News: “Over the graves of the Druids and under the wreck of Rome,
Rudely but surely they bedded the plinth of the days to come.
Behind the feet of the Legions and before the Norseman’s ire
Rudely but greatly begat they the framing of State and Shire
Rudely but deeply they laboured, and their labour stand till now.
If we trace on ancient headlands the twist of their eight-ox plough.”

-Rudyard Kipling
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Author Topic: Dockyard Churches, Sheerness  (Read 34002 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

busyglen

  • Guest
Re: Dockyard Churches, Sheerness
« Reply #41 on: December 08, 2014, 18:43:08 »
I feel so sad every time I see these pictures.  When I was young, this was our church, and my three brothers used to be in the choir.  My sister also got married there, one Boxing Day, and it was lovely.

Offline cliveh

  • Established Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1236
  • Appreciation 154
    • Kent's Historical Sites
Re: Dockyard Churches, Sheerness
« Reply #40 on: December 08, 2014, 10:16:53 »
The Church as it currently looks:

cliveh

Offline conan

  • Established Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1104
  • Appreciation 78
Re: Dockyard Churches, Sheerness
« Reply #39 on: October 18, 2014, 20:22:42 »
Seeing the 2 posts today regarding the dockyard church at Sheerness sent me searching through the forum. I thought I'd put these photos up before but I can;t find them (maybe disappeared into cyberspace )so here's a repeat.



To remain ignorant of what happened before you were born is to remain a child......Cicero

John38

  • Guest
Re: Dockyard Churches, Sheerness
« Reply #38 on: February 26, 2014, 20:48:50 »
My wife was taken to the Sheerness Dockyard Church each Sunday, by her grandmother. She was Cornish (from the Lizard) and went to the church because it was High Church, which suited her position as the widow of a "Capn's Writer."

Offline Bryn Clinch

  • Established Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 950
  • Appreciation 74
Re: Dockyard Churches, Sheerness
« Reply #37 on: February 26, 2014, 19:45:02 »
filmer01! PM sent.

Offline filmer01

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 214
  • Appreciation 11
Re: Dockyard Churches, Sheerness
« Reply #36 on: February 26, 2014, 15:05:31 »
http://www.sheppeywebsite.co.uk/index.php?id=115

"In 1884 the nearby Dockyard Church was ravaged by fire, it was later refurbished - however this church was closed in 1970 nd when this happened the altar and some wooden panelling were moved to Holy Trinity Church, which you can still see today."

I'm not sure what else they were given or if anything was sent to other churches.
I believe that the organ (undated) built by Hill, Norman & Beard, was removed from the church prior to 1970 and installed in the Maidstone Prison Chapel where it has been rebuilt and enlarged. As far as I am aware it is still there.


As a young chorister at St Mary's Newington I witnessed the rebuilding of their organ in the early 1960s. I believe that it was shortly after that (1963/4?) that the same firm (from Taunton a vague memory says) removed the organ from the Dockyard church. Some of the choristers from Newington "helped" by walking to and fro with pipes (there are an awful lot of pipes....) to the waiting truck. I also remember a reference to Maidstone Prison being the intended destination once rebuilt.

I remember the church as it had a balcony which was quite a different feature to the traditional village churches that we were used to singing in. The atmosphere was one of disuse rather than abandonment or neglect, but imposing none the less.

I found both experiences with these instruments fascinating and then used to help tune that at Newington. Later, in 1968, I again helped dismantle an organ, this time from Hollingbourne church, and it was taken to Herne Bay, where I helped reassemble and update it (tracker action converted to electro-mechanical) until I headed off to University.
Illegitimus nil carborundum

Offline HERB COLLECTOR

  • Established Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1520
  • Appreciation 236
Re: Dockyard Churches, Sheerness
« Reply #35 on: July 08, 2013, 21:41:03 »
Gumnet wrote:

Thank you for the story on the Dockyard Sheerness Church. Is there any record of burials at this Dockyard churchyard or burials at Trinity Church Sheerness?  I am looking for a burial place for my GG Grandfather Thomas Briggs, died aged 24yrs, 122 Charles Street, Blue Town on 09 Aug 1854.
Kind regard.


There is an online listing of the burial records for Half Way Cemetery,  try the Penney website.  You could enquire of the local newspaper of the week of his death.  Very often detailed obituaries were printed outlining a persons life and even who attended and sent wreaths to a funeral!

