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Author Topic: Short Brothers of Rochester  (Read 111270 times)

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Offline kyn

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Re: Short Brothers of Rochester
« Reply #82 on: July 21, 2013, 21:34:08 »
More recent images of the factory section.  It has been a while since I was in here, and usually access was a lot easier, but I am glad to say not much damage has occurred!

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Offline HERB COLLECTOR

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Re: Short Brothers of Rochester
« Reply #81 on: April 26, 2013, 21:59:22 »
The earliest reference I can find for float-planes is Flight March 13 1931. (Fairey lllf float-planes).
Float-planes were known as hydroplanes or similar 1912-1914, and seaplanes 1914 to at least the mid 1920's, both in the USA and Europe.
Flying-boats were called flying-boats from 1912 onwards, (USA and Europe).

For the uninitiated.
A flying-boat is an aeroplane in which the fuselage is designed to provide buoyancy on water.
A float-plane has two or three floats to provide buoyancy.



Offline peterchall

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Re: Short Brothers of Rochester
« Reply #80 on: April 25, 2013, 22:09:50 »
And Shorts seaplanes were actually launched on a river, so should we call them riverplanes? Why not call them all waterplanes? After all, the Valetta was converted to a 'landplane' in November 1931!
It's no use getting old if you don't get artful

chasg

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Re: Short Brothers of Rochester
« Reply #79 on: April 25, 2013, 22:03:34 »
Ditto. But whereas the Concise Oxford Dictionary didn't even recognise 'floatplane' (or variations thereof) back in the '70s, now it's simply defined as "a seaplane". A Google image search on "Short seaplane" throws up quite a few, too...

Sirenetta

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Re: Short Brothers of Rochester
« Reply #78 on: April 25, 2013, 17:50:10 »
Funny how the language has changed.  I never heard of float-planes in England as I grew up.  Thought it was a US term.  So in my pedant's book there were sea planes and flying boats.  But then I'm also a COB!

Offline peterchall

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Re: Short Brothers of Rochester
« Reply #77 on: April 24, 2013, 20:14:15 »
I forgot that one.

But for the COB's (Cussed Old B****s), otherwise known as pedants, among us, flying-boats and float-planes are both sea-planes, just as the commonly used term 'aircraft' for aeroplane actually includes aeroplanes, gliders, helicopters, airships and balloons.
It's no use getting old if you don't get artful

chasg

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Re: Short Brothers of Rochester
« Reply #76 on: April 24, 2013, 18:21:13 »
And Mayo, of the Maia/Mayo composite, was a four-engine seaplane.

Offline peterchall

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Re: Short Brothers of Rochester
« Reply #75 on: April 24, 2013, 17:24:22 »
They built a  number of different designs of single engined float-plane about and during WW1. There was also the Valetta - a 3-engined float-plane built in 1930. I think it was their last floatplane.
It's no use getting old if you don't get artful

Sirenetta

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Re: Short Brothers of Rochester
« Reply #74 on: April 24, 2013, 16:49:56 »
Wonderful to see at the start of this thread, the old newsreel clips of the Short Flying Boat (they didn't build sea planes; they are quite a different animal - no hull in the water!).  My favourite memory, however, is of the mother and daughter piggyback pairing of aircraft moored just above Rochester bridge.

Offline kyn

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Re: Short Brothers of Rochester
« Reply #73 on: March 30, 2013, 19:37:43 »
:(  That's not good!  That is the risk of going to these places though.  There is so much to see here you would need numerous trips to cover everything!

Offline cliveh

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Re: Short Brothers of Rochester
« Reply #72 on: March 30, 2013, 19:36:31 »
Yes it really is!  Did you notice the wartime grafitti?
Yes, I saw some kyn, but doubtless I missed loads trying to watch where I was treading. One guy tripped over a metal box and smashed his 1000 camera to bits!

cliveh

Offline kyn

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Re: Short Brothers of Rochester
« Reply #71 on: March 30, 2013, 19:08:01 »
Yes it really is!  Did you notice the wartime grafitti?

Offline cliveh

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Re: Short Brothers of Rochester
« Reply #70 on: March 30, 2013, 18:44:21 »
A few photos from my visit today - what a fantastic place!

cliveh

Offline peterchall

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Re: Short Brothers of Rochester
« Reply #69 on: September 07, 2012, 17:39:23 »
Thanks for that. :)

The location is identifiable on today's Google Earth. It confirms at least 4 moorings and I think there were others further towards the bridge, near where Wingets was.
It's no use getting old if you don't get artful

jammy36

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Re: Short Brothers of Rochester
« Reply #68 on: September 07, 2012, 14:06:43 »
Four Short's Sea Planes moored up on the Medway (Town Reach) in c 1946

 

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