News: “Over the graves of the Druids and under the wreck of Rome,
Rudely but surely they bedded the plinth of the days to come.
Behind the feet of the Legions and before the Norseman’s ire
Rudely but greatly begat they the framing of State and Shire
Rudely but deeply they laboured, and their labour stand till now.
If we trace on ancient headlands the twist of their eight-ox plough.”

-Rudyard Kipling
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Author Topic: Bomb damage to Wesley Hall, Dover. Then & Now.  (Read 4034 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline unfairytale

  • Established Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1311
  • Appreciation 33
Re: Bomb damage to Wesley Hall, Dover. Then & Now.
« Reply #4 on: December 01, 2009, 19:44:49 »
I've just been reading an article by Harvey Klemmer, a reporter who wrote for the National Geographic Magazine. He was reporting from Dover in the early part of the Second World War when he wrote this:

 "....One Wesleyan church has been a victim of two wars. Beside a gaping hole in the wall is a tablet bearing the following inscription: "Built 1910. Bombed 1917. Rebuilt 1920." I suppose there will be additional entries on the tablet after the present war.
When you've got your back to wall, there's only one thing to do and that's to turn around and fight. (John Major)
http://www.flickr.com/photos/unfairytale/sets/

Offline unfairytale

  • Established Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1311
  • Appreciation 33
Re: Bomb damage to Wesley Hall, Dover. Then & Now.
« Reply #3 on: August 06, 2009, 19:56:14 »


Here's a picture of the Wesley Methodist Church taken before it's first encounter with the enemy when a German aircraft dropped a 200lb bomb completely destroying the roof, remarkably the inside was left virtually unscathed with the wooden seats still standing in straight rows.

 In October 1987 the Church was damaged yet again this time by 'The great storm' losing it's ornamental cross from the roof and damaging the gable.
When you've got your back to wall, there's only one thing to do and that's to turn around and fight. (John Major)
http://www.flickr.com/photos/unfairytale/sets/

Offline Paul

  • Established Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1481
  • Appreciation 64
  • Batpigs'n'Boobies.. ;)
Re: Bomb damage to Wesley Hall, Dover. Then & Now.
« Reply #2 on: August 06, 2009, 13:57:51 »
Nice one :)

That new stone has worn baddly ???
Maybe it's big horse I'm a Londoner. :{

Offline Islesy

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 703
  • Appreciation 43
    • National Three Peaks Challenge 2012, raising funds for Help for Heroes
Bomb damage to Wesley Hall, Dover. Then & Now.
« Reply #1 on: August 06, 2009, 13:53:00 »


The picture on the left was sourced from the Hulton Archive for a Then & Now feature.
The original Picture Post caption reads:
July 1944: A corner of a church in Dover, damaged by a flying bomb. The sign on the wall reads that the church was also bombed during World War I.
Original Publication: Picture Post - 1734 - Dover Watches For The P Planes - pub. 1944
(Photo by Haywood Magee/Picture Post/Getty Images)

Built in 1910, the Wesleyan Chapel on St Martin's Hill (Folkestone Road) was bombed in 1917 and rebuilt in 1920. It was later bombed again in 1941 and rebuilt again in 1949 (certainly kept the Stone Mason in work!!)
"The Wesleyans, after improving their two large chapels in Snargate Street and Buckland, next took steps to provide another chapel on a more central site to meet the convenience of modern Dover, which straggles a long way up two valleys. They secured the site at the point where the two valleys diverge at the foot of St. Martin's Hill, part of the site of the old Dover Priory. There they built the handsome Wesley Hall for services and Sunday Schools, which was opened in November, 1910. The Wesley Hall, which cost £3,000 to build, had the misfortune, on September 22nd, 1917, to be destroyed in a German air raid. After the war it was re-built, and re-opened on March 3rd, 1920. The Wesleyans also acquired the adjoining property, with the intention, later on, of building a large central Wesleyan Church. As far back as 1880 the leading Dover Wesleyans set their minds on this locality, which had attracted religious leaders in Dover in 1131, when they were looking for a new site for the Dover Priory. (J.B.J.)
Three Peaks Challenge 2012 - raising funds for Help for Heroes
www.bmycharity.com/Islesy

 

BloQcs design by Bloc
SMF 2.0.11 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines