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Author Topic: St Mary's Casemated Barracks, Chatham  (Read 22644 times)

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merc

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Re: St Mary's Casemated Barracks, Chatham
« Reply #26 on: September 27, 2011, 12:04:53 »
I was just looking through part of the 1871 Census and noticed the entry for "St Mary Barracks And Brompton Huts, Chatham, Gillingham."  I'm presuming Brompton Huts refers to the Hut Barracks that were replaced in 1872-4 with the RE Institute (so this record probably shows the last troops to occupy that site).


According to The Morning Post, the hut barracks were moved to a site near St. Mary's Barracks in about October 1871. A quantity of tackle was borrowed from the Dockyard to help in their removal.

merc

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Re: St Mary's Casemated Barracks, Chatham
« Reply #25 on: September 25, 2011, 20:40:23 »
November 19, 1888.

Fatal Golf Accident

On Saturday while some youths were playing golf at St. Mary's Barracks, Chatham, one named Frank Richard Bennett, missed the ball in striking and accidentally hit a companion named William Richard Chapman behind the ear with the club. Chapman fell down insensible, and expired almost immediatly.

From The York Herald.


I've heard about the golf course at the barracks before, does anyone know where it was please?

Offline Leofwine

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Re: St Mary's Casemated Barracks, Chatham
« Reply #24 on: July 20, 2011, 15:51:56 »
I have an original copy of the article Merc quotes from above, so I thought I'd add the illustration and supply a copy of the full article.



This engraving, entitled "Soldier's Reading-room, St. Mary's Barracks, Chatham" appeared in the Illustrated London News of Saturday 8th March 1856. The accompanying article reads:

SOLDIERS' READING-ROOM, ST. MARY'S BARRACKS, CHATHAM.
THIS extended line of Barracks was built during the Peninsular War, and was first used to accommodate the French prisoners: here it was so many expressed their sense of the great consideration shown them by the Government of this country. When the barracks ceased to be in requisition for the above purpose they underwent material alteration, and, after being rendered bomb-proof were converted into extensive powder magazines, continuing to be used as such for many years. Being at a considerable distance from the other buildings occupied by troops, and great inconvenience arising from this cause, detached powder magazines, more compact and contiguous to the different stations, were erected; when St. Mary's Barracks were used as stores for the Royal Engineers. As our Indian territory increased a corresponding supply of well-trained young men from the Provisional Battalion became necessary; in consequence of which. during one period of the year especially, the entire space of Chatham Barracks was required for this additional influx, and then it was thought expedient to appropriate a part of St. Mary's for the reception of such regiments as might arrive from foreign stations, or as a temporary barrack for a part of the Provisional Battalion instead of sending them to Canterbury.
The annual return of between three and four thousand soldiers from India and the British Colonies - who, either from impaired health, or, having served their full term, were considered exempt from further active service - induced the authorities to decide upon St. Mary's Barracks as the fittest place for them, and since the year 1844 they have been exclusively set apart for the temporary quarters of such previous to their final disposal.
The situation of St. Mary's Barracks is remarkable for salubrity of air, and the surrounding scenery is exceedingly picturesque. On the east, the river Medway extends as far as the eye can reach, studded with numbers of men of-war, and enlivened by the constant passing of vessels. Towards the south, the rich valley of Gillingham and Rainham presents a pleasing view, which, during summer and autumn, is rendered still more attractive by its numerous cherry and apple orchards. On the west, Upna Castle, with it surrounding panoramic scenery, and the river in the foreground, invariably offers a pleasing prospect. Indeed, St. Mary's Invalid Barracks, standing on a light loamy soil, within the line of fortifications, are capable, with their many natural advantages, of being rendered by a little taste a most desirable station.
St. Mary's Barracks have, of late, been a place of special interest, they having been the receptacle of so many thousands of men - some, after a long and honourable career, to return to the place of their birth, carrying with them the rewards of merit; some, less fortunate, to whom loss of health in a tropical clime has proved a barrier to their promotion; and last, though not least, the fearful number of the wounded, whose military career has been arrested by those many casualties war so necessarily entails. The Barracks have lately been honoured with the visits - first of his Royal highness Prince Albert, when he became a spectator of the mode of attack, scaling of walls, hand•grenading, and the explosion of mines, attending a siege; and next by that of her Most Gracious Majesty the Queen to such of her brave army as returned invalided from the seat of war.
For the use of the invalids in the Barracks, a Library is now being fitted up in one of the rooms of the Upper Gallery, and will form a most important feature of attraction to the soldiers, and a general acquisition to these Barracks. About 800 volumes of historical and miscellaneous works have already been provided. Bookshelves are to be arranged on each side, a table extending down the centre, and the apartment will be lighted with gas. The heads of the different departments of the garrison have been very anxious for this important object; and it will, doubtless, be a great inducement for numbers of the invalids to remain quietly in barracks instead of passing their time so unprofitably in the town.
The accompanying illustration shows the Reading-room, as far as this very desirable improvement has progressed.