Alas, the Halfway Cemetery opened in 1857.
Local (Sheppey) newspapers only began printing in 1858 (Sheerness Guardian) and 1868 (Sheerness Times).

Offline CDP

  • Established Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 834
  • Appreciation 86
    • SHEERNESS/SHEPPEY/PENNEY
Re: Dockyard Churches, Sheerness
« Reply #34 on: June 26, 2013, 19:30:40 »
Yes my web page has all the Sheerness Dockyard bdm's and the ADM number.
The solution to every problem is a.) time , or  b.) another problem.

annieoburns

  • Guest
Re: Dockyard Churches, Sheerness
« Reply #33 on: June 26, 2013, 17:15:24 »
Gumnet wrote:

Thank you for the story on the Dockyard Sheerness Church. Is there any record of burials at this Dockyard churchyard or burials at Trinity Church Sheerness?  I am looking for a burial place for my GG Grandfather Thomas Briggs, died aged 24yrs, 122 Charles Street, Blue Town on 09 Aug 1854.
Kind regard.


There is an online listing of the burial records for Half Way Cemetery,  try the Penney website.  You could enquire of the local newspaper of the week of his death.  Very often detailed obituaries were printed outlining a persons life and even who attended and sent wreaths to a funeral!

Offline CDP

  • Established Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 834
  • Appreciation 86
    • SHEERNESS/SHEPPEY/PENNEY
Re: Dockyard Churches, Sheerness
« Reply #32 on: September 03, 2012, 14:37:28 »
 Hello Gumnet. Have you checked my web site, it may help??
The solution to every problem is a.) time , or  b.) another problem.

Offline CDP

  • Established Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 834
  • Appreciation 86
    • SHEERNESS/SHEPPEY/PENNEY
Re: Dockyard Churches, Sheerness
« Reply #31 on: September 03, 2012, 12:47:26 »
Another little tit-bit from our local newspaper of years ago .

1881 November 26th. (Reported again in 1918 February 23rd.)
The H.M.Dockyard church caught fire. Mr.H.Chandler a Metropolitan Policeman was on duty. A gale was raging at the time. An hour or two before the outbreak of the fire the streets were almost deserted. A vessel was ashore on the Red Sands with men clinging to the rigging. The fire was possibly started by the heating apparatus, some sparks were blown under the slates and ignited the material there about 8.30 or 9pm. The Dockyard Chapel as it was called was on fire. The parapet crashed down at 11pm burying four men, one a Pembroke Marsnew was crushed to death. The church was built by Nicholson in 1824 but did not open until 1829. Prior to this the church was situated on the left hand side of the new road, a thoroughfare from the High Street of Bluetown from opposite where the Red Lion stands to Sheerness Garrison. This was before the massive brick wall which cost £50.000 was built to enclose the Dockyard from Rats Bay to Naval Terrace and from the Church to the Gun Wharf. The present church is either the fouth or fifth which has been built in connection with the Dockyard. One church was over the Dockyard gates. There was also a Church Ship berthed near the Cornwallis Jetty approached by a long gangway. In the church today is an altar of one of the former Dockyard Churches dated 1744.
The solution to every problem is a.) time , or  b.) another problem.

Gumnut

  • Guest
Re: Dockyard Churches, Sheerness
« Reply #30 on: September 02, 2012, 06:49:25 »
Thank you for the story on the Dockyard Sheerness Church. Is there any record of burials at this Dockyard churchyard or burials at Trinity Church Sheerness?  I am looking for a burial place for my GG Grandfather Thomas Briggs, died aged 24yrs, 122 Charles Street, Blue Town on 09 Aug 1854.
Kind regard.

busyglen

  • Guest
Re: Dockyard Churches, Sheerness
« Reply #29 on: November 27, 2011, 17:36:10 »
Thanks from me also, although sad, it's interesting reading.

Offline kyn

  • Administrator
  • Established Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7430
  • Appreciation 425
    • Sheppey History
Re: Dockyard Churches, Sheerness
« Reply #28 on: November 27, 2011, 11:22:28 »
Thank you for adding these, this is the first time I have seen the names of those killed!

