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Author Topic: WWI Pontoon Bridge across the Thames  (Read 7039 times)

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Offline Stewie

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Re: WWI Pontoon Bridge across the Thames
« Reply #8 on: November 10, 2009, 18:35:08 »
Found another article which is an archieved report from the New York Times dated 27th December 1914. This explains that the bridge is for the rapid deployment of troops from Kent to Essex in the event of a German invasion of the East coast. It also states that the bridge was left open during the day and closed at night time as required.

Follow the link, the article opens in pdf documennt.

http://query.nytimes.com/gst/abstract.html?res=9904E2D7153FE233A25754C2A9649D946596D6CF

merc

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Re: WWI Pontoon Bridge across the Thames
« Reply #7 on: November 10, 2009, 12:23:43 »
It was also used as a barrier. A number of ships rammed into it.

That's all i can find out...

Offline Paul

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Re: WWI Pontoon Bridge across the Thames
« Reply #6 on: November 10, 2009, 11:27:18 »
I wonder if they left the 800ft section out and only put it in place when required?
Maybe it's big horse I'm a Londoner. :{

Offline Stewie

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Re: WWI Pontoon Bridge across the Thames
« Reply #5 on: November 09, 2009, 22:15:33 »
Had a look on the internet and found another picture on the Gravesham Borough Council website. This appears to be a view from the Gravesend shoreline. Not much written detail though.

http://www.discovergravesham.co.uk/the-river/the-fortification-of-the-thames-1380-1956.html

merc

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Re: WWI Pontoon Bridge across the Thames
« Reply #4 on: November 09, 2009, 21:36:12 »
Some good points there Stewie.

I don't know when it was dismantled, but it had gone by 1920.


Found this in The Times:

Thursday, April 19, 1917

The owners, master and crew of the steam tug Premier, of Gravesend were awarded ?200 yesterday in the City of London Court for salvage services rendered to the steamship Fredriksberg, which drifted on to the pontoon bridge at Gravesend in a gale in January.

Offline Stewie

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Re: WWI Pontoon Bridge across the Thames
« Reply #3 on: November 09, 2009, 20:05:31 »
Thankyou Merc, this is something I have never heard of before!
If the Port of London was as busy as they state, then there would presumably be a lot of requirment to move the 800 foot section to allow ships in and out of the river. Unless the the ships were 'flighted' into large groups or access beyond this point depends on tides. Also the part of the pontoon bridge 'river' side of the break would have to be anchored quite well (at least better than the other pontoons) to stop the whole thing being carried away when the 800 foot section was removed.
This must have been quite an engineering feat! The cumulative drag on all those pontoons when the tide was flowing in or out, together with the stresses of passing traffic as well must have made for some interesting crossings!
 

Guest

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Re: WWI Pontoon Bridge across the Thames
« Reply #2 on: November 09, 2009, 19:31:53 »
So when was this then taken down merc?
it must have been an incredible sight to see this or even go over it.

merc

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WWI Pontoon Bridge across the Thames
« Reply #1 on: November 09, 2009, 11:29:25 »
During the First World War a pontoon bridge was put across the Thames between Clarendon Lawn (Gravesend) and Tilbury Fort. It was almost half a mile long and was supported by 67 pontoons. It was built and maintained by the Engineering Department of the Port of London Authority. The bridge was used to convey troops and equipment across the river, and had an 800 feet long section near the Essex side that could be moved by tugs to allow shipping to pass.

 

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