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Author Topic: Holy Trinity,Old Brompton.  (Read 26857 times)

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Offline Dave Smith

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Re: Holy Trinity,Old Brompton.
« Reply #37 on: May 26, 2016, 12:08:37 »
MofK. Cheap & cheerful, with the accent on the former- & not much on the latter!

Offline Maid of Kent

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Re: Holy Trinity,Old Brompton.
« Reply #36 on: May 24, 2016, 20:34:20 »
Re reply 18.

I do NOT know the official answer but in the 40/50s and early 60s the attitude to architecture was that we should not ape what had gone before (Roman/Gothic/ Tudor/Georgian/ Victorian/Edwardian styles) That with so much having being destroyed we should build in modern materials like concrete, with smart plain lines - what in fact has become known as New Brutalism. So I have an idea that the builders of the Twydall Estate wanted (and got) something modern!!!!!!!!!! It was all the Rage!

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Re: Holy Trinity,Old Brompton.
« Reply #35 on: February 20, 2014, 12:24:47 »
Hi Torpointblue,
Can you tell me the *address* of the Military/Casualty Hospital by any chance?
Thanks, Joyaa

Please stick to the threads subject.

Thanks.

joyaa

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Re: Holy Trinity,Old Brompton.
« Reply #34 on: February 20, 2014, 10:22:23 »
Hi Torpointblue,
Can you tell me the *address* of the Military/Casualty Hospital by any chance?
Thanks, Joyaa

Offline Leofwine

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Re: Holy Trinity,Old Brompton.
« Reply #33 on: April 03, 2012, 18:02:52 »
I am sure I read somewhere that it closed for general services, eyc in 1950, but remained in use for weddings (and possibly christenings) until c.1953. It was definitely abandoned by the mid 1950s and was demolished by the end of 1958.

The parish of Brompton was absorbed into one of the Gillingham Parishes (St. Marks I think) in the 1950s, but I'm not sure of the exact date. Does anyone know?
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Offline Janetlinda56

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Re: Holy Trinity,Old Brompton.
« Reply #32 on: April 03, 2012, 17:11:29 »
It's been mentioned the church closed in 1950, according to parish records the last wedding was 1953, my auntie married here in 1952'

Offline Leofwine

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Re: Holy Trinity,Old Brompton.
« Reply #31 on: February 23, 2012, 22:50:50 »
Holy Trinity Church Organ... does anyone know anything about this? I met someone recently who said the organ in the church was, in its day, quite unusual as it was one of the first of a particular type, and by an important/well known builder. I have a feeling what made it unusual was that it was one of the first to be powered by electricity (presumably a pump to drive the air rather than bellows.)  Sadly, he only mentioned it in passing and I didn't have a chance to ask further questions.

On looking through the information I have referring to the organ all I can see is that in 1848, when the church was built, "The organ, which in its structure harmonizes with the building, and is a remarkably rich toned instrument, reflects great credit upon the builder of it, Mr. Walker.", and that in December 1943 "The organ was totally destroyed, the roof above it burnt through, the sanctuary badly charred, and the walls of the whole building badly blackened by smoke as the result of an outbreak of fire at Holy Trinity Church.....The organ, which was insured, was in part a memorial of the last war for parents and relatives of men in the parish who made the supreme sacrifice paid for the various organ pipes and a commemorative tablet giving the names of the fallen, was erected on the adjoining wall." and that in the 1950s, when the church was closed, it was planned to move the organ and other church fittings to the new Holy Trinity Church in Twydall (suggesting that after the fire the organ had been rebuilt).

Anyone have any further information on this?
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Offline Leofwine

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Re: Holy Trinity,Old Brompton.
« Reply #30 on: February 02, 2012, 04:37:07 »
Kentish Gazette - Tuesday 2 January 1849

