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Author Topic: Evacuation WW2  (Read 23560 times)

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Offline AlanH

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Re: Evacuation WW2
« Reply #29 on: October 29, 2017, 08:39:27 »
Hi Anne. I was evacuated with my mum to Sheffield in 1944 when I was about 3 months old. Mum passed away at 90 but I remember her telling about the first house she was sent to and the amount of men "visitors" going in and out at all times.
Eventually she decided it was house of ill repute (how polite that sounds now) and went out in the road and stopped a passing car. Must remember that mum was in a totally foreign place where the people spoke funny..... Luckily it was a Doctor driving the car who went into the house with her and took us both back to the evacuation people. Apparently he gave them a good ticking off at the same time.
My older siblings went to the west country I think.
AlanH.

PS. I blame that time in the "house of ill repute" for my bad behaviour since.....  :)

Offline lutonman1

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Re: Evacuation WW2
« Reply #28 on: October 28, 2017, 13:03:32 »
Reply to Dave Smith, The year was 1940, at end of June, that we went to Wales.Dave.

Offline lutonman1

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Re: Evacuation WW2
« Reply #27 on: October 11, 2017, 19:19:52 »
The first evacuation from September 1939, to Newington.lasted only a few months. Then in June/July
we went from Chatham rail station on a through trip to Neath, from there, we were put on buses, my
brother and I, taken to a Pontardawe hall, my brother went south to Clydach, I went north to Ynymeadw,
about a mile from Pontardawe, billited with a nice older lady, and her daughter, I was almost 12 she was
13. I got to know a girl 12 from a hill farm, we used to knock about together. Her brother was in the R.A.F. Then soon, he was killed in a flying accident, I attended the funeral with her, he had a volley of six rifles fired over him. Then the lady broke her leg, and could not look after me, so I moved across the road, to a lady, the husband was a miner, the son a quarry worker. When they had a bath nightly, the father would bathe first, turning the water black, the son next, turning the water white. the worse thing about that was the lady used to visit friends, and never returned home until 5.15, so iI was locked out of the house, until she returned. i sat in the outside toilet until she returned, rain or no rain. I told my mother in a letter, I  was moved to Pontardawe, to an engine driver and wife, they swore like troopers. Mother
then decided we should both come home, we came home with our science master, June 30 1941 --  MoK

Offline Dave Smith

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Re: Evacuation WW2
« Reply #26 on: September 29, 2017, 12:18:59 »
lutonman1 What year was that? We, Barnsole Road School, Gillingham, were firstly evacuated to Herne Bay, the day before war was declared and a year later- as the Germans were in France by then- to South Wales, Bargoid, 15 miles N. of Cardiff. Two distinct eras; as was Gillingham County School who went to Sandwich & then Rhymney ( again " up the valleys"). 

Offline lutonman1

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Re: Evacuation WW2
« Reply #25 on: September 28, 2017, 18:43:25 »
Our evacuation was a bit strange as we all trooped down to Chatham Station from Glencoe Road school,
put on a train then, off we go, Gillingham, Rainham, Newington, then we had arrived, at our destination.
My brother and I  were billeted with an old Barge Master, in Church Lane, then to school in Church Lane.
We decided one Sunday to walk home, the seven miles. Arriving we were given a late lunch, then taken
back to Church Lane, fast. We came back to Glencoe, then after a few weeks, on a train to Pontardawe
in South Wales, ten miles north of Swansea. After school, and after when Swansea had been bombed for three nights running, we lads used to go to the Cum De, a small stream, finding incendiary bombs that  were whole, we flung them at each other across the stream, we realised we could have been horribly burnt, if they had gone off, later. We were there for one year then we returned home. I always thank the Welsh people, for looking after us.

Offline CDP

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Re: Evacuation WW2
« Reply #24 on: May 23, 2015, 20:39:57 »
     
I am not sure if I have posted this elsewhere (Sorry, but I can't find it !!!!!!)
.
A FEW MEMORIES OF AN EVACUEE IN WALES.
(Colin Penney)

 When the war broke out I had just left the Broadway School in Sheerness and was due to start at Jefferson Road School, Sheerness,  (The Central School for Boys) but nobody seemed concerned  about our schooling, when we were to start or where to go, we thought  this arrangement was ideal at first until the weeks went by and we started to feel fed up and  guilty???( pardon!)

In November it was getting too cold to play on the beach, so ten or so of us decided to demand to be taught and we marched up to Jefferson Road and presented ourselves to the Headmaster. I don’t think he was very pleased to see us and he took us to his office. He then split us into two groups and he told us that one group was to attend lessons in the mornings and the other group in the afternoons but, he said, should the air raid sirens sound we were to go home immediately, even if we were on our way to school. Of course, most of the school were late most mornings just in case the sirens sounded and we had to walk all that way home again. The sirens of course sounded quite frequently and almost every day there were either practice Fire Drills or practice Air Raid Drills or practice Gas Drill or practice something and sometimes the alarms never went off but by word of mouth (usually from another boy!) we heard that we were to go home. I sometimes wondered whether these were false, false alarms.!! But no one ever bothered. .A few of us started the rumour one day to see what would happen and we cleared the school, even the Teachers went home.

Most of the school was evacuated, 1939/early1940. My father went to Alexandria, Egypt with the Dockyard and in June 1940 off I went to Pontlottyn, South Wales to be billeted with another Sheerness boy, Geoffrey Cullum. I was with a Welsh family, Morgan of course. The father was a coal miner, one son, David was the manager of the local food shop and the other son was Abraham the same age as Geoffrey and myself.

There was also a girl, Margaret, but she had been sent to an Auntie in Chepstow, she was away for nine months. We were told she had been naughty. She went to live with a friend later and we seldom saw her. I remember she used to walk up and down the road for exercise, a very happy girl, always smiling at everyone especially the men.

Although David made sure that we were never short of food. When Mrs. Morgan was making a plateful of sandwiches for the three us boys for tea, the plateful was never divisible by three hence the fastest eater had the most sandwiches.

One day a German Bomber was shot down at Aber-cum-Bargoed and we all walked miles over the mountains to collect pieces of it to exchange for cigarette cards, etc.

We went to the local school and all the Sheerness boys were in the same class. We were taught Welsh every Friday afternoon but most weeks the class with the best attendance that particular week were allowed Friday afternoon off school. Naturally, us evacuees always won this, much to the annoyance of the local lads and many fights started because of our gloating. We learnt very little Welsh, I think we could all count up to ten, sing the Welsh National Anthem (sometimes with our own words, “ My hen laid an adder….etc. “, these words almost sound the same), and a few hymns. Very useful especially as Welsh was never spoken by the locals.

I was once arrested as a German Spy (I was only about 12 years old) by the local Police Sergeant Annie as we called  him. A few of us were flying our home made kites and he said these were wireless aerials and we were signalling to the enemy using radios .We had to go to the Station and were duly charged and then released. We changed our mind about this sergeant when a Welsh friend, Douglas Price, drowned in a feeder lake, all the local people turned out to watch and Annie dived and dived and searched for two hours before he found the body, Annie was as blue as our friend Douglas with the ice cold water, we liked Annie after this. Douglas was on show for a few days after this in his front room, he looked so peaceful. All the boys paid their respects.

One pastime was to slide down the mountain on pieces of cardboard or dustbin lids, imagining that we were skiing and when we tired of this the other lads would roll large boulders down to the road below.

We would also dug out coal from surface seams to take home to earn a few pennies. Another way to make money was to act as look-outs for the miners as they gambled in groups among the slag heaps and they would get very cross at any false alarm, especially when a lad would shout out “Here comes the police “ and then start running as if to hide. It was fun to see them all scatter. Sometimes they wouldn’t stop even to collect their money!!!

One day we discovered a ventilation shaft to a disused mine, it was about 10 feet square, very, very deep and strengthened by criss crossed large square wooden beams. We dropped stones down to see how deep it was and a splash occurred after about four seconds. We lit a bonfire and threw it down the shaft to see how deep it was. We tried to see who could climb down farthest, the bravest managed to climb down 20 feet (I could only manage about 10 feet). We played here for a few days and then one day we saw that it had been covered up with tin sheeting and bolted down. Still, perhaps that stopped us from killing ourselves. When you are younger, danger is not really an option is it?

We would combine with the local lads when the boys from Rhymney, the next village, came into our territory to fight. We would meet on the local slag tip and throw the slag at each other. One day the “enemy “ caught one of our side, tied him to a post and used him as a target, throwing stones at him then starting to build a fire at his feet and telling him they were going to roast him alive and eat him. Such fun. He was very pleased when we “charged “ and saved him and cut him free. Then our side caught one of the opposite side and we decided to tattoo him with red hot needles using their bonfire but we let him escape, we weren’t  bad really.

We would always go to Chapel twice on Sunday, or was it three times, or even four, and with our nasty coughs and upset tummy and bad headaches, we were still expected to sing loudly and enjoy ourselves.

 I sat for and passed the exam for the “Tech “ with six other Sheerness boys and we attended The Bargoed Mining and Technical Institute for three months.I then decided to return home after 18 months away. I did not want to become a Welsh miner!!

One thing I did learn there was how to play Rugby properly. Our sports teacher would run up behind us and with his hand behind our neck, throw us at our opponents feet and the very hard football boots came in contact with our face.  It didn’t ‘alf hurt mum.

The Government then decided that those born in 1928 and I think 1929 were to be exempt from the National Service and the Home Guard because our lives had been so badly disrupted and we had such a hard life and our education had been so badly affected, as you can see from the above !!!!

 


 
 
The solution to every problem is a.) time , or  b.) another problem.

Offline Dave Smith

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Re: Evacuation WW2
« Reply #23 on: August 08, 2014, 20:11:58 »
I am new to the Forum but as a 9 year old at Barnsole Road School in 1939, can comment. collinhaggart; I only remember there being the main entrance on the High Street bridge, a side gate was on Balmoral Road to the "goods" end of the platform where we collected bulk paper deliveries. WildWeasel: 1st year of the war( phoney!),schools went into "the countryside",e.g. B.Rd. to Herne Bay (I still keep in touch,75 years on), G'ham County to Sandwich. In 1940, when Germans were in France, re-evacuation further afield; B.Rd. to Bargoed & County to Rhymney ( up the valleys!). My friend & his brother( C.S.)were billeted with the local pastor?( chapel) who was very strict. They had a travelling cinema in the hall on Saturday mornings for the "tuppeny rush". It was just that, 2d ( .8p) to sit on a mat in the front! Numanfan: Definitely not High St. CoOp., King St. had underground toilets at the end & there were shops etc.all along the High St. to the station - which you would see from the CoOp.

Merv

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Re: Evacuation WW2
« Reply #22 on: February 02, 2010, 19:11:36 »
My Late Brother in Law Jim Dent, would have probably been in the photo taken in Gillingham.
He and his cousin were sent to Blackpool and sent back two weeks later for being Naughty.

Monkton Malc

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Re: Evacuation WW2
« Reply #21 on: February 01, 2010, 21:55:27 »
While looking through some old photos tonight, I found this one of my mother in her Clarendon House uniform and it was the only picture she had taken during the whole of her evacuation.
My late aunt Sylvia on the left and my mother on the right..


Monkton Malc

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Re: Evacuation WW2
« Reply #20 on: January 07, 2010, 17:04:08 »
I note that news has already reached Kent that Baswich House has been demolished.

Berkswich History Society are to publish a new book on 1st March called "They Pulled Our House Down" which tells the story of Baswich House from 1800 until it was demolished in March 2009.

The book contains a Chapter on the War Years when it was used by pupils of Clarendon House School, Ramsgate and Miss Helm was headmistress.  I am sure residents of Kent who spent time in Stafford from 1940 - 1944 would be interested in this publication.  Further details will be publ
ished on our website  www.berkswichpc.co.uk/berkswich_history_society.html in the near future.


Thank you for that information :)

I have told my mother and she will look out for the book when it comes out. She did make a comment on Baswich house and that was the corridors were very dark and everything in the building creaked when you walked anywhere.


Malcolm.

Beryl

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Re: Evacuation WW2
« Reply #19 on: January 07, 2010, 12:43:23 »
 I note that news has already reached Kent that Baswich House has been demolished.

Berkswich History Society are to publish a new book on 1st March called "They Pulled Our House Down" which tells the story of Baswich House from 1800 until it was demolished in March 2009.

The book contains a Chapter on the War Years when it was used by pupils of Clarendon House School, Ramsgate and Miss Helm was headmistress.  I am sure residents of Kent who spent time in Stafford from 1940 - 1944 would be interested in this publication.  Further details will be published on our website  www.berkswichpc.co.uk/berkswich_history_soci
ety.html in the near future.

Offline colin haggart

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Re: Evacuation WW2
« Reply #18 on: August 08, 2009, 22:40:54 »
Gillingham train station was further back from where it is today, not much though.   When you you walk down Railway Street on the taxi rank side you get to the gates which are some times open.  This, roughly was where the staion was.

Offline WildWeasel

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Re: Evacuation WW2
« Reply #17 on: August 01, 2009, 21:47:11 »
Interesting....
I will be going to Wales with my father & his brother the weekend of 15 Aug... We are staying in Tredegar which is a mile away from the village they where evacuated to in 1939 ( Need to check dates ! )
Abertyswgg.... is close to Rhymney just south of the Brecon Beacons which I believe is top end of the Rhonnda valley
IE Heart of the Welsh mining community 

If anyone here has information on evacuation of children from Medway to Wales in 1939 please contact me ASAP

Dad was born in November 1935 so would have been nearly 4 years old in 1939...As I recall Albert was a few years older ..I want to say
 seven but even so, a young boy.....

This is classic social history & needs to be documented !!!!

WW

If it's too hard I can't do it !

Jayzi.

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Re: Evacuation WW2
« Reply #16 on: July 01, 2009, 12:18:04 »
Hi all.

Sorry for the late reply newmanfan....ta for the info/clearing my question up. Somewhere in the vast collection of notes/scraps of paper which I`m slowly going through, I think I have notes on a relative who was a manager of a local Co-op. Also ta to Kyn for additional info.

Jayzi.

AnnieM

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Re: Evacuation WW2
« Reply #15 on: June 23, 2009, 16:37:23 »
Hi

Just wanted to say thanks to everyone who has helped - school project going really well and the pictures were a fantastic addition :)

Annie

 

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