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Author Topic: Medway Trams  (Read 51570 times)

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Offline Leofwine

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Re: Medway Trams
« Reply #52 on: June 21, 2011, 00:45:33 »
Scrolling through, I've just realised this one has not appeared here yet. Brompton High Street, 1902. No tram, but you can see the tramway turning from the High Street into Westcourt Street, the scene of the tragic accident in that year. After the accident the tramway was moved to Middle Street (the route the busses still follow!)

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Offline davidt

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Re: Medway Trams
« Reply #51 on: June 20, 2011, 23:03:29 »
The roadsweeper one is one of my favourites. Very unusual and not many cards of this location either.

The "seat and lamp" in Military Road was actually a horse trough. I have another fantastic card of a horse drinking from it and as there's a tram in the background I can justify putting it on here! It's one of my favourite cards in my entire collection. I believe it was a memorial to someone. I remember reading about it somewhere. Perhaps someone on the forum will know....


Offline Sentinel S4

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Re: Medway Trams
« Reply #50 on: June 20, 2011, 21:06:14 »
Fantastic. Thyese really bring the system alive. Nice to see a roadsaweeper (Luto Road pic) working. These wre needed to keep the rails clear of the more solid horse exhaust, bad contact for Earth and slippery for traction. Bet that little girl in Gillingham High Street would not be able to stand there now, what happened to the Lamp and Seat in the middle of Military Road? Important enough to divert the rails around it. Really great pics, many thanks Sentinel S4.
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Offline davidt

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Re: Medway Trams
« Reply #49 on: June 20, 2011, 20:32:35 »
Thanks for your comments everyone. Glad you liked the cards. Here are a few more from my collection.

































Other than duplicates of similar views, that's probably about it.

Offline Sentinel S4

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Re: Medway Trams
« Reply #48 on: June 20, 2011, 11:34:13 »
I am lead to believe that my Gt Grandfather worked as a delivery/collection driver for Aveling's for a short time. One morning he collected a Roller from Bearstead and brought her back over Bluebell Hill and whilst decending Star Hill she dropped out of gear. I think this was the reason she was being returned to the works. Suddenly he had an out of control machine and a steep hill with a huge slipery tram junction at the bottom. I am told that he some how managed to get her sideways into Rochester High Street without touching the sides. He kept his job with thanks from several shop keepers who stated that he seemed to skid the roller on the tram lines to get round. I would like to have met this one as he was a Character of the first Order. Regards, Sentinel S4.
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Offline Leofwine

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Re: Medway Trams
« Reply #47 on: June 20, 2011, 11:04:25 »
The next to last picture is Dock Road. But "hear, hear!" to Swiftone's comment.

At the time of the photo Dock Road only ran from the Church to the Dockyard Main Gate. The section in the picture was indeed known as military road, which at this time ran from present-day Military Road up to the Church, then up behind Fort Amherst (part of what is now Khartoum Road, the road that comes off Dock Road past the entrance to Fort Amherst and the Barracks), then down what we now know as Maxwell Road/Mansion Row to Brompton Barracks (I think by this time the section from the barracks down to the lower lines was no longer called Military Road).   The stretch in the photo had also been known as Church Lane during the 18th & 19th centuries (and probably earlier).

And I agree, they are a brilliant set of images.
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Offline Lyn L

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Re: Medway Trams
« Reply #46 on: June 20, 2011, 09:43:43 »
Yes, great photo's . The one of Gillingham High St showing the lower end ( Library end ) was good as most old pics show it from the other end. Still can't see Rix's though which was on the corner of Saxton St. Thanks for sharing them. :)
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Offline davidt

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Re: Medway Trams
« Reply #45 on: June 19, 2011, 23:34:03 »
I've added a few tram pictures from my postcard collection. Various views from across Medway.



















Offline peterchall

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Re: Medway Trams
« Reply #44 on: March 03, 2011, 00:43:25 »
The main generating station was next to the tram depot on Luton Road. It can be seen in this photo (long after it closed):
http://www.kenthistoryforum.co.uk/index.php?topic=5662.0
And in this map:
http://www.kenthistoryforum.co.uk/index.php?topic=8945.msg73508#msg73508

There is no generating station indicated in Manor Road on the 1907 map of Chatham.
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Re: Medway Trams
« Reply #43 on: March 02, 2011, 22:49:30 »
Me grandad said that the Tram power station was down Manor rd Chatham is that right does anyone know ?

Offline cliveh

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Re: Medway Trams
« Reply #42 on: March 02, 2011, 14:45:03 »
Just found this one. Looks like Dock Road?



cliveh

Offline Megapack162

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Re: Medway Trams
« Reply #41 on: November 11, 2010, 10:52:41 »
That's interesting. I hadn't realised the Westcourt Street crash was so early in the Medway Trams' services. I wonder if such a major incident (4 dead, 50+ in hospital) had an adverse affect on what was a business still in its infancy?

There weren't exactly many alternatives to the trams, they operated within what we now call the Medway Towns (I'd rather it was still Chatham, Rochester, Strood, Gillingham and Rainham in no particular order).
A regular bus service was still some way off, as the 1st service between Maidstone and Chatham didn't start until 1908 and even then it was pretty unsuccessful. The manufacturer repossessed their buses and operated the service themselves until Mr Walter Flexman French took over the route and eventually registered M&D as a PLC. The rest is history....

Offline Leofwine

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Re: Medway Trams
« Reply #40 on: November 10, 2010, 18:01:17 »
That's interesting. I hadn't realised the Westcourt Street crash was so early in the Medway Trams' services. I wonder if such a major incident (4 dead, 50+ in hospital) had an adverse affect on what was a business still in its infancy?
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Offline peterchall

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Re: Medway Trams
« Reply #39 on: November 10, 2010, 17:52:12 »
The first tram services were wholly within Chatham and Gillingham and started in 1902 but, after initial opposition from Rochester, were extended there by 1905. The final extension to Rainham occurred in 1906. Service frequencies were 10-15 minutes but published time-tables showed only the beginning and end points of the route and the departure time at the start of the journey - you had to know your local geography in those days!

In 1927 the British Thompson-Houston Co sold its interest in the Chatham and District Light Railway Co to M&D. An Act of Parliament in 1929 authorised C&DLRC to run buses and to change its name to Chatham and District Traction Co. Buses could run over the existing tram routes and, with the council's approval, anywhere within 12 miles of Chatham Town Hall. There would be protection from competition provided the company ran "adequate satisfactory services". As a separate issue, the Road Traffic Act of 1930 created Traffic Areas in which Traffic Commissioners would regulate bus services. Thus C&Ds bus services began on 1st October 1930.
Acknowledgements for some of this information to the booklet published by 'Friends of Chatham Traction'.
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Re: Medway Trams
« Reply #38 on: November 10, 2010, 16:47:16 »
No trams ran after September 1930. Many were laid up on the stretch of track towards Rainham awaiting the breakers' torches. Work began on laying the tracks in March 1900.  No other trams ran in Medway after 1930. I have some details of the rolling stock which may be of interest. In all there were 52 seperate cars running at various times on the system.

Cars 1-25    These were built by George Milnes and Co.  They had 24 seats inside and 28 on top.  The 1902 accident memtioned above was suffered by car 19, later to be turned into Works Car 19 as described above.
Cars 26-35   These were Brush built cars supplied in 1903. They had 22 seats on the lower deck and 26 on top.
Car 36  This was delivered in 1903 as a replacement for Car 19.  
Cars 37-48  Built at Loughbrough again by Brush, the lower saloon seating 22 people and the upper deck seating 26. They were delivered in two batches; ?&-46 in 1907,  47 and 48 in 1911.
Cars 49-51   Built by UEC at Preston and assembled at Luton Depot in 1911. These were slightly larger than the Chatham norm, seating 24 inside and 26 outside. Weighing 13 tons, these were some of the heaviest trams ever to run in Britain.
Car 52   This car was aquired from The Maidstone system and entered service in 1928 but was prone to derailments. Saw out its life on the Rainham route.

Unfortunately none of these cars were preserved.

 

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