CONSECRATION OF TRINITY CHURCH, BROMPTON, CHATHAM.
The interesting ceremony of the consecration of this church, by the Bishop of Rochester, took place on Wednesday last, the 20th ult. Cards bad been previously issued for the admission of about nine hundred persons, and the church was quite full, without being inconveniently crowded. There was a large attendance of the neighbouring clergy, as well as of the principal officers of the garrison and the various government departments in Chatham, and the leading inhabitants of the town. The Bishop arrived at the church with his chaplains, the Rev. A. H. Barker, and the Rev. G. E. Murray, the Venerable Archdeacon King, and the Deputy Chancellor, Dr. Robertson, at eleven o'clock, and proceeded to the communion table, when the petition to consecrate was presented to him by the Rev. W. Conway. After the petition had been read, the Bishop walked with the clergy round the north and middle aisle of the church, repeating the 24th psalm. The sentence of consecration was then read by Dr. Robertson, and signed by the Bishop: after which the usual service was proceeded with, the morning prayers being read by the Rev. D- Cooke, incumbent of Brompton. A very appropriate sermon was preached by the Rev. E. G. Marsh, vicar of Aylesford, and prebendary of Southwell, on the words "In whom ye also are builded together for an habitation of God through the Spirit." Ephesians ii., 22. The preacher observed that, in condescension to our infirmities, God was pleased to teach heavenly truths by the use of figures derived from earthly objects. Our Saviour's parables were illustrations of this mode of inculcating divine things. The apostles frequently employed the same method in their epistles; and St. Paul, in this chapter, regards the temple at Jerusalem, as a type of the spiritual church of God. That temple had been built by Solomon, and dedicated to the service of the Lord; and He had graciously accepted Solomon's undertaking, by causing His glory to fill the house, and by making it in a peculiar manner, the habitation of his Divine Majesty. From that time to the present, except in seasons of persecution, the servants of God had built places of worship, which had been set apart from all profane and common uses, and dedicated to the service of God. They had met together to-day for the purpose of supplicating the Lord s blessing on a new house of prayer, which had been built for the spiritual welfare of the inhabitants of Brompton, who had hitherto been very scantily supplied with the means of grace. He called on them to thank God for this important benefit: and reminded them that if that church had been erected through the instrumentality of two individuals, it became an imperative duty with them to assist in carrying forward the religious improvement of that neighbourhood, by contributing towards the erection of new schools, for which a collection would be made before the close of the service. Having said thus much of the object of their assembling together on that day the preacher returned to the more immediate subject of his discourse, and observed that there were other temples which God had honoured by making them his habitation, besides that which Solomon had erected. The body of Christ was such an abode of the Deity. Our blessed Lord “spake of the temple of his body:” for therein “dwelt all the fulness of the Godhead.” The indwelling of the Deity in the human body of the Lord Jesus Christ was a mystery of wonder and love, and upon it the great doctrines of redemption depended. There was, however, another temple which God was pleased to inhabit, namely, the souls of believers. “For thus saith the high and lofty one that inhabiteth eternity, whose name is Holy; I dwell in the high and holy place, with him also that is of a contrite and humble spirit.” And the Apostle says to the Corinthian Christians, “Know ye not that your body is the temple of the Holy Ghost?” God, by his Spirit, vouchsafes to enter into the hearts of his people, and makes them his habitation. In order to their enjoying this unspeakable privilege, it is necessary that they should be made the children of God by adoption, And who were they to whom “he gives power to become the sons of God,” but “those that believe on the name of his Son ?” Man, in his natural state, is not the temple of God. The human soul has become since the fall a desolated mansion, inhabited by unclean lusts and passions. When, however, the Spirit of God graciously visits it, and takes up his abode there, he cleanses it from all iniquity, and gradually restores it to holiness. A man must be brought to feel his state of ruin; he must repent of sin, and turn to God, and trust in the atonement of Christ for pardon, and seek the grace of the Holy Spirit, and do works meet for repentance, before he could be warranted to conclude that he is a temple of God. He trusted that many whom he addressed had experienced this change. If so, let them not be discouraged or desponding if they found the work of grace still imperfect in them. For God, who had begun a good work in them, would in due time perfect it. They were to watch and pray for the more abundant influences of the Holy Spirit, which God had promised to them that ask Him. They were to work out their own salvation with fear and trembling, depending on “God to work in them to will and to do of His good pleasure.” There was one remarkable word in the text which had not yet been noticed - the word “together.” Not only was each believer a temple of the Holy Ghost – “but the whole body of believers were” builded together for an habitation of God through the Spirit.” It was by union with Christ that they were to be united to each other, and “grow together into an holy temple in the Lord.” And this reminded them of the necessity of such houses of prayer us that In which they were then assembled. For if Christians were to be “builded together,” they must worship together. As secret prayer was indispensible to the maintenance of the life of God in the soul of each individual, so social and public prayer was necessary that God's people might be joined together in the fellowship of the Spirit. It was a delightful sight to behold families and parishes thus “builded together,” by partaking of those religious ordinances which were instituted by the great Head of the Church for the express purpose of edifying His body. He prayed that such a picture might be realized in the new parish of Brompton; that minister and people might be united in bonds of Christian affection ; that rich and poor, young and old, might – so to speak - be cemented by love into one holy temple, in the midst of which God would condescend to dwell; “till they all came in the unity of the faith and of the knowledge of the Son of God, unto a perfect man, to the measure of the stature of the fullness of Christ.”
The collection for the new schools, which was made during the offertory, amounted to £134 7s. 6d.
The new church at Brompton has been built and endowned by means of funds entrusted to the Rev. W. Conway, curate of St. Nicholas, Rochester, and his sister Miss Conway. The site was granted by the Board of Ordnance. Mr. Myers, of London, is the builder of this beautiful edifice, which displays in all its features, the professional ability of Mr. Daukes, the architect. An effectual provision is made for warming the interior by means of a system of hot water pipes. The organ, which in its structure harmonizes with the building, and is a remarkably rich toned instrument, reflects great credit upon the builder of it, Mr. Walker. It was admirably played, on the occasion, by Mr. Gardner, the organist of Highgate, Middlesex.
At two o'clock, the Bishop and a large company (about one hundred in all) consisting of about fifty clergymen, many of the heads of departments, and several of the influential Inhabitants of Brompton, partook at the Sun Hotel, Chatham, of a cold collation, provided at Mr. Conway's expense. The repast being ended, Mr. Conway, who presided, rose and said that he begged to propose a toast which he was sure would be most cordially received by such an assembly as that before him, composed, as it was, of clergymen and members of the Church of England, - the health of her most gracious Majesty, the Queen.
The Rev. Chairman next proposed the health of his Grace the Archbishop of Canterbury, a prelate not more distinguished by his high position in the church, than by the elevation of his Christian character.
The preceding toasts having been duly responded to, Mr. Conway said that it was now his pleasing duty to propose the health of the Lord Bishop of Rochester, and, in doing this, he gladly availed himself of the opportunity to express his thanks to his lordship, for the kindness he had received at his lordship's hands, with reference to the object which had that day been completed. The Bishop had exerted himself with the Ecclesiastical Commissioners to effect the formation of the new district. He had also attended at the Board of Ordnance on the subject of the site; and he had that day kindly come for the purpose of consecrating the church, the erection of which was now brought to a happy termination.
His Lordship, in acknowledging the toast, said that he had at all times much pleasure in visiting this part of his diocese; but on the present occasion he experienced peculiar satisfaction, in coming to take part in the consecration of a new church for the worship of Almighty God. Not only would that church be a most valuable boon to the inhabitants of Brompton; but, owing to the proximity of the garrison, many of the military (some of the heads of whom he saw around him) would have a fresh source of religious consolation open to them. His lordship trusted that the Divine blessing might rest upon the church, and upon those by whom it had been provided. His lordship ended by proposing the health of Mr. and Miss Conway, which was received with every mark of respect.
Lieut. Col. Sir Frederick Smith, R.E., K.H., begged permission to make one or two observations. Allusion had been made by his lordship to the advantages which the new church would afford to the military; and he (Sir F. Smith) as one of the heads of departments, expressed his warm sense of gratitude to Mr. and Miss Conway, on this account. It was true that they had the garrison chapel, and the services of an exemplary chaplain; but there were occasions when they and their families could enjoy the ordinances of religion in the new church, which the military chapel did not afford them. Sir F. Smith then proceeded to speak of the very decided progress which religion was making in the British array. So extensive, indeed, was this progress, that none but these who had the means of detailed investigation could form an idea of it. He was happy to bear his testimony to the religious influence exercised in the garrison of Chatham, by two respected officers who were now present; and he might add the pleasing fact, that the men under his own command were in the habit of beginning each day with devotional reading. The effect of this increase of religious principle in the army was seen in the decrease of punishment; and the same remark applied also to the navy; and since this important result ensued from the extension of religious knowledge, he could not but again express, on the part of the military, his sense of obligation to Mr. and Miss Conway, for conferring on the neighbourhood of the garrison this additional means of spiritual consolation.
Mr. Conway said that he deeply felt the kindness with which his health, and that of his sister, had been proposed by his respected diocesan, and received by the company there present. He was also obliged to Sir Frederick Smith for the kind manner in which he had expressed himself. He, on his own part, was much indebted to several of the officers, for the valuable aid they had lent him. Sir F. Smith, Col. Slade, Captain Ord, and an excellent and valued friend, now on his way to India, whose name would long be affectionately remembered in Chatham, the Hon. Captain Powys, had all materially assisted to further his object. With reference to the means by which his sister and himself had been enabled to build, and to provide for the endowment of the Church, he took that opportunity of stating, that a sum of money had been entrusted to himself and his sister by his aunt, the late Miss Rachel Louisa Reeves, to be applied to charitable objects, and placed under their control; and that they had concurred in thinking that they could not employ it in a locality where it was more needed than that they had selected. He stated this, in order that the credit might be given where the credit was due. It had been his good fortune to be connected with an architect of great ability, and a builder of great integrity; and he had now only to express his fervent hope that the blessing of God might rest upon the minister, by whom the services would be conducted in the church, and to whom the pastoral care of the new parish had been entrusted.
Mr. Dulvey, surgeon, begged leave on his own part, and on the part of the inhabitants of Brompton, to express his grateful acknowledgments to Mr. and Miss Conway for the great and permanent benefit which had been conferred upon the new parish, by the erection of a beautiful church, in which the parishioners would enjoy the blessing of religious ordinances. Nor was his gratitude, and that of his fellow parishioners, due for the church alone; he begged to add his thanks for the minister who had been appointed to it. That clergyman had already shown how desirous he was for the religious welfare of the people, by his assiduous attention to his duties, and by his constant visits among the poor, ever since his appointment to the district. He (Mr. D.) trusted that he might be allowed to propose the health of the Rev. Mr. Cooke, the incumbent of Trinity church, Brompton. The toast was responded to with much cordiality.
His Lordship then rose and retired, and the company separated evidently delighted with the satisfactory manner in which every part of the proceedings had been conducted.
A beautiful lithographic print of the church, executed by Mr. Day, lithographer to Her Majesty, has just been published.
The church is in the late style of early English, bordering upon transition into decorated. The body of the church, which accommodates about 900 persons, is divided into a nave and two side aisles by a series of arches and pillars, supporting a clerestory of good proportions, which externally forms a pleasing feature in the design. The tower, surmounted by a spire, altogether about 130 feet in height, is situated at the north-east angle of the building, and from its lofty situation is visible for a considerable distance. The lower part of the tower is used as the vestry. Two galleries are erected at the west-end between which is the organ. The chancel is lighted by two windows on the south side, of similar design to those in the aisles, and by a triplet with trefoils over each light at the east end. This window has been filled with stained glass by Mr. Foord, of Rochester. A pulpit of elaborate design is placed on the south side of the chancel arch; it is of Caen stone, and forms a pleasing feature in the interior. The communion-table, rail, and parclose are of oak. Kentish rag stone is the material employed in the building, laid irregularly. The dressings and spire are Bath stone, all which was sent from the quarry ready worked.

