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Author Topic: 1838, Mugging at Chatham Lines  (Read 4421 times)

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Offline karlostg

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Re: 1838, Mugging at Chatham Lines
« Reply #6 on: May 19, 2009, 20:03:39 »
correct , but downstairs is the Subway sandwich bar.

Pledge

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Re: 1838, Mugging at Chatham Lines
« Reply #5 on: May 19, 2009, 19:15:26 »
what is at 257 high street now?

Apparently it is Ebdon Studios, a photographic shop. It's opposite the Fish and Chip shop (assuming that's still there) and is near Iceland/KFC.

Chatham_Girl85

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Re: 1838, Mugging at Chatham Lines
« Reply #4 on: May 19, 2009, 18:43:52 »
what is at 257 high street now?

Offline kyn

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Re: 1838, Mugging at Chatham Lines
« Reply #3 on: May 19, 2009, 13:32:16 »
Thanks for adding the info about the pub!  


Offline karlostg

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Re: 1838, Mugging at Chatham Lines
« Reply #2 on: May 19, 2009, 13:25:20 »
The Dartmouth Arms, was at 257 High Street, Chatham

Offline kyn

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1838, Mugging at Chatham Lines
« Reply #1 on: May 19, 2009, 13:00:51 »
22 August 1838

On Saturday evening last, about 9 o'clock, as Mr. Scott, watch and clock maker, Week-street, Maidstone, was returning from Gillingham to Chatham, where he had to carry home a clock that he had to repair, on crossing Chatham-Lines he was stopped by two private soldiers, who demanded his money.  Mr. Scott resisted, and he was felled to the ground.  One of the soldiers knelt on his body; and, seizing him by the throat, endeavoured to throttle him, while the other rifled his pockets, and took from his person 5s. 6d., being all the money he had about him.  Mr. Scott fortunately bit the fellow very severely on the fore finger of the right hand who attempted to strangle him.  From the ill usage Mr. Scott received he was obliged to remain in Chatham all night, and repaired to the barracks next morning, and acquainted the commanding officer of the outrage and robbery.  No time was lost, the bugle was sounded, and the soldiers mustered, and in calling over the names two soldiers were missing.  Pickets were despatched in all directions, and one of the men, named Thistlewood, son of Thistlewood, who was hung for the Cato-street conspiracy, was found in a loft at the back of Dartmouth Arms, Chatham.  The other, Fitzpatrick, was found concealed on Chatham Lines.  Both men were brought to the barracks, and were clearly identified.  Thistlewood?s finger was very much festered where Mr. Scott had bit him.  Both soldiers were given up to the civil power, and on Monday last they were had up before the county magistrates; the Rev. George Davies and Colonel Best, and were fully committed to Maidstone to take their trial.  The soldiers enlisted about 10 months back, and belong to the 50th Regiment. - West Kent Guardian.

 

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