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Author Topic: Barming Oakwood asylum  (Read 23262 times)

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Offline Belindabee

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Re: Barming Oakwood asylum
« Reply #45 on: July 03, 2014, 16:31:23 »
Thank you so much Steve, I may yet need some help with finding some things out. Belinda x

Offline mad4amanda

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Re: Barming Oakwood asylum
« Reply #44 on: July 03, 2014, 11:03:32 »
Belinda, I agree! I am from a generation that did not have to pay the ultimate sacrifice as I grew up in a period of comparative peace. Who are we to judge what happened to those young men, either while they were there on the front or on leave or in the aftermath.  Every bit of footage I see from the wars shows the level of violence and extremes that they were put to it is because of the sacrifice of those men like your relative that we did not have to find out how we would react; and I include totally those who came back who often sacrificed their youth, fitness and sanity for us. Luckily I am old enough to have met, as a child, several who served in WWI who were neighbours and family members.
Good luck in your search, if you come to need a man on the ground again in Maidstone to check anything out it would be a pleasure to assist.
kindest regards
steve

Offline Belindabee

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Re: Barming Oakwood asylum
« Reply #43 on: July 03, 2014, 10:37:01 »
Thank you for looking for me, I know and one reason that I wanted to know was to put some flowers there for him. The families dirty little secret just makes me more determined to find him. Oh, where to start though? I can't imagine what would make humans react like that to their own kith and kin, no matter what the history is behind it. I know no one in the family never even mentioned him, and yet he had been a soldier in the First World War, that did not even count, bless him. I'm guessing they were either disgusted about what he did out there or the fact that he actually contracted the disease. Either way when I spoke to my son about it, he put it into perspective, that if you didn't know if you were coming back from the war alive wouldn't you want to find the comfort of another woman too. He is right. Initially I was of the same opinion as the close relatives around him, in that I was disgusted with it. He could he when he had a young wife and very young children at home. Then the more I thought about what my son had said, the more I want to find him. According to a thesis I read, there was more World War One soldiers that contracted it in the war than at any other time. There were prostitutes in an abundance there, trying to get food on the tables of their young ones too. There were expensive ones that were monitored for diseases and there were the ones that were cheaper and they were a bit hit and miss as to whether they had the condition. Because soldiers had limited money and what they did have paid for their cigarettes and other little luxuries they did want or was sen thome, so paying for a service even then had to be the cheaper option. So it explained a lot to me. Now to find him. Thank you again Belinda x

Offline mad4amanda

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Re: Barming Oakwood asylum
« Reply #42 on: July 03, 2014, 09:34:43 »
Belindabee you may not have seen my post in the other thread where you asked about this. I live in walking distance of the cemetery and looked at every grave stone and memorial for you. I`m afraid to say only a minute fraction of what must be there are marked with any stone and there is no stone or marker for Ernest Winsall.
I found it a very sad place as it is clear that most were simply as forgotten in death as I guess they were in life, the inconvenient reminders of how frail the human condition can be.

Offline Belindabee

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Re: Barming Oakwood asylum
« Reply #41 on: July 02, 2014, 15:36:54 »
Moriarty01, do you still live in the housing complex that was Oakwood? If so can you do me a huge, huge favour, if you don't know already? Could you look to see if my great grandad is buried there, he died in 1931 and his name is Ernest Winsall. I did get in contact with the library in Maidstone and was told that not many of the graves could be seen or were legible. But just wondered if he is buried there. He was the families dirty little secret after contracting syphillis during the First World War, he was put into Oakwood in 1926. I have contacted the local cemetery where the family plot is and he is not in there. Apparently it was quite expensive to actually bring a body across borders from Kent to London, so the chances are that he is in there.

Thank you in advance for any help you can offer.

Kind regards
Belinda

Offline Belindabee

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Re: Barming Oakwood asylum
« Reply #40 on: July 02, 2014, 15:10:08 »
Riding with Angels, have you ever found or have pictures of Ernest Winsall in the graveyard at Oakwood. I'm trying to trace where my great grandfather is buried, I know he died in Oakwood in 1931? When I contact the library/history centre they said it was that overgrown there that none of them could be seen apart from one of the workers and a superintendent who worked there once.

Charlie

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Re: Barming Oakwood asylum
« Reply #39 on: September 24, 2013, 09:44:24 »
Thank you very much Herb Collector that is great. Appreciate all the help. Charlie

Offline ann

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Re: Barming Oakwood asylum
« Reply #38 on: September 21, 2013, 13:56:41 »
Well done Herb Collector, what an  amazing detailed record you have found for Charlie

Offline HERB COLLECTOR

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Re: Barming Oakwood asylum
« Reply #37 on: September 20, 2013, 18:45:28 »
It seems that George White was discharged from the Military Wing of the County of Middlesex Hospital, St Albans, to Barming, where he committed suicide.
see http://www.kentfallen.com/PDF reports/WHITE G.J.pdf

Offline HERB COLLECTOR

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Re: Barming Oakwood asylum
« Reply #36 on: September 20, 2013, 16:19:44 »
Hi Charlie.
Private George Joseph White.
Buried Swanscombe Cemetery. Grave 2233.
http://www.cwgc.org/find-war-dead/casualty/75229380/white, george joseph

Charlie

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Re: Barming Oakwood asylum
« Reply #35 on: September 20, 2013, 15:14:17 »
Hi
I am trying to find the grave of Private George Joseph White who I believe died at the hospital on 8th September 1917.
Would anyone know where the grave is and if it is marked please?
I have been looking for the grave without success, any ideas would be gratefully received.
Thank you

Offline AlanH

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Re: Barming Oakwood asylum
« Reply #34 on: August 17, 2013, 09:38:19 »
I've just spotted this thread and Barming Oakwood has some relevance to my family in two ways. My Mum, now deceased, worked there as a young girl in the 1930s I believe, and a relation was incarcerated there for some time, for what reason I do not know.
But knowing some members of my family I'm not surprised......
My elder sister (presently hospitalised in NZ) may know more and I'll post it here if it is relevant when I find out from her.
AlanH.

Offline cliveh

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Re: Barming Oakwood asylum
« Reply #33 on: August 16, 2013, 16:35:38 »
Some photos from a visit today. I have to say it looks far less grim now then when I first saw it about 30 years ago!

railtond

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Re: Barming Oakwood asylum
« Reply #32 on: March 31, 2013, 15:43:57 »
I have just joined the Forum and I thought it may be of interest on this thread to tell you of my experience trying to obtain Oakwood Hospital patient records in respect of someone who died there in 1972.

I obtained basic admission information from the Centre for Kentish Studies. One has then to prove to the Kent & Medway NHS Information Rights Department that you are a relative. Once I had done this they told me that “As an organisation we maintain our records in accordance with Department of Health retention periods which lay out a minimum retention period of 8 years following death of an individual or 25-30 years following cessation of treatment. In this regard, any information we may have held regarding care and treatment provided in the 1970s or earlier is likely to have been securely destroyed.”

Offline kyn

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Re: Barming Oakwood asylum
« Reply #31 on: November 13, 2012, 15:22:32 »
In December 1881 a matron was accused of cruelty whilst working at this asylum.  She was taken to court after hitting a patient named Priscella Bear during the previous October.  It seems the matron received a fine.  Some of the newspaper has ripped away losing some of the information.

 

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