This article gives a very different impression of the barracks than is seen in an account by George Russell Dartnell (1799-1878), an army surgeon who was, at that time, Deputy Inspector-General of Hospitals. He wrote a manuscript entitled “A few brief Anecdotes connected with Her Majesty’s visit to the Hospitals at Chatham, 1855-6, written by G. R. Dartnell, D.I.G.H.” from which the following extract is taken recounting Queen Victoria and Prince Albert's visit to the barracks in June 1855:

After inspecting the men on the ground the Queen and party walked across to see the Casemate Barracks, about which so much has been said and written of late. She went into one or two of the upper rooms and was quite horrified at them. “Are these really the barrack rooms of these Invalids?” she said to me: I said, “Yes indeed they are your Majesty” And Prince Albert, looking over towards the splendid Convict Prison recently built in view of the Casemate Barracks, said “Well it seems very extraordinary that there should be no difficulty in obtaining money to erect a magnificent building like this for convicts, and that it should be impossible to find the means of building a commonly comfortable Barrack for convalescent soldiers.
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merc

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Re: St Mary's Casemated Barracks, Chatham
« Reply #23 on: July 19, 2011, 21:27:38 »
March 8, 1856

St Mary's Barracks Reading Room

A library is now being set up for the invalids in one of the rooms in the Upper Gallery. About 800 volumes of historical and miscelleneous works have been provided. Book shelves are to be arranged on each side with a table extending down the centre. The apartment will be lighted with gas. The heads of the different departments of the Garrison have been anxious for the new library and hope numbers of the invalids to remain quietly in barracks instead of passing their time so unprofitably in the town.

Source: The Illustrated London News.


Offline Leofwine

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Re: St Mary's Casemated Barracks, Chatham
« Reply #22 on: June 14, 2011, 14:34:30 »
I was just looking through part of the 1871 Census and noticed the entry for "St Mary Barracks And Brompton Huts, Chatham, Gillingham."  I'm presuming Brompton Huts refers to the Hut Barracks that were replaced in 1872-4 with the RE Institute (so this record probably shows the last troops to occupy that site).

The regiment stationed across the two barracks at this time were the 2nd Battalion 23rd Royal Welch Fusiliers (plus a corporal and a private from the 6th Dragoon Guards). One thing I did find of interest was the number of women and girls (wives, daughters and servants) living in the barracks. Of the 864 people recorded, 115 were female, a little over 13% of the population.
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Offline Leofwine

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Re: St Mary's Casemated Barracks, Chatham
« Reply #21 on: February 16, 2011, 00:16:26 »
I was looking through an account of Queen Victoria's visits to wounded soldiers in Brompton in 1855-6 (victims of the Crimean War) and from that it seems the Casemated Barracks were used for convalescent soldiers at that time. It also seems that both Queen Victoria and Prince Albert were both unimpressed with the state of them.  Here are the relevant passages from “A few brief Anecdotes connected with Her Majesty’s visit to the Hospitals at Chatham, 1855-6, written by G. R. Dartnell, D.I.G.H.”

