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Author Topic: Wingham pumping station..  (Read 7220 times)

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Offline Bilgerat

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Re: Wingham pumping station..
« Reply #11 on: June 08, 2013, 19:11:07 »
The only place where there are victorian sewage pumping engines open to the public is Crossness Sewage Treatment Works near Abbey Wood.
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Offline Joedest

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Re: Wingham pumping station..
« Reply #10 on: April 22, 2013, 14:37:14 »

Very interesting. Are there any steam pumping stations in Kent still available to view working?
 I remember one at Highsted near Sittingbourne.

Offline Sentinel S4

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Re: Wingham pumping station..
« Reply #9 on: December 07, 2012, 19:32:58 »
Looks and sounds very much like a marine engine. Did it ever come out of a ship?
Alastair

Generally they were similar to marine engines but without reversing gear. They were set to run in one direction as efficiently as possible. When starting you would use the 'simpling valve', this would admit high pressure steam to all cylinders, then go over to expansive working. These engines only had one eccentric per cylinder, that made them a little cheaper to buy, but they still had the air-pumps for the condensers, again promoting efficient running.

Great pics though and thanks for posting them.

S4.

I forgot to add that very few were modified marine engines. What was the point? A retired marine engine had worked thousands of hours and by the time the ship was scrapped it was worn out. Sometimes the very reason for scrapping was that the engines were clapped out. The steam engine builders of the UK produced thousands of similar engines like this, you told them what the work required was and generally they had the drawings of the engine you needed to hand. These engines were not rare, similar machinery was installed in countless water and sewerage pumping stations AND electricity generating stations nation wide.
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Offline Margate History

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Re: Wingham pumping station..
« Reply #8 on: December 07, 2012, 18:39:57 »
Early picture of the Pumping Station

Monkton Malc

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Re: Wingham pumping station..
« Reply #7 on: November 14, 2010, 19:44:10 »
Thank you for posting those pictures Ted. Now others can see what I was lucky enough to when I was at school.  :)


MM

Offline Ted Ingham

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Re: Wingham pumping station..
« Reply #6 on: November 14, 2010, 15:22:40 »
Some more pictures












Regards,
Ted

Offline Alastair

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Re: Wingham pumping station..
« Reply #5 on: October 18, 2010, 16:37:47 »
Looks and sounds very much like a marine engine. Did it ever come out of a ship?
Alastair

Offline unfairytale

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Re: Wingham pumping station..
« Reply #4 on: October 17, 2010, 22:31:42 »
The pump house was opened to the public for it's final running on steam from October the 9th to the 20th 1967.

 The engine you saw was the second one to be housed in the building. I know nothing about that one but the second one was built by Haythorn Davey and Co. LTD in 1915; because of the war it was not installed until 1919.
 It was a 267 horse power triple expansion vertical engine and ran off two 160psi Babcock and Wilcox boilers which were built in 1903 originally to provide steam for the first engine; a third boiler was added in 1927.

 The engine could lift three and a half million gallons of water per day, rotating at 25rpm. The crankshaft and flywheel weighed 17 tons, and the flywheel itself had a diameter of 18ft. The three cylinders were 20, 36 and 52 inches in diameter and each had a stroke of four feet.







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Monkton Malc

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Re: Wingham pumping station..
« Reply #3 on: October 12, 2010, 18:30:30 »
Thank you Ted, I look forward to seeing those  :)

Offline Ted Ingham

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Re: Wingham pumping station..
« Reply #2 on: October 12, 2010, 16:37:11 »
Hello Malcolm,
I have a set of pictures of the Pumping Station. My father was a teacher at Herne Bay Secondary School and took a group of pupils around about the same time as your visit.
However they are stored away at the moment up in the loft.
I will, when located, scan them and put them on this site.
Regards,
Ted

Monkton Malc

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Wingham pumping station..
« Reply #1 on: April 09, 2009, 22:19:17 »
Hi everyone,

I don't seem to be able to find anything out about Wingham pumping station.

I was trying to find pictures of it when it was steam powered. I was one of the lucky people who went there on it's last day of steam back in the year dot (or was it 1968?).
We had a treat at primary school and the top 4 boys went to the pumping station and the top 4 girls did something else (well I didn't have any interest in girls in those days).

I remember going down some steps underground on walkways with pipes and the shaft from the beam engine (I think)  and also looking into the boiler room, but as cameras were not as advanced in those days as they are now (plus my parents wouldn't have let me take one with me) I sadly do not have any pictures of my last primary school trip  :(


Malcolm.

 

 

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