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Author Topic: Sheppey Bridges  (Read 48655 times)

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Offline Bobdonk

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Re: Sheppey Bridges
« Reply #33 on: October 10, 2012, 12:19:59 »
Extract from A handbook for travellers [sic] in Kent and Sussex
Published 1858 by J. Murray in London .

Page 56

ROUTE 3.
THE ISLE OF SHEPPEY.
The Isle of Sheppey may best be visited from Chatham, landing at Sheerness. There is a ferry across the Swale, connecting a road from Sittingbourne to Sheerness, along which line a railway is now in progress; but the tourist will do best to avail himself of the Medway Company's steamboats, which leave the pier adjoining the Strood railway station four times daily during the summer, touching in their way at the Sun Pier, Chatham. The passage between Strood and Sheerness is made in about 1-1/2 hour.

The railroad now in progress from Sheerness to Sittingbourne will open a new line of access to the N. side of the county, from the opposite coast of Essex, at Southend

http://ia600400.us.archive.org/18/items/handbookfortrave00john/handbookfortrave00john.pdf

Minsterboy

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Re: Sheppey Bridges
« Reply #32 on: October 10, 2012, 06:26:00 »
There was a ferry at Harty, which was little more than a large rowing boat, but I'm not aware of it running during my lifetime of 65 years. There was a plan during the 1970/80's by the landlord of the Ferry House Inn to re-instate the ferry using an old army DUKW but it never got off the ground, or should I say, into the water.

Elmley Ferry, which ran between Elmley and Murston and included a Ferryman's House on the Murston side, ceased to operate in about 1950 and at the time of its closure was using a motor launch. The last ferryman was Jack Wade. Nobody occupied the Ferry House after the 1953 floods. This from The Story of Murston by Bryan Clark.

From the Sittingbourne, Milton and District Directory of 1908/09, reprinted by WJ Parrett Ltd. in 1980, it possible to glean the following.
Elmley Ferry is a private ferry owned by the University of Oxford. The ferry is open from 06.00am - 10.00pm from April 1st to Sept 30th and from 06.00am - 08.00pm from Oct. 1st to April 30th? On Sunday the ferry is open from 06.00 - 8.00pm though it is closed between 2.30pm-04.30pm. The fare is threepence single or return on week-days and fourpence single or return on Sundays. There is a cattle boat, and horses, carts and various kinds of stock are conveyed at special charges and at convenient times. Ferryman is William Henry Hallums.

Offline peterchall

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Re: Sheppey Bridges
« Reply #31 on: October 09, 2012, 22:34:06 »
Thanks everybody for the info on the Ferries. I believe the Harty Ferry was still operating until not too many years ago - is that right?
Re Kingsferry, I suppose that was obvious :)
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Offline kyn

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Re: Sheppey Bridges
« Reply #30 on: October 09, 2012, 19:35:45 »
There was a commercial ferry at Kings Ferry and a passenger ferry at Harty/Oare.  Depending on how far back you are going I think a ferry service also ran from Elmley.

Offline davpott

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Re: Sheppey Bridges
« Reply #29 on: October 09, 2012, 14:37:12 »
Kingsferry was by the bridge.

Also at Elmley and Harty.

Offline Bobdonk

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Re: Sheppey Bridges
« Reply #28 on: October 09, 2012, 14:26:08 »
If you look at my posting re John Wesley, there is a mention of a ferry from the Isle of Grain to Sheerness.

http://www.kenthistoryforum.co.uk/index.php?topic=14626.msg119514#msg119514

Also I believe there were, at times, ferries from London.

Bob


Offline Paul

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Re: Sheppey Bridges
« Reply #27 on: October 09, 2012, 13:29:06 »
Kingsferry was by the bridge.
Maybe it's big horse I'm a Londoner. :{

Offline peterchall

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Re: Sheppey Bridges
« Reply #26 on: October 09, 2012, 12:45:55 »
It's more than a small bit of info - many thanks :)
Presumably from the 13th century until 1860 the only access was by ferry; is there any info regarding where that was?
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Offline kyn

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Re: Sheppey Bridges
« Reply #25 on: October 09, 2012, 08:52:04 »
There is a small bit of info here: http://www.sheppeywebsite.co.uk/index.php?id=77

Offline peterchall

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Re: Sheppey Bridges
« Reply #24 on: October 08, 2012, 23:16:00 »
http://www.kenthistoryforum.co.uk/index.php?topic=2692.msg33282#msg33282
That bridge seems to pre-date the bridge that the present lifting bridge replaced. Does anyone know when this was?
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Offline Paul

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Maybe it's big horse I'm a Londoner. :{

Offline Sylvaticus

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Re: Sheppey Bridges
« Reply #22 on: March 14, 2012, 01:39:17 »
Re Conan's no. 1 - you can see how narrow it was, single line traffic only, with traffic lights at each end.

And re the photo on Smiler's cutting, you can see the single file of traffic coming off the bridge, while traffic leaving the island is waiting at their red light.
Also on Smiler's photo, a road under the railway approach to the old bridge, that led across the field to a farmhouse roughly halfway to Rushenden. That road under the railway used to be the only way to pass the bridge (at high tide at least) and continue to Elmley along the sea wall. Once the new (i.e. 1960s) bridge was finished, the new road and rail bank cut that farm track off, and there was no way through to Elmley along the seawall from Rushenden except at low tide. I don't know what it's like now with yet another bridge, maybe even the low tide route is no longer passable.

Offline conan

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Re: Sheppey Bridges
« Reply #21 on: January 16, 2012, 14:03:54 »
A few more of the bridge from dads archive

1 you can just make out the plank decking in this photo


2


3


4 This must have been taken in the winter of 63 when the sea froze

To remain ignorant of what happened before you were born is to remain a child......Cicero

lesanne

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Re: Sheppey Bridges
« Reply #20 on: January 16, 2012, 13:36:47 »
It was wooden. The sound of the "floorboards" when we went over it, frightened me as a child.

Chezzz

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Re: Sheppey Bridges
« Reply #19 on: November 17, 2011, 15:24:01 »
Downloaded this footage a while ago courtesy of British Pathe:

http://s151.photobucket.com/albums/s150/buffher/videos/?action=view&current=794_22.mp4



 

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