I believe this may be the lithographic print referred to in the article:


Another early engraving, titled "Trinity Church, Brompton, Kent - (Mr. S.W. Daukes, Architect) 1858"


Both images pre-date 1863 when the clock was added to the tower.

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Offline Leofwine

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Re: Holy Trinity,Old Brompton.
« Reply #29 on: January 12, 2012, 16:06:26 »
The vicarage/parsonage was built to house the Rev. Daniel Cooke (pictured in an earlier post) who had been vicar of Holy Trinity Church from its building in 1848. Before the building of the vicarage he had spent most of his time living at 12 Prospect Row. There is a bricked up gateway in the back garden wall of this property which may possibly be something Rev. Cooke had added to make access to the church easier.

The 1860s Town Planning map clearly shows the position of the parsonage as being south of Holy Trinity School, right next to the road that gave access to the Garrison Hospital. I believe it is the building in the foreground of numanfan's postcard earlier in the thread.



These newspaper articles explain the fate of the vicarage.

Chatham News, 25 Feb 1955 (Page 2)
BROMPTON CHURCH MAY VANISH

The Kent County Council have received Ministry approval to purchase church property at Brompton, including the Holy Trinity Church site and the nearby vicarage, for educational purposes.
This was announced at Medway’s meeting of Gillingham Education Committee by the chairman (Ald. T. W. Bowman) in reply to a question by Cllr. F. E. Young.
The chairman said negotiations were now going on for the purchase of the property at Brompton, where it is planned to set up a special school.
It is not yet known whether the County Council will take over Holy Trinity Church or whether this will be demolished or transferred to another site before they take over the land.
This is still a matter for discussion.


Chatham News, 25 Apr 1958 (Page 3)
Vicarage to share fate of church
FORMER Holy Trinity vicarage at Maxwell Road Brompton, is to share the fate of nearby Holy Trinity Church by being pulled down to make way for a new school, under plans made by Gillingham Education Committee.
Demolition of the church, closed several years ago, is nearing completion and now the committee wants the vicarage to go, too.
A church school, drill hall, cottage and garages in the area have been bought by Kent Education Committee and these are also to be demolished and the land incorporated in the site of the new school.
When the church was closed the population of the area had dwindled as Gillingham Council cleared the older houses in the district.
Now, with the building of new houses and flats people are returning to Brompton, making it necessary for a new primary school to be built there to cater for the increasing number of children.


Chatham News, 25 July 1958
OLD VICARAGE WILL BE PULLED DOWN

BROMPTON vicarage will soon share the fate of nearby Holy Trinity Church by being demolished. Gillingham Education Committee has accepted a tender for the work which will be started “as soon as possible.” Garages in the same area will continue to be used for the present, but they, too, will eventually be pulled down. When that is done the whole area will be grassed over for use as playing fields until a primary school is built there to serve Brompton.
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Offline bromptonboy

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Re: Holy Trinity,Old Brompton.
« Reply #28 on: January 12, 2012, 11:50:19 »
A bit more Holy Trinity detail - Taken from the Building News and Architectural Review of Nov 28 1862.
Brompton, Chatham - A Parsonage House for the incumbent of Holy Trinity church in front of Chatham Lines has been commenced from the designs of Mr A.D.Gough architect, Lancaster Place, London. It is in stock brickwork, relieved with red, yellow, and black bands. The principal ornamental details are in Bath stone. Mr Alfred Stump of Brompton is the contractor at an amount of £1,188 10s.
Two thoughts? Over a thousand pounds cost to build! Some Parsonage. Second, where was this house? Built of Stock bricks, it does not match the materials of what we now refer to as the Holy Trinity Vicarage.

Offline Leofwine

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Re: Holy Trinity,Old Brompton.
« Reply #27 on: November 21, 2011, 18:50:42 »
Chatham News, Friday 24 Dec 1943 (Page 6)


BROMPTON CHURCH FIRE
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Organ Destroyed and Other Damage
The organ was totally destroyed, the roof above it burnt through, the sanctuary badly charred, and the walls of the whole building badly blackened by smoke as the result of an outbreak of fire at Holy Trinity Church, Brompton on Saturday Evening. The fire is believed to have originated from the heating system of the church.
The discovery was made round about 9.15 p.m. Two girls – the Misses Joan and Freda Goodwin, of Trinity Close, were on their way to a dance with some friends when they saw flames coming from the roof. With commendable presence of mind they immediately contacted Gillingham fire Brigade, the Rev. R. G. Miller, curate-in-charge of Brompton, who lives at Garden-street, and summoned other assistance.
Before the arrival of the Brigade, however, a soldier at the request of Mr. Miller, broke a window and so gained access to the church, and by means of a stirrup pump and buckets of water an attack was made on the flames.
CROSS REMOVED
Mr. Miller himself groped his way through the thick blanket of smoke to the sanctuary, where he removed to a safe place the cross and candlesticks and other altar ornament, as well as the Mother’s Union banner.
Mrs. Goodwin. The mother of Joan and Freda, tried to get in to remove the carpets.
The Army authorities also gave commendable assistance, sending their own fire-fighting apparatus and a squad of men from Brompton Barracks.
The fire, however, obtained a fairly strong hold on the building and it was not until about 12.30 p.m. that the flames were finally extinguished.
As the church was rendered unsuitable for use, the Services on Sunday – as they will be at Christmastide – were held in the Conway Hall.
At the afternoon service the Archdeacon of Rochester (the Ven. W. M. Browne) gave an encouraging address, pointing out that although Holy Trinity Church had had its ups and downs, they must remain steadfast and put their trust in the Lord.
The Lord Bishop of Rochester (Dr. C. M. Chavasse) is to preach there on Sunday morning.
The organ, which was insured, was in part a memorial of the last war for parents and relatives of men in the parish who made the supreme sacrifice paid for the various organ pipes and a commemorative tablet giving the names of the fallen, was erected on the adjoining wall.
It is understood that the church has been cleaned up as best it can be for the time being, in order that marriages may continue to be solemnised there.
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Offline Leofwine

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Re: Holy Trinity,Old Brompton.
« Reply #26 on: November 21, 2011, 17:56:49 »
Holy Trinity Church Brompton c1855-60

Photograph reproduced by permission of the Royal Engineers Museum www.re-museum.co.uk
Photograph of Holy Trinity parish church, Military Road (later Maxwell Road), Old Brompton, looking west from the inner lines. This photo shows the building as it was first built, before the addition of the clock and vicarage in the 1860s.

Rev. Daniel Cooke, Vicar of Holy Trinity, Brompton 1848-1902

Rev. Daniel Cooke was vicar of Holy Trinity Church from its opening in 1848 until 1902 when he retired. He died soon afterwards. He seems to have been a popular and influential character in late 19th century Brompton.
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Offline Leofwine

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Re: Holy Trinity,Old Brompton.
« Reply #25 on: November 21, 2011, 17:38:42 »
Chatham News, 18 June 1920 (Page 2)

HOLY TRINITY CHURCH, BROMPTON
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RESTORATION FUND APPEAL.
WE, the undersigned, make an urgent appeal to all Churchpeople, friends, and sympathisers of the above Church in the local towns, and in the Rochester Diocese generally, for funds towards the Restoration of the Church. The Architect of the Rochester Diocesan Board has made a thorough survey of the Church and Conway Hall, and estimates that the sum of £2,500 will be required to put everything in thorough repair. For the last thirteen years the Church and Parish have been entirely neglected in every sense of the term. The state of affairs at the Church has been well known to the public for a long time past, and needs no further comment.
Happily, this dark page in the history of the Church is past. A new era has set in, and brighter days are coming. A new Vicar (the Rev. J. D. Jones, M.A.) has been appointed who will shortly be inducted and working amongst us. We feel sure, under his leadership, the re-construction of the Church, and all Church work in the parish will rapidly go forward. With this end in view, we confidently appeal to our many friends for a generous response, so that we may be able to make a start on our most pressing requirements, viz., Lighting, Windows, Conway Hall, etc. A banking account has been opened at the Capital and Counties Branch of Lloyds Bank, High-street, Chatham, where donations can be sent. Please make cheques payable to to Holy Trinity, C.R. Funds, or to the Rev. J. D. Jones, M.A., Vicar-Elect, 45, Rochester Street, Chatham; P. W. Morehen, 6, High-street, Brompton, and A. W. Friend, 36, High-street, Brompton, Churchwardens, Joint Hon. Treasurers of the Fund.
All donations will be promptly acknowledged.


The phrase The state of affairs at the Church has been well known to the public for a long time past, and needs no further comment. might need some explaining at this point, long beyond the memory of the events concerned. Rev. H. J. Martin became vicar of the church in about 1903 and seems to have fallen out with the Diocesan authorities over funding for the church. A long stream of very public letters went back and forth between the Rev. Martin and the Diocesan offices, published almost weekly in the local press from Sept 1903 until April 1919. This continued lack of funding from the Bishop, perhaps aggravated by Rev. Martin's very public feud, led to Rev Martin gradually refusing to open the church and carry out most of his duties. This made him quite unpopular with many of the locals. In mid 1919 things came to a head in a very public scandal. Rev. Martin was accused, and found guilty of, assaulting one of his housemaids with a 'forceful kiss on the neck'!  The case went to court and he was removed from his post, the case being well reported in the local press.
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torpointblue

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Re: Holy Trinity,Old Brompton.
« Reply #24 on: October 14, 2011, 16:22:22 »
I was born in the Military Families hospital  in Brompton in August 1950, and was christened by the Rev Gummer  in Holy Trinity

Offline Leofwine

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Re: Holy Trinity,Old Brompton.
« Reply #23 on: May 29, 2011, 17:39:56 »
Great pic numanfan, I've not seen that one before. I can't help with the dating other than to say from buildings that are and aren't there it must be between 1889 and 1926. I know another postcard in that series showing Brompton High Street was taken in 1902, so I would guess that is around the same date.

It's great to see the old vicarage in the foreground, you don't often see pictures of that.
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