From Brompton she drove to St. Mary’s, where she inspected upwards of six hundred convalescents drawn up in line. The answers of some of the men to her questions, and their mode of address often amused her, as for instance, one, in replying would say – “Oh, yes ma’am!” another would say “Oh no, miss, Your Majesty, I mean,” or “Your Highness,” the poor fellows were so confused that they said, as often as not saying no for yes or vice versa. One man, asked a question by Lord Hardinge, and in the confusion of his thoughts addressed him as “Your Majesty!” The Queen heard this, turned to his Lordship and laughed.

After inspecting the men on the ground the Queen and party walked across to see the Casemate Barracks, about which so much has been said and written of late. She went into one or two of the upper rooms and was quite horrified at them. “Are these really the barrack rooms of these Invalids?” she said to me: I said, “Yes indeed they are your Majesty” And Prince Albert, looking over towards the the splendid Convict Prison recently built in view of the Casemate Barracks, said “Well it seems very extraordinary that there should be no difficulty in obtaining money to erect a magnificent building like this for convicts, and that it should be impossible to find the means of building a commonly comfortable Barrack for convalescent soldiers.”
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Offline Leofwine

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Re: St Mary's Casemated Barracks, Chatham
« Reply #20 on: February 09, 2011, 04:16:03 »
St Mary's Barracks c. 1870


Photograph reproduced by permission of the Royal Engineers Museum www.re-museum.co.uk
Larger versions here: http://www.flickr.com/photos/22124479@N03/5430135292/in/photostream/

St. Mary’s Barracks were built between 1779 and 1782 to house convicts and prisoners who built the fort and worked in its associated brickfields. These later became known as St. Mary’s Barracks and remained in use until their demolition in the 1960s.

St Mary's Barracks were occupied by Infantry to 1881, then by the R.E. Ballon Establishment and Submarine Miners. From 1893 to 1925 it was occupied by the R.E. Service Bn or Depot, then by miscellaneous R.E. and other units. It was taken over by the R.N. in 1941.

That about exhausts my knowledge, but I'm sure someone here will know much more.
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Offline kyn

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Re: St Mary's Casemated Barracks, Chatham
« Reply #19 on: May 24, 2010, 16:21:51 »

Offline kyn

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Re: St Mary's Casemated Barracks, Chatham
« Reply #18 on: May 04, 2010, 22:06:11 »
Proposed guns at the barracks.

Offline kyn

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Re: St Mary's Casemated Barracks, Chatham
« Reply #17 on: April 27, 2010, 10:18:58 »
 :)

Offline kyn

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Re: St Mary's Casemated Barracks, Chatham
« Reply #16 on: April 21, 2010, 10:03:28 »
 :)

Offline kyn

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Re: St Mary's Casemated Barracks, Chatham
« Reply #15 on: April 19, 2010, 13:10:24 »
 :)

Offline kyn

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Re: St Mary's Casemated Barracks, Chatham
« Reply #14 on: April 16, 2010, 13:21:14 »
 :)

Offline kyn

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Re: St Mary's Casemated Barracks, Chatham
« Reply #13 on: April 16, 2010, 11:25:37 »
I do not know about any offers the papers have given out, I have only been involved dow there for about 18 months.

The ditches run reasonable unchanged as far as Sally Port Gardens, from here they have been infilled for a short distance.  They start again in MoD land and are mostly remaining apart from a small section running under Khyber Road whiuch has been infilled.  The whole of the end of the lines have been lost with the construction of the Naval Barracks, Kitchener Barracks.

Offline TowerWill

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Re: St Mary's Casemated Barracks, Chatham
« Reply #12 on: April 16, 2010, 08:01:18 »
Yes that would be an interesting experience Kyn.I would say that would be a two tablet job with my particular problems!Wasn't a newspaper offering reduced rate trips around the fort and undeveloped areas a couple of years back?Are the Lines unbroken down to where St. Mary's Barracks were or has there been infilling etc?

 

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