorries that would not fit the old bridge!

Any one have ideas?

Offline HERB COLLECTOR

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Re: Sheppey Bridges
« Reply #60 on: October 21, 2015, 22:38:46 »
Two photos of the Kingsferry bridges, c 1959.

NA3T.VS01724-01. Shot showing the older Scherzer bridge with the span raised and the newer Mott, Hasy & Anderson bridge still under construction beyond.

NA3T.VS01724-06. Shot showing the towers of the newer Mott, Hay & Annderson bridge still under construction and the older Scherzer bridge with the span lowered beyond.
Train crossing bridge.

There are four more shots of the bridges, all c 1959, on the Archive of Transport, Travel & Trade website @ http://www.na3t.org/road?search=kingsferry
There are also plenty of other Kent related photos.


Offline HERB COLLECTOR

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Re: Sheppey Bridges
« Reply #59 on: April 24, 2014, 23:19:58 »
King's Ferry Bridge - British Pathe

30,000 Marooned by Collision. 1922. 0:38
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GpRC-OovAEY
Population of Sheppey are now really islanders owing to wrecking of King's Ferry Bridge.

After 73 Years. 1929. 1:09
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wmF00p3Ublc
After 73 years Lord Cornwallis declares King's Ferry Bridge open and abolishes the time-old tolls.

Offline davpott

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Re: Sheppey Bridges
« Reply #58 on: December 04, 2013, 19:53:14 »
Is that a ferry landing point on the left hand side. Between the boat's transom and the bridge?

Offline conan

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Re: Sheppey Bridges
« Reply #57 on: December 04, 2013, 15:20:12 »
I posted this photo sometime ago with the caption that it must have been taken in 1963 when the sea froze. A bit of research dates it a bit earlier to 1895 in fact and must show the original bascule bridge built in 1860 that was replaced in 1904 by a Scherzer type bascule bridge.



Other pictures I posted show people being ferried across the Swale. This must have been the result of the Glyn, a Norwegian cargo ship, that crashed into it on December 17th, 1922 bending the structure so severely that it took about 10 months to repair.
To remain ignorant of what happened before you were born is to remain a child......Cicero

Offline Bryn Clinch

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Re: Sheppey Bridges
« Reply #56 on: December 04, 2013, 09:19:50 »
A view of the bridges from the roof of Holy Trinity, Milton Regis. The photo should have been much better but, having totally `lost my head for heights`, I was rooted to the spot. That, coupled with a somewhat arduous climb, which included negotiating a large oak beam that obstructs the entry onto the roof, resulted in a very mediocre result.

Offline HERB COLLECTOR

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Re: Sheppey Bridges
« Reply #55 on: September 15, 2013, 01:12:38 »
At some date before 1817, there were plans to bridge the Swale at Elmley Ferry. "......from Ferry House in Murston to Elmley, with approach roads from Murston Church to south end of bridge, and from Ferry Road in Minster, across the Dray to north end of bridge."
Source. Kent Archives.

Offline grandarog

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Re: Sheppey Bridges
« Reply #54 on: September 12, 2013, 17:36:49 »
Harty Ferry ceased operating at the start of WW2. My wife's Marshall family had had the Ferry Inn with the rights of Oyster fishing through a stretch of the Swale and to run the Ferry from the late 1700's . The last Marshall when it ceased was my wife`s Aunt.

Barry 5X

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Re: Sheppey Bridges
« Reply #53 on: September 12, 2013, 13:41:12 »
Last Sheppey Bridge Ferryman?

Living in Iwade in the 1950's was an elderly Ferryman affectionately known by the village locals and the regulars in the Woolpack Inn as "Uncle Dick".

He became a local celebrity when he appeared on the popular BBC TV programme hosted by Eamonn Andrews called "What's my Line". 

I believed he described himself as an "Uffa".  Not sure if he beat the panel which had to guess his profession - the panel comprised of regulars Gilbert Harding and Lady Isobel Barnett.


Offline HERB COLLECTOR

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Re: Sheppey Bridges
« Reply #52 on: May 07, 2013, 23:19:17 »
From A249, Iwade to Queenborough Realignment Scheme, Kent, archaeological survey. (pdf file) Stage 3 detailed evaluation October 1996. Simon Pratt, Canterbury Archaeological Trust.

Extract.

3.1 Kings Ferry

3.1 Themhethe on Capel Fleet
There has been some confusion regarding the location of "Themhethe" (with variants), an old English name indicating a timber landing place. As this bears upon the history of Kingsferry, it is proper to include an explanatory note. The name appears in documents as early as 1240 and an assize of 1292 refers to a "pons de Thremheth(e) int insulas de Scapeya & Herteya." This bridge was destroyed during a storm or flood and replaced by a ferry. evidence discussed above suggests that Capel Fleet separating Harty from the Minster/Leysdown hills, was between one and one and a half kilometres in width in the twelfth to thirteenth centuries. It is difficult to interpret the assize document in any way other than as referring to a bridge and/or causeway traversing this channel, though it is possible that other thirteenth century occurrences of the name could refer to the Swale crossing from Iwade.

3.1.2 Trinhide on the Swale.
A ferry, which would appear to be that at King's Ferry, is referred to in the accounts of Edward lll in the 1360's. In 1401, Henry lV granted the right to levy a "ferry cess" in order to maintain both ferry and road. The earliest surviving written account of the ferry court, which sat at Kingsborough in 1546, refers to "Trinhide ferry", whilst the next records it as "Trinhide, alias the King's Ferry", the earliest known use of the latter term. The ferry court continued to administer the affairs of "The King's Ferry" up to 1857, after which control of the crossing passed to the Sittingbourne and Sheerness Railway Company. Although the ferry was still employed until the first lift-bridge, erected in 1859-60, was opened to road traffic in 1862.
Published documentary sources would thus seem to support the view that two separate crossings were perhaps at different times referred to with identical or very similar names, probably with the same etymology (which suggests orgins for both in the Saxon period or earlier).

3.2 Ferry House

3.2.1 Medieval Period
In 1367 John Roseacre, who worked on the building of Queenborough castle was contracted to erect a ferryman's house, presumably at Trinhide. It is not certain on which side of the Swale this was built.

3.2.2 Early Post-medieval Period
A plan of Sheppey drawn up around 1572 by "I.M" shows a building marked "Kyngsfery" on the Sheppey bank and a row-boat in the Swale. Another Elizabethan map of Sheppey marks "Kyngsfery" with a small circle, also on the island bank. A ferry court order of 1596 instructed the warden "to make survey of the ferre howse and land belonging to the ferre on thisside" and to "tryme and dress the botes and ferre howse on thisside". As the court sat at Kingsborough, near Minster "thisside" clearly refers to the Sheppey bank. However it is curious that any need was felt to make such a specification and the warden or ferrymen may have maintained another building on the mainland bank, perhaps unofficially and for their own convenience.

3.2.3 Later Post-medieval Period
A two inch to one mile eighteenth century map shows one building at the mainland end of the ferry, on the south east side of the road, and another in a small enclosure on the Sheppey bank on the opposite side of the road. A smaller scale map, the Hundreds of Teyham and Middleton, which shows the same arrangement, is probably based upon the earlier survey. A small stone house is recorded as standing on the mainland side of the crossing, on the site where one George Fox put up a shelter whilst waiting overnight for the ferry. Though rather indistinct, Mudge's 1801 one inch survey of Kent, generally regarded as the first ordnance survey map, appears to show a small building on the north western side of the road on the Sheppey bank of the Swale and nothing on the mainland bank. The somewhat clearer 1819 one inch ordnance survey repeats the information of the 1769 map and adds one or two buildings in another enclosure on the mainland bank, north west of the road and marked as "ho". An 1879 electrotype edition of this map expands this label to "ferry house". In 1843 there was on the Sheppey side of the crossing "a house licenced as a victualling house, in which the ferry-keeper resides". The house upon the opposite side was a victualling house called the "Lord Nelson". In 1847 it was reported that "Kingsferry is crossed by means of a cable 140 fathoms long.......two of the men live on the Iwade side of the water to assist in working the boats". The Lord Nelson was demolished when the current bridge was built. The site of the building shown on the Sheppey bank on the eighteenth and nineteenth century maps appears likely to have been the site of the ferry house in the sixteenth century also and probably lies beneath the current road: its enclosure would not appear to extend as far north as the proposed route.

3.3 Old Ferry Road

3.3.1 Origins
Place name evidence (Iwade, Trinhide and perhaps, Cowsteads) suggests a Saxon or earlier date for the original road onto Sheppey, which may itself have rested on an earlier (prehistoric?) timber trackway. The nuns of Minster abbey (founded c675AD)would almost certainly have required a reasonable route to the mainland and, at least intially (whilst enjoying royal patronage), would have had the means to build or maintain one.

3.3.2 Medieval History
In the 1360's, Edward lll ordered the widening of the existing four foot wide trackway from the ferry to "Cothelles" to thirty foot and had a house built for the ferry's "Janitor". The road would have been embanked and perhaps flanked  by one or two ditches. As noted above Henry lV granted the right to levy ferry tolls, part of which went to maintaining the road, which was repaired or further improved "from Themcodferye to Cothelle's" in 1402 and 1406. The work of 1406 may have been rendered necessary by widespread flooding in 1404.

3.3.3  Line of Road
A counterwall, running parallel to part of Old Ferry Road, on its north western side, probably represents the medieval? inning of Neatscourt Marshes and appears to define the farther side of an old creek. With the likely exception of this embankment, the line of the Saxon or medieval road can hardly be other than that of the Old Ferry Road. This, replaced by the A249 when the current bridge was built c1960, meandered across the marsh from Kingsferry to the Coterells (ie, "Cothelle's") near Straymarsh Cottages. The sinuous line adopted may have followed the side of the early creek or have wound from one slightly higher spot to another in the marshes or mud-flats which it crossed, the creek then forming alongside it.

Offline smiffy

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Re: Sheppey Bridges
« Reply #51 on: February 24, 2013, 18:00:31 »
From what I have read, there was a right granted to levy a toll on all strangers using the ferry by Henry IV in 1401. I would image that this is the origin of the "Kings Ferry" title.

 

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