News: “Over the graves of the Druids and under the wreck of Rome,
Rudely but surely they bedded the plinth of the days to come.
Behind the feet of the Legions and before the Norseman’s ire
Rudely but greatly begat they the framing of State and Shire
Rudely but deeply they laboured, and their labour stand till now.
If we trace on ancient headlands the twist of their eight-ox plough.”

-Rudyard Kipling
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Author Topic: Short Brothers of Rochester  (Read 105107 times)

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Offline kyn

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Re: Short Brothers of Rochester
« Reply #82 on: July 21, 2013, 21:34:08 »
More recent images of the factory section.  It has been a while since I was in here, and usually access was a lot easier, but I am glad to say not much damage has occurred!

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Offline HERB COLLECTOR

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Re: Short Brothers of Rochester
« Reply #81 on: April 26, 2013, 21:59:22 »
The earliest reference I can find for float-planes is Flight March 13 1931. (Fairey lllf float-planes).
Float-planes were known as hydroplanes or similar 1912-1914, and seaplanes 1914 to at least the mid 1920's, both in the USA and Europe.
Flying-boats were called flying-boats from 1912 onwards, (USA and Europe).

For the uninitiated.
A flying-boat is an aeroplane in which the fuselage is designed to provide buoyancy on water.
A float-plane has two or three floats to provide buoyancy.



Offline peterchall

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Re: Short Brothers of Rochester
« Reply #80 on: April 25, 2013, 22:09:50 »
And Shorts seaplanes were actually launched on a river, so should we call them riverplanes? Why not call them all waterplanes? After all, the Valetta was converted to a 'landplane' in November 1931!
It's no use getting old if you don't get artful

chasg

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Re: Short Brothers of Rochester
« Reply #79 on: April 25, 2013, 22:03:34 »
Ditto. But whereas the Concise Oxford Dictionary didn't even recognise 'floatplane' (or variations thereof) back in the '70s, now it's simply defined as "a seaplane". A Google image search on "Short seaplane" throws up quite a few, too...

Sirenetta

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Re: Short Brothers of Rochester
« Reply #78 on: April 25, 2013, 17:50:10 »
Funny how the language has changed.  I never heard of float-planes in England as I grew up.  Thought it was a US term.  So in my pedant's book there were sea planes and flying boats.  But then I'm also a COB!

Offline peterchall

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Re: Short Brothers of Rochester
« Reply #77 on: April 24, 2013, 20:14:15 »
I forgot that one.

But for the COB's (Cussed Old B****s), otherwise known as pedants, among us, flying-boats and float-planes are both sea-planes, just as the commonly used term 'aircraft' for aeroplane actually includes aeroplanes, gliders, helicopters, airships and balloons.
It's no use getting old if you don't get artful

chasg

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Re: Short Brothers of Rochester
« Reply #76 on: April 24, 2013, 18:21:13 »
And Mayo, of the Maia/Mayo composite, was a four-engine seaplane.

Offline peterchall

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Re: Short Brothers of Rochester
« Reply #75 on: April 24, 2013, 17:24:22 »
They built a  number of different designs of single engined float-plane about and during WW1. There was also the Valetta - a 3-engined float-plane built in 1930. I think it was their last floatplane.
It's no use getting old if you don't get artful

Sirenetta

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Re: Short Brothers of Rochester
« Reply #74 on: April 24, 2013, 16:49:56 »
Wonderful to see at the start of this thread, the old newsreel clips of the Short Flying Boat (they didn't build sea planes; they are quite a different animal - no hull in the water!).  My favourite memory, however, is of the mother and daughter piggyback pairing of aircraft moored just above Rochester bridge.

Offline kyn

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Re: Short Brothers of Rochester
« Reply #73 on: March 30, 2013, 19:37:43 »
:(  That's not good!  That is the risk of going to these places though.  There is so much to see here you would need numerous trips to cover everything!

Offline cliveh

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Re: Short Brothers of Rochester
« Reply #72 on: March 30, 2013, 19:36:31 »
Yes it really is!  Did you notice the wartime grafitti?
Yes, I saw some kyn, but doubtless I missed loads trying to watch where I was treading. One guy tripped over a metal box and smashed his £1000 camera to bits!

cliveh

Offline kyn

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Re: Short Brothers of Rochester
« Reply #71 on: March 30, 2013, 19:08:01 »
Yes it really is!  Did you notice the wartime grafitti?

Offline cliveh

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Re: Short Brothers of Rochester
« Reply #70 on: March 30, 2013, 18:44:21 »
A few photos from my visit today - what a fantastic place!

cliveh

Offline peterchall

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Re: Short Brothers of Rochester
« Reply #69 on: September 07, 2012, 17:39:23 »
Thanks for that. :)

The location is identifiable on today's Google Earth. It confirms at least 4 moorings and I think there were others further towards the bridge, near where Wingets was.
It's no use getting old if you don't get artful

jammy36

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Re: Short Brothers of Rochester
« Reply #68 on: September 07, 2012, 14:06:43 »
Four Short's Sea Planes moored up on the Medway (Town Reach) in c 1946

 

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