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Author Topic: Betteshanger Colliery  (Read 31918 times)

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Offline GP

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Re: Betteshanger Colliery
« Reply #31 on: September 13, 2012, 17:37:01 »
For those interested in Coal Mining history, I suggest a visit to the Big Pit Museum, Wales.

www.museumwales.ac.uk/en/bigpit

An actual Mine has been preserved near enough as a working pit. Visitors have to wear a miners helmet with battery light, and go down in a lift .

Must say I was quite apprehensive, but glad I went and saw the working  conditions.

I know Maggie closed all the pits, but I cannot see how anyone now would work in such conditions

IanDB

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Re: Betteshanger Colliery
« Reply #30 on: September 13, 2012, 17:03:28 »
The Under Manager's office at the pit bottom of Betteshanger Colliery. Under Manager Bill Breeze at his desk.


IanDB

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Re: Betteshanger Colliery
« Reply #29 on: September 13, 2012, 16:58:14 »
Take your point, though my intention was to conduct an underground tour as it were.....perhaps better had I left out references to individual pits. Apart from the first two pictures which contain references to individual mines the rest are illustrative of any coal mine but do relate to the Kent pits. Without help I would be hard pushed to identify the other pictures to individual pits. Sorry.

Offline kyn

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Re: Betteshanger Colliery
« Reply #28 on: September 13, 2012, 16:51:19 »
Sorry to be a pain but can the photos be added to the threads for each coal mine.  Threads like this get confusing and hard for people to search.  Thank you.

IanDB

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Re: Betteshanger Colliery
« Reply #27 on: September 13, 2012, 16:09:06 »
The secret of the coal face of course is to keep it advancing. As the props and girders are moved forward the roof is allowed to collapse behind therefore taking off the weight. Didn't always work of course, Mother Nature being a fickle lady, and roof collapses in the working area happened for a variety of reasons.

Offline JohnWalker

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Re: Betteshanger Colliery
« Reply #26 on: September 13, 2012, 15:51:14 »
Amazing photos - best I've seen of a coalface.  I can't believe that pit props are strong enough to support the incredible weight above them - frightening.

JohnWalker

IanDB

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Re: Betteshanger Colliery
« Reply #25 on: September 13, 2012, 15:07:17 »
All the pictures posted here were originally contained within the picture gallery of the "Coalfield Heritage Initiative Kent" website.
Thanks to "Overman" for his agreement in showing them on the forum. I stand to be corrected on my description of any of the photographs as I'm working from memory and have been out of the mining industry for nearly 40 years now  :)

The relative orderliness of the Under manager's pit bottom office at Betteshanger Colliery with Bill Breeze at his desk.


The main pit bottom roadways leading to the East and South East districts within Chislet Colliery.


Conditions further into the pit take on a harsher reality. A good example of how the floor of the tunnel heaves upwards over time as pressure from the strata above pushes down on the tunnel roof supports. A task known as "dinting" carried out at these locations to maintain the height of the roadway by levelling the floor again.


Operating an Eimco electric bucket loader either on development of new roadways, or in a heading in front of an advancing coal face.


Up to the "main gate" end of a coal face. The loading end of the face conveyor seen in the centre left of the picture.


Anderton Shearer coal cutter on a face not yet equipped with hydraulic chock roof supports, but still on props and girders which are manually advanced by men on the face after each pass by the coal cutter. 



Anderton Shearer coal cutting machine in operation on a coal face.


After a pass by the coal cutter the face conveyor on the right of the picture is pushed up to the coal, and the roof supports on the left are also drawn in towards the conveyor to await the next pass by the cutting machine.


I'm not 100% sure of the task in hand here, but the roof supports on trams (left of centre) would suggest salvage from a worked out coal face. I stand to be corrected on this one.


Hope that all makes a bit of sense to those who couldn't imagine the workings of a coal mine, and doesn't sound condescending to those who have worked there or have knowledge of the complexities of winning coal.

Adrianmidwales

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Re: Betteshanger Colliery
« Reply #24 on: September 03, 2012, 17:57:22 »
Another Couple


Offline Lutonman

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Re: Betteshanger Colliery
« Reply #23 on: September 02, 2012, 20:57:13 »
In my last year at school in 1969, I had an organised visit to go down the mine. What an experience it was, it left me with nothing but admiration for those hard working fellows, something I shall never forget.

Offline Sentinel S4

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Re: Betteshanger Colliery
« Reply #22 on: September 02, 2012, 19:15:45 »
Do you have any more pics? Those are great.

S4.
A day without learning something is a day lost and my brain is hungry. Feed me please.

Offline kyn

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Re: Betteshanger Colliery
« Reply #21 on: September 02, 2012, 18:19:12 »
What lovely pictures, thank you for sharing them with us!

Adrianmidwales

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Re: Betteshanger Colliery
« Reply #20 on: September 02, 2012, 17:06:35 »
My Grandad spent most of his working life at Betteshanger




IanDB

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Re: Betteshanger Colliery
« Reply #19 on: August 24, 2012, 09:23:07 »
Retained my authorisation to operate an Eimco bucket loader after transfer from Chislet to Betteshanger colliery.


Offline PaddyX21

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Re: Betteshanger Colliery
« Reply #18 on: July 12, 2012, 09:16:16 »
My grandfather worked at Betteshanger colliery after the war, and remains in Deal now.
He moved down here from Sheffield after leaving the Navy.

I must get him to relate some stories for me
Never be afraid to stand out from the crowd!

Offline smiler

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Re: Betteshanger Colliery
« Reply #17 on: March 13, 2012, 08:41:36 »


From Kent a chronicle of the century by Bob Ogley.

 

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