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Author Topic: Medway Moving on from Dockyard Closure  (Read 3795 times)

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Merv

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Re: Medway Moving on from Dockyard Closure
« Reply #4 on: February 01, 2010, 00:06:11 »
"Also with that I respond to MedKev's remark about the next generation.A walk down Gillingham High St on any Saturday will bring you face to face with this second generation,and they arent very nice people.Difference is, is that this lot have chosen to live this lifestyle."

Living in Lower Gillingham and being associated with the area for years I have a view.
Lower Gillingham was a place of pride back then, people looked after there places and the Gillingham Council did a pretty good job of looking after the place.
My Mother said when I told her I was moving here in the seventies that "it was Posh and I wouldn't like it" :)
It was compared to where I was.
I agree there is a lost generation and  Job Vacancy figures of people working are not often filled by long term people, but recent cheap labour influxes from overseas or those living in new builds on the outskirts who came because it is cheaper to buy here than London.
The old parts of Medway remain in decline and regeneration means little, how many times as Chatham been redeveloped since the Pentagon was built.
That was supposed to be a shangrila.

Bard Farsh

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Re: Medway Moving on from Dockyard Closure
« Reply #3 on: April 30, 2009, 20:41:03 »
In the strictest possible terms of moving on I would agree that the Medway Towns have moved on. In 1985 the unemployment figure for the towns was in the region of an incredible 17% and at one point peaked at 18.1%! In recent years it has been down to about 2 or 3%. The towns today have a more widely spread and varied employment base that doesn't depend on just a few very big employers as was the case in the 1980's when the departure of Metal Box, Wingets and BP so soon after the Dockyard closure, collectively destroyed a great but narrowly focused engineering tradition.

What I think has been the true cost has been the pride and self-belief of the Medway Towns. The Dockyard closure ripped the heart out of the towns and I believe the towns are still suffering that loss today. The functioning Dockyard was the beating heart of the towns around which everything else revolved and its closure left a huge vacuum that I feel has not been fully filled.

On the up-side we have a burgeoning tourism industry, a fast-growing University centre, and surprisingly one of the strongest and most active centres of regeneration activity in the Thames Gateway, so not all doom and gloom.

I loved the Dockyard. I grew-up with it as part of my life. It provide part of my living. I was devastated when it closed. BUT 25 years on we ourselves must move on - accept what happened. We should always remember the great times, always honour the history, but move on.


Brompton,
Your second paragraph sums up how I feel about it as well.My old man was one of those to lose his job and a lot of his work mates just gave up.Took my dad two years to find another job and that was in Erith.Which explains why Lower Gillingham suffered as there was no one to spend money in the local cafes,pubs at lunchtime and after work etc.I dont agree with the 3% unemployment rate though,when you add on all those on incapacity benefit,and there are thousands plus the NEETS I would say it is more like 15%.Also with that I respond to MedKev's remark about the next generation.A walk down Gillingham High St on any Saturday will bring you face to face with this second generation,and they arent very nice people.Difference is, is that this lot have chosen to live this lifestyle.

Offline bromptonboy

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Re: Medway Moving on from Dockyard Closure
« Reply #2 on: March 28, 2009, 08:15:33 »
In the strictest possible terms of moving on I would agree that the Medway Towns have moved on. In 1985 the unemployment figure for the towns was in the region of an incredible 17% and at one point peaked at 18.1%! In recent years it has been down to about 2 or 3%. The towns today have a more widely spread and varied employment base that doesn't depend on just a few very big employers as was the case in the 1980's when the departure of Metal Box, Wingets and BP so soon after the Dockyard closure, collectively destroyed a great but narrowly focused engineering tradition.

What I think has been the true cost has beenthe pride and self-belief of the Medway Towns. The Dockyard closure ripped the heart out of the towns and I believe the towns are still suffering that loss today. The functioning Dockyard was the beating heart of the towns around which everything else revolved and its closure left a huge vacuum that I feel has not been fully filled.

On the up-side we have a burgeoning tourism industry, a fast-growing University centre, and surprisingly one of the strongest and most active centres of regeneration activity in the Thames Gateway, so not all doom and gloom.

I loved the Dockyard. I grew-up with it as part of my life. It provide part of my living. I was devastated when it closed. BUT 25 years on we ourselves must move on - accept what happened. We should always remember the great times, always honour the history, but move on.


Offline MedKev86

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Medway Moving on from Dockyard Closure
« Reply #1 on: March 27, 2009, 18:26:40 »
Well according to this article Medway has moved on from the closure of the dockyard.

http://www.medwaymessenger.co.uk/kol08/article/default.asp?article_id=59681

I disagree to a certain extend. Hundreds forced into the benefits culture due to lack of jobs requiring their skills and now the second generation following suit, very prominant in my opinion, I see it day in day out at work.

Discuss.  OO

 

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