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Author Topic: Sheppey Bridges  (Read 41745 times)

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Offline Joedest

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Re: Sheppey Bridges
« Reply #50 on: February 24, 2013, 16:17:26 »
To get off the Island many years ago you would have to pay the boatman  to row you across Kings Ferry or Pay a Toll to walk across The Queens Bridge.
 I wonder how it became  known as " Kings Ferry Bridge"





 
From 1909 OS map.

Offline HERB COLLECTOR

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Re: Sheppey Bridges
« Reply #49 on: October 16, 2012, 00:36:16 »
Amateur video of the opening of Kings Ferry Bridge 1960.
www.youtube.com/watch?v=93lf1WFvuuU

Offline smiler

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Re: Sheppey Bridges
« Reply #48 on: October 15, 2012, 13:37:47 »
    1923

Offline CDP

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Re: Sheppey Bridges
« Reply #47 on: October 11, 2012, 13:54:29 »
FERRIES ON THE ISLE OF SHEPPEY.
From “Rambles in the Isle of Sheppy”  by Henry Turmine  1843.

The usual passage of a point against Queenborough is by a ferry called the King’s Ferry for carriages, horses, cattle and passengers. The ferry-boats, two in number, are moved forward by long cables of about 150 fathoms or more, by which, being fastened to each end across the Swale, serve to move it forward by hand. The boats must not on any account be both on the same side. On the opposite side to the Island there was formerly a small house of stone erected by Mr. George Fox. On the Island side there is a house licensed as a victualling house in which the ferry-keeper resides. The house on the opposite side is a victualling house called “The Lord Nelson “.

At the law-day a ferry-warden, two ferry-men and a constable were yearly chosen, who appointed a ferry-keeper and with the homage made rules and orders for the good government of the ferry. At present the court is held every Whit Monday and a ferry-warden is elected annually by a jury consisting of land holders within the Island, who also elect a ferry-keeper if that post be vacant. The ferry-keeper appoints his own ferry-men. By these means, and the rents belonging to it, the ferry has from time to time been maintained as well as the highways through the marshes, together with the sea wall and wharf or ward the ferry keepers house, two large passage boats and a skiff, with cables to tow the boats from side to side. The passage is cost free for all foot travellers and horsemen except on four days yearly, Palm Monday, Whit Monday, St. James` Day and Michaelmas Day, and on Sundays every carriage is taxed a shilling a wheel and if doubled bodied two shillings each wheel and after 8 in the evening 6d extra is charged for every conveyance .

The ferry keeper has the privilege to dredge for oysters exclusive of all others, within the compass of the ferry lock which extends one tows length, that is sixty fathoms each side of the cable.

There are two other ferries of less account to and from this Island. One to the Island of Elmley and the other in that of Harty, but these are only for foot passengers and cattle.

There have been several commissions granted, from time to time, to different persons to view and repair the banks and sea walls of this island, the earliest of which in the 27th year of King Edward 3rd in the 12th year of which the King directed his writs to the Bishop of Rochester and the land holders of the Island that, this island would soon be invaded by the enemies fleets. He therefore commanded them to have ready their men at arms and their archers together with the men of the island for the safety of it against the impending danger
The solution to every problem is a.) time , or  b.) another problem.

Offline Bobdonk

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Re: Sheppey Bridges
« Reply #46 on: October 10, 2012, 13:44:18 »
From the same book  page 250 1868 edition

http://books.google.co.uk/books/about/Handbook_for_travellers_in_Kent_and_Suss.html?id=9JNAAAAAYAAJ&redir_esc=y

If the tourist is minded to visit the Isle of Grain he can best accomplish it by boat from Sheerness from which it is distant about 1-1/2 m but the passage is not always to be accomplished without some difficulty owing to the strength of the current and the charge varies from Is 6d to 10s according to the state of the weather.

Bob

Offline Bobdonk

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Re: Sheppey Bridges
« Reply #45 on: October 10, 2012, 12:19:59 »
Extract from A handbook for travellers [sic] in Kent and Sussex
Published 1858 by J. Murray in London .

Page 56

ROUTE 3.
THE ISLE OF SHEPPEY.
The Isle of Sheppey may best be visited from Chatham, landing at Sheerness. There is a ferry across the Swale, connecting a road from Sittingbourne to Sheerness, along which line a railway is now in progress; but the tourist will do best to avail himself of the Medway Company's steamboats, which leave the pier adjoining the Strood railway station four times daily during the summer, touching in their way at the Sun Pier, Chatham. The passage between Strood and Sheerness is made in about 1-1/2 hour.

The railroad now in progress from Sheerness to Sittingbourne will open a new line of access to the N. side of the county, from the opposite coast of Essex, at Southend

http://ia600400.us.archive.org/18/items/handbookfortrave00john/handbookfortrave00john.pdf

Minsterboy

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Re: Sheppey Bridges
« Reply #44 on: October 10, 2012, 06:26:00 »
There was a ferry at Harty, which was little more than a large rowing boat, but I'm not aware of it running during my lifetime of 65 years. There was a plan during the 1970/80's by the landlord of the Ferry House Inn to re-instate the ferry using an old army DUKW but it never got off the ground, or should I say, into the water.

Elmley Ferry, which ran between Elmley and Murston and included a Ferryman's House on the Murston side, ceased to operate in about 1950 and at the time of its closure was using a motor launch. The last ferryman was Jack Wade. Nobody occupied the Ferry House after the 1953 floods. This from The Story of Murston by Bryan Clark.

From the Sittingbourne, Milton and District Directory of 1908/09, reprinted by WJ Parrett Ltd. in 1980, it possible to glean the following.
Elmley Ferry is a private ferry owned by the University of Oxford. The ferry is open from 06.00am - 10.00pm from April 1st to Sept 30th and from 06.00am - 08.00pm from Oct. 1st to April 30th? On Sunday the ferry is open from 06.00 - 8.00pm though it is closed between 2.30pm-04.30pm. The fare is threepence single or return on week-days and fourpence single or return on Sundays. There is a cattle boat, and horses, carts and various kinds of stock are conveyed at special charges and at convenient times. Ferryman is William Henry Hallums.

Offline peterchall

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Re: Sheppey Bridges
« Reply #43 on: October 09, 2012, 22:34:06 »
Thanks everybody for the info on the Ferries. I believe the Harty Ferry was still operating until not too many years ago - is that right?
Re Kingsferry, I suppose that was obvious :)
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Offline kyn

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Re: Sheppey Bridges
« Reply #42 on: October 09, 2012, 19:35:45 »
There was a commercial ferry at Kings Ferry and a passenger ferry at Harty/Oare.  Depending on how far back you are going I think a ferry service also ran from Elmley.

Offline davpott

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Re: Sheppey Bridges
« Reply #41 on: October 09, 2012, 14:37:12 »
Kingsferry was by the bridge.

Also at Elmley and Harty.

Offline Bobdonk

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Re: Sheppey Bridges
« Reply #40 on: October 09, 2012, 14:26:08 »
If you look at my posting re John Wesley, there is a mention of a ferry from the Isle of Grain to Sheerness.

http://www.kenthistoryforum.co.uk/index.php?topic=14626.msg119514#msg119514

Also I believe there were, at times, ferries from London.

Bob


Offline Paul

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Re: Sheppey Bridges
« Reply #39 on: October 09, 2012, 13:29:06 »
Kingsferry was by the bridge.
Maybe it's big horse I'm a Londoner. :{

Offline peterchall

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Re: Sheppey Bridges
« Reply #38 on: October 09, 2012, 12:45:55 »
It's more than a small bit of info - many thanks :)
Presumably from the 13th century until 1860 the only access was by ferry; is there any info regarding where that was?
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Offline kyn

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Re: Sheppey Bridges
« Reply #37 on: October 09, 2012, 08:52:04 »
There is a small bit of info here: http://www.sheppeywebsite.co.uk/index.php?id=77

Offline peterchall

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Re: Sheppey Bridges
« Reply #36 on: October 08, 2012, 23:16:00 »
http://www.kenthistoryforum.co.uk/index.php?topic=2692.msg33282#msg33282
That bridge seems to pre-date the bridge that the present lifting bridge replaced. Does anyone know when this was?
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