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Author Topic: Blue Town  (Read 36340 times)

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Offline HERB COLLECTOR

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Re: Blue Town
« Reply #38 on: March 06, 2015, 14:52:58 »
Link to some more old photos, and some modern, mainly of Blue Town but also of Sheerness and the docks.
http://www.pbase.com/sheppeylad/blue_town__sheerness&page=all

Link to aerial photo of Sheerness Dockyard and Blue Town taken in 1951. To zoom in on the photo you will need to register but its free.
http://www.britainfromabove.org.uk/eaw037832?search=sheerness&ref=4
Don't Let the Devil Ride Chris and Abby

Offline HERB COLLECTOR

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Re: Blue Town
« Reply #37 on: February 02, 2015, 23:10:18 »
Proposal to demolish Blue Town to allow extension of Sheerness Dockyard. 1816.

One of John Rennies proposals for Sheerness Dockyard was for the Navy Board to purchase Blue Town and demolish the houses, the area then being incorporated into the dockyard expansion.
An Act of Parliament was obtained for this in 1816.
By 1819 no action had been taken and the Blue Town inhabitants petitioned for a decision. At the same time the Navy Board felt that the land upon which Blue Town stood would not now be needed and suggestions were made that the act be repealed. Despite this an agent was appointed in 1820 to look into the purchase. The agent noted that over 500 houses were involved with many of the owners having an inflated idea of their property's value.
A bill was then drawn up in May 1821 to purchase the whole of Blue Town, but this was held in abeyance pending instructions to proceed from the Navy Board. Further petitions were sent by the Blue Town house owners demanding a decision. Possibly because of the high costs estimated by the agent, the act of 1816 and the proposed bill were repealed.

Part of Blue Town was demolished to allow the dockyard to expand. Houses had been allowed to be built on government land on the north side of Blue Town High Street on the understanding that the occupants give up possession when the land was required. Charles Dickens once lived in one of them. These were demolished by the end of 1818.
On the west side of West Street, a strip of land with private housing was purchased. The demolition of the houses on the north and west side of the town thus allowing the dockyard wall to be built.
Don't Let the Devil Ride Chris and Abby

John38

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Re: Blue Town
« Reply #36 on: April 23, 2014, 13:31:25 »
Thanks Herb Collector, I had seen them before, but sometime ago, and so I enjoyed the revisit.

I knew the Bidgood's (Butchers) ... Colin B was about my age

Offline HERB COLLECTOR

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Re: Blue Town
« Reply #35 on: April 22, 2014, 23:10:05 »
A link to some photos of Bluetown from Sue Bidgood.
http://www.pbase.com/luckytrev/suebidgood
Enjoy.
Don't Let the Devil Ride Chris and Abby

John38

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Re: Blue Town
« Reply #34 on: April 17, 2014, 23:41:00 »
Thank you Kyn and grandarog - most considerate of you both.

Offline grandarog

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Re: Blue Town
« Reply #33 on: April 17, 2014, 22:35:31 »
Google Map.

Offline kyn

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Re: Blue Town
« Reply #32 on: April 17, 2014, 21:15:08 »

Offline kyn

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Re: Blue Town
« Reply #31 on: April 17, 2014, 20:58:41 »
I would post a clear one for you but not sure I have time as have a busy weekend ahead.  If I get time later I will find one for you.

John38

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Re: Blue Town
« Reply #30 on: April 17, 2014, 20:57:36 »
I know that there are a number of maps of Blue Town posted on here, but my eyesight is so tatty that I can't read the street names. I need the prompt as my memory is worse than my eyesight.

Is there anyway I can get one of the maps 'blown-up' so that I can read it.

I've placed this on a General topic rather than PM Kyn who is busy enough already.

John38

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Re: Blue Town
« Reply #29 on: April 05, 2014, 15:21:09 »
As I was a boy brought up in Blue Town, this (just found) thread is really magical.

It is interesting that 'Jacobs Bank' is shown on the map - and referred to as Mussel bank by CDP. There were a family of Jacobs that lived in Charles Street next to the back entrance of Bigwood the Butcher. The Jacobs pushed their barrow around Sheerness selling 'Cockles (by the pint) and Mussels.' As kids we made a few bob from selling Mussels (from under the Pier) to Mr Jacobs.

The Police Station was directly on the seaward side of St Paul's Church, and although the top picture, kindly posted by Conan, looks like the police station it seems in the wrong setting: It fronted directly onto the pavement with no forecourt. It could be that the two high walls in the foreground are not the boundary to a forecourt but belong to King's St (?) and the camera has foreshortened the view.

I hadn't realised that 'School Lane' had formerly been 'Bull Lane,' but there wasn't a slaughter house there when I lived in our one up/ one down wooden house in School Lane. In the summer months, however, some side doors (looked like garage doors) were opened at the top of the Lane where it meets Charles St. and a few men sat in the Lane, on chairs, plucking poultry. Mr Bigwood slaughtered pigs at the back of his shop - the front of the shop was in the High Street and the pig lorry delivered the squealing pigs through the back entrance in Charles Street.

When I asked my mum why the pigs squealed so loudly, she replied in a mater-of-fact sort of way, "Oh they can smell death, it's the blood of their relatives." It seemed such a normal reply in those days... these days it would seem a very strange way to talk to a little boy  :)

At the end of Charles Street they converted the buildings into 'Barratts' Crisp Factory. On hot days the girls opened the hatch on the East Lane side and we would watch them frying off the crisps. They stood in rows at the same sort of friers' you see in a Fish and Chip shop.

Offline busyglen

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Re: Blue Town
« Reply #28 on: July 08, 2013, 16:32:06 »
Thanks for the 1914 Map Kyn, I was delighted to see that as it also shows the Naval Recreation Ground.  I notice that they also show a Naval Slaughter House nearby which I had never heard of.  I guess it must have disappeared years later before we moved there.  Possibly used for meat for the Navy ships.

I also noted that the Fleet meandered across the land, presumably towards the moat.  I wonder when that was filled in?
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Offline CDP

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Re: Blue Town
« Reply #27 on: July 07, 2013, 20:43:58 »
 In 1940 ish we always referred to Jacobs Bank as the Mussel Bank, being hundreds of mussels on this bank. We were never brave enough to eat them !!!
The solution to every problem is a.) time , or  b.) another problem.

Offline kyn

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Re: Blue Town
« Reply #26 on: July 07, 2013, 19:35:40 »
1914

Offline CDP

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Re: Blue Town
« Reply #25 on: April 09, 2013, 13:57:08 »
HB.Re: "I am not sure when Blue Town became known as Blue Town".

Was it decided by the Church Registers, the local newspaper, the Council, the local people?
I think it will be very difficult to decide.
e.g.
My father lived in the flat over the Sheppy (no " e") Gas Company, (I was born there), his letters were addressed to "Flat ?  above "Sheppy Gas Company " and for years it was always known as Sheppy long after Sheppey was used.
The solution to every problem is a.) time , or  b.) another problem.

Offline HERB COLLECTOR

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Re: Blue Town
« Reply #24 on: April 08, 2013, 23:16:19 »
I am not sure when Blue Town became known as Blue Town, does any body know?
In 1730 the area was known as the 'blue houses.' Sheppey diarist Stephen Rouse notes that there were sixteen 'blue houses' in 1754, and one hundred and thirty 'blue houses' in 1792.
Don't Let the Devil Ride Chris and Abby

 

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