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Author Topic: Holy Trinity,Old Brompton.  (Read 26850 times)

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merc

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Re: Holy Trinity,Old Brompton.
« Reply #7 on: February 12, 2010, 13:56:54 »

Then and now.

merc

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Re: Holy Trinity,Old Brompton.
« Reply #6 on: January 09, 2010, 00:07:00 »
I've recently discovered an almost identical black and white print of the above picture, on Ebay, and the details for that one are:

"Caption below picture: 'Trinity Church, Brompton, Kent - (Mr. S.W. Daukes, Architect), 1858"


merc

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Re: Holy Trinity,Old Brompton.
« Reply #5 on: November 30, 2009, 12:52:01 »
Colin Haggart showed me this lovely picture, which is hanging in St Mark's, Gillingham.



On the back is written:

 This Print, painted but undated, is of Holy Trinity Church, Brompton. Brompton is now part of the parish of St. Mark's, Gillingham.

Offline bromptonboy

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Re: Holy Trinity,Old Brompton.
« Reply #4 on: November 13, 2009, 12:29:33 »
Some more Holy Trinity Church snippets.

The Church and attached School were built on land given over by the Board of Ordnance.
In the nw corner of the site next to the Cannon Pub a small Drill Hall was built for the local Volunteer Artillery hence the pub name. The red-brick buildings on the corner of Garden Street and Mansion Row were the quarters for the unit permanant staff.
The Vicarage was a handsome victorian detached house behind the Church close to the rear garden walls of Prospect Row.
In later years the house was used as a store by the Trinity School finally being demolished in the 1960's.
The Captain Hammond mentioned elsewhere was an officer of the Rifle Brigade and a leading light in the creation of the Army Scripture Union while he was in Chatham.
The Church wasn't the only Brompton institution to transfer to Twydall. After WW2 Gillingham Council carried out a 'slum-clearance' programme in Brompton and moved large numbers of the Old Brompton community into the new Twydal Estate. As we know the Trinity Church went with them, but so did the Dew Drop Pub and the Royal Engineer Pub in an attempt to keep the Brompton community spirit.

merc

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Re: Holy Trinity,Old Brompton.
« Reply #3 on: June 11, 2009, 11:41:26 »
I remember a little bell tower on the Maxwell Road side of the school that had an inscription declaring that the school extension had been built to celebrate the 'peace of the late war'. The date suggested it was the Crimean War, When the school was converted into apartments the tower and its inscription disappeared!
There is a memorial from the school in the Garrison Chuch,but i can't remember what it was exactly o:) :-[
So the inscription could be just up the road ???

Offline bromptonboy

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Re: Holy Trinity,Old Brompton.
« Reply #2 on: June 11, 2009, 09:21:06 »
I went to the Brompton School from 1962 and what a lovely place it was. The Church had by then been demolished and the site turned into our playing field. Mum and Dad used to say what a beautiful building it was. Half of our playing field had been the Churchyard that had also contained the Brompton War Memorial that was removed to the grass bank above the Dock Road roundabout. This is called Swan Gardens after the ancient Swan Public House that once stood at the bottom of Wood Street.

I remember a little bell tower on the Maxwell Road side of the school that had an inscription declaring that the school extension had been built to celebra
te the 'peace of the late war'. The date suggested it was the Crimean War, When the school was converted into apartments the tower and its inscription disappeared!

A further bit of trivia! John Selwyn Gummer who went on to become a cabinet minister in Maggie Thatchers government lived at the Church Vicarage as his father was for a time the vicar there.


merc

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Holy Trinity,Old Brompton.
« Reply #1 on: June 10, 2009, 23:44:15 »
Here's a church in Brompton that i've always wondered about.
It's long been demolished,but i've seen it in several old photo's and on maps.
It had a large spire that stuck out from behind the fortifications of the Chatham Lines which must have made a good spectacle.


From 1830 Old Brompton had a resident priest but no Church for services,The Angicans had to go either to Chatham or Gillingham Churches.
However,there was a Wesleyan Chapel and a Roman Catholic Church in Brompton though. The new parish was established in 1848,land had been purchased from the Military authorities and a new church was built of Kentish ragstone to the design of Sir Gilbert Scot,RA. It seated over 1,000 people and the cost of over 12,000,was met entirely by Canon William Conway,Vicar of St. Margaret's,Rochester,and his sister. The Church was consecrated on 20th December 1848 by the Bishop of Rochester.

School rooms were added by 1851 and extended in 1856 to commemorate the end of the Crimean war and the death of Captain Hammond. In 1862 a clock was installed in the tower,paid for by public subscription to commemorate Prince Albert,Prince Consort. In 1889 a parish hall was built in memory of Canon Conway and named after him. The Rev. Daniel Cooke,who had had been priest at the church since the begining,retired after 54 years,he died not long after. The church began to run into all kinds of trouble,the tower was said to be unsafe and the church finances were short. The new vicar who replaced Rev Cooke could not improve things,so he left. The Rev. H.J. Martin took his place and came with his wife and eight children from St Gerrans,Portscathro,Cornwall.

In 1907 the school was providing meals for poor children. Rev Martin became entangled in a domestic scandal which was well publicised by the local press and the church had to close for 18 months. Eventually he had to appear before an Ecclesiastical Consistory Court and was removed from office.

The Church reopened in April 1920 when the 90 year old curate faced a congregation of only four people,including a newspaper reporter who's persistence had forced the service to take place. The Rev J.D. Jones became the new vicar,who had come from being a curate at Gillingham. He failed to revitalise the parish with a building that was too large for the population,and at a time that interest in religion was in decline.

Holy Trinity finally closed in 1950 and later pulled down. The parish was absorbed into that of St Marks,Gillingham. However,it's name was transferred to a new church near Twydall Green.

A School remained on the site for a number of years afterwards, in fact i think one of my friends went there. This has since closed, and after a period of dereliction, and a fire, the site is now appartments.

 

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