Offline HERB COLLECTOR

  • Established Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1520
  • Appreciation 236
Re: Dockyard Churches, Sheerness
« Reply #27 on: November 27, 2011, 00:24:24 »
Fire at Dockyard Chapel, Novenber 1881, continued.
On Sunday morning, at an early hour, people might have been seen wending their way to Blue Town to inspect the ruins of the chapel. When viewed from a distance, there was little in the appearance of the building to betoken the terrible scenes that had been witnessed only a few hours previously. True, the flagstaff, crowned with the vane, was hanging over the north side of the tower, but otherwise there was not much to attact the notice of the casual observer. The interior of the building, however, presented a woeful appearance.
The charred remains of some of the beams of the gallery were still standing, and the floor was covered with the debris of the roof and the ashes of the pews. Several of the latter on the south side of the chapel escaped almost uninjured, but on the north side where the fire, in consequence of the highwind, raged the fiercest, nearly everthing was destroyed. The fury with which the fire raged in the tower is indicated by the bareness of the walls. The remnants of the clock were found lying near the front entrance. It was at one time feared that the tower would succumb to the elements that were combining against it within and without, but being supported upon iron pillars, it stood firm. Had such a calamity occurred the results would have been terrible, for many of the spectators most imprudently crowded very near the buring edifice.
The organ, a fine instument by Bevington, is totally destroyed, and not a vestige of it has been found among the ruins. There were three memorial stones upon the walls of the building, and the one on the south side, which was to the memory of Miss Hobbs, daughter of R,G. Hobbs, Esq, formerly cashier at this dockyard, is preserved intact. The stone erected to the memory of those who lost their lives in the explosion on board H.M.S. Thistle is slightly defaced, but can easily be repaired, and the same remarks apply to the memorial stone of some men belonging to H.M.S. Barracouta, who were killed at the Samoan Islands. The pulpit is not much injured, but the rerodos, although the commandments, &e, are still readable, is considerably defaced. Some thousands of persons visted the spot during Sunday, although a general inspection of the interior was not permitted, and the ruins have been an object of attraction since. The hoses had to be played upon the debris several times on Sunday, and on Monday night the fire broke out afresh, but it was quickly subdued by the police in attendance. The building has been watched every night during the week.
With respect to the origin of the fire, there can be no doubt that it broke out in the roof. Several reasons have been advanced as to the cause, but the theory that find acceptance with proessional men at Sheerness dockyard is that a spark from the flue of the heating appartus must have found a lodgement under one of the slates, and then, fanned by the heavy wind, set fire to the boarding beneath. The fact of the interior of the chapel being in total darkness when the alarm was first given, and even when an entrance was effected, certainly favours this supposition. The stoke hole is situate outside the western end of the building, almost directly under the spot where the conflagration appeared to have originated. The flue, which is constructed upon most approved principles, passes between the walls in a straight line. The fire is lighted by a dockyard labourer during the afternoon. and is attended to by the police man on the beat nearest the chapel.
On Saturday evening there was no departure from the usual routine, it is very probale that the gale caused an increased draught in the flue, and forced the sparks, which had been seen upon two or three occasions during the evening, out of the chimney.
On Tuesday, Mr Bernays, superintending civil engineer of works in this district, visted the chapel and inspected it for the purpose of making a report to the Admiralty.
A rumour is current that the edifice is not to be re-built, there not being the same necessity for it as when it was erected, but of course any statement in this direction must be mere conjecture. The contract for the building of the church, at a cost of £10,000, was entered into with Messrs Banks, Joliffe, and Nicholson in 1824, but it was not until 1829 that the chapel was opened for public worship.
It was a somewhat singular circumstance that the farewell sermon of the Rev, E.A. Williams, whose term has expired, and who is to be succeeded by the Rev. Edward Pemberton, was to have preached on Sunday evening last.
The police-constables, Rosier and Chandler, who are seriously injured, were conveyed to Melville Hospital, Chatham, on Sunday morning, and upon enquiring at noon yasterday (Friday) at the maingate we learn that they are progressing favourably towards recovery. James McCarthy, a seaman, of the Royal Naval Barracks, who received injuries to his head and wrist, has been able to resume his ordinary duties.
Mr Haslett, Clerk of Works, at this yard, has been engaged during the week in superintending the removal of the charred timbers.

 

BloQcs design by Bloc
SMF 2.0.11 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines