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Author Topic: Medway Trams  (Read 51583 times)

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Offline karlostg

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Re: Medway Trams
« Reply #7 on: November 06, 2009, 14:17:21 »
Going back to Trams, just found this in my postcard collection

Offline peterchall

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Re: Medway Trams
« Reply #6 on: November 06, 2009, 13:32:03 »
First of all, looking through the left hand arch, Chatham Hill seems to bend the wrong way and has a tram cable pole in the middle of the road! However, let's ignore that.

                

Apart from the tram tracks and wires, and a few other small points such as the street lamps, this picture could represent any time up to the 1970s. I moved to Luton in 1970 and soon after that we had to endure the delays caused by the reorganisation of the traffic flow round the arches, so I'm sure that happened in early to mid 1970s.

Previous to then the traffic was 2-way round all sides of the arches, as well as through the archway of Magpie Hall Road (picture below), just out of view to the right. Rather chaotic!

The toilets are the low building in front of the arches and there was a passage between them and the arches. The bus stop I mentioned in my Reply#10 was by the left hand arch. I can't remember whether the slipper baths were in the same block as the toilets or in the bricked up arches that can be seen behind the toilets.

                                   Magpie Hall Road
                              
It's no use getting old if you don't get artful

merc

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Re: Medway Trams
« Reply #5 on: May 08, 2009, 20:49:46 »
Great photo's Numanfan :)

Here's a Tram in Canterbury Street ,Gillingham, near the Rock Avenue junction. I tried to catch a tram here the other day, but someone said i was over 70 years too late...



Photo borrowed from Colin Haggart.

merc

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Re: Medway Trams
« Reply #4 on: May 08, 2009, 19:43:45 »
Good stuff Merc, very interesting.
I cant make out where the last picture in Rochester is - any clues?

Cheers  Karlos.
it's just by the bridge.

On the left is the Gundolf Public House,behind it is the White Hart (now called Expectations according to the book) and opposite is the Crown Hotel. The Gundolf PH and all the properties beyond it as far as the White Hart were demolished when the railway bridge was converted to road use and the junction with Corporation Street widened between 1968 and 1970.


smiler

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Re: Medway Trams
« Reply #3 on: May 08, 2009, 16:36:54 »
The first picture show that they had at least two types of body the staircase can be seen going over the drivers head in one, the other the stairway starts behind the driver and climbs the reverse way, its interesting to see that the pickup from the overhead electric wire is by a wheel that is forced under the wire , the Trolly version,  not a wide Bow Collector, the four window version was very popular built by Brush of Loughborough. ***

Offline karlostg

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Re: Medway Trams
« Reply #2 on: May 08, 2009, 14:04:55 »
Good stuff Merc, very interesting.
I cant make out where the last picture in Rochester is - any clues?

merc

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Medway Trams
« Reply #1 on: May 08, 2009, 12:41:34 »

October 1st,1930 Chatham Traction Company introduces double-decker buses and the old trams were removed from service to a reserve section of track in Watling Street to await their fate. Trams in Medway had been running for 28 years, but now their time was up and it was time for the Motor Bus to take over. The Medway Tramway Company (run by the Chatham and District Light Railway) began with 25 Double-decker tramcars which soon become very popular and increased to a fleet of over 40.


Gillingham High Street 1909, looking Eastwards from Canterbury Street.
Originally the New Brompton (Gillingham) High Street was just the section between Canterbury Street and Park Road (Now Marlborough Road) and that section of High Street was called "Wellington Place". It was later changed to "High Street" and extended to the section of road all the way to the Railway Station.


The first Tram through Rochester was in April 1908. New Lines were opened between 1904 and 1908, eventually to Strood and then to Strood Hill or Frindsbury imediatly after the "Special" featured in the picture. All Trams were open-topped and restricted to a maximum of 16mph.

 

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