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Author Topic: Gore Court, King Georges Playing Field, Sittingbourne  (Read 23619 times)

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Offline Bryn Clinch

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Re: Gore Court, King Georges Playing Field, Sittingbourne
« Reply #28 on: January 28, 2013, 13:05:27 »
The old Paddling Pool/Sand Pit as it is today. Four very large, timber surrounded `planters` but with some of the the original `walls` of the pool intact.
I was hoping to get a photo of the Pavilion where, after WWII, ice cream was sold via a window in this building. I think it came in large, cardboard covered blocks which were cut to size, Wall`s I think, a rare treat in those days. It was always a rush to get there before they `sold out` and an even bigger rush to get it home before it melted. There were children playing directly in front of the Pavilion, probably a nursery school, so I didn`t take the risk as I expect alarm bells would have rung. The frightening thing was that I nearly did it without thinking!

Offline grandarog

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Re: Gore Court, King Georges Playing Field, Sittingbourne
« Reply #27 on: January 14, 2013, 15:48:17 »
In regards to post 13 in this thread. I have found this rather exaggerated statement postcard. At approximately 2 to 3 feet deep. The water was usually at least 6 inches down from the rim so to swim was to lay down with hands on the bottom and kick your legs.
  Always known as a paddling pool during  my childhood. :)

Offline Lyn L

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Re: Gore Court, King Georges Playing Field, Sittingbourne
« Reply #26 on: October 08, 2012, 15:54:49 »
I shall have to have a visit to The Forum very soon, haven't been for a while and I know things have been added. Thanks SB  :)
Half our life is spent trying to find something to do with the time we have rushed through life tryi

Offline sheppey_bottles

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Re: Gore Court, King Georges Playing Field, Sittingbourne
« Reply #25 on: October 08, 2012, 14:07:29 »
For anyone looking for books on Sittingbourne, Murston etc., and especially barge and brick books, the Anglo-Saxon CSI exhibition? in the Forum at Sittingbourne is also manned by the Heritage Museum and a really nice collection of books may be found there. I am not 100% sure but I seem to remember seeing the George Bargebrick book in the window the other day...Don't hold your breath though. I can thoroughly recommend this book, it is a wealth of info. on the man, his life and the company etc.

darrenh

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Re: Gore Court, King Georges Playing Field, Sittingbourne
« Reply #24 on: October 23, 2011, 19:29:06 »
From "History and Topographical Survey of the County of Kent" 1797

Quote
GORE-COURT is an antient seat in this parish, about half a mile distant eastward from Ufton, which gave name to the family who possessed it, called in old writings at-Gore. Henry at-Gore held Gore-court at his death in the 31st year of king Edward III. His descendants continued possessed of it for several generations, till at last James Gore sold it to Thomas Roydon, of East Peckham, whose son sold it to Mr. Christopher Wood, descended from those of Muston manor, in Hollingborne. His son Mathew Wood possessed it on his decease, as did his son Henry, whose son Christopher Wood, of Gore-court, in 1674, alienated it to Charles Seager, of Tunstall, who dying in 1679, left three sons, Charles, Henry, and William, and a daughter Jane, who married Mr. John Nethersole, of Barham, and they shared this estate among them. Of the sons, Henry died unmarried, and William parted with his interest in it to his elder brother Charles Seager, of Borden, who-joining with his sister Jane Nethersole, widow, conveyed the manor of Gore, in 1723, to Edward Mores, clerk, rector of this parish, descended of a good family, of Great Coxwell, in Berkshire. He bore for his arms four coats, Quarterly, first and fourth, Mores, argent, on a fess couped, gules, between three heathcocks, gules, a garb, or; second and third, Rowe, gules, a quaterfoil, or. (fn. 9) He died possessed of it in 1740, and was succeeded in it by his only son Edward Rowe Mores, who was of Low Layton, in Essex, M. A. and F. R. S. and published several tracts of antiquity and other subjects, and left several in MSS. unpublished, among which was, the history of this parish, since published by Mr. Nicholls. He died in 1778. Before his death he alienated this estate to Mr. Charles Stanley, who afterwards resided here. He died in 1791, and his heirs sold it to Gabriel Harper, esq. who rebuilt this seat at a great expence, and served his shrievalty here in 1795, he continues the proprietor of it, and now resides at it.

So a manor house on the site dates back to the mid 14th century, rebuilt extensively in georgian style, pictured above, by Harper in 1795.

darrenh

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Re: Gore Court, King Georges Playing Field, Sittingbourne
« Reply #23 on: October 23, 2011, 19:20:01 »
Found this picture on LKS earlier, care of Keith Neaves.


Offline grandarog

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Re: Gore Court, King Georges Playing Field, Sittingbourne
« Reply #22 on: June 04, 2011, 17:57:10 »
The brick wall round the tank at Glovers was to protect the tank structure. It was not there to hold the water, merely to protect the canvas from being punctured by sharp objects etc. (possibly youngsters leaning there bikes if the wall wasn`t there). I thought it was demolished earlier but as you say you remember it in the 50s. I stand corrected.

exopper

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Re: Gore Court, King Georges Playing Field, Sittingbourne
« Reply #21 on: June 03, 2011, 20:44:06 »
Young though I maybe grandarog, but the SWT I remember in the crescent of cottages was most certainly brick not canvas. It may have started with WD issue material, but well into the 1950s the brick [skin?] was in place. I leaned my bike against it many times, yet I cannot remember who I was visiting there?

Offline grandarog

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Re: Gore Court, King Georges Playing Field, Sittingbourne
« Reply #20 on: June 03, 2011, 19:54:37 »
There was never a huge tank in King Georges as far as I am aware. The one opposite the memorial on the green in front of Glovers Crescent was an over ground canvas and steel frame Emergency tank of the standard 66.000 gallon Wartime Fire Fighting water reserve. It was removed very shortly after 1945. As ex hopper was so young the paddling pool would appear huge as it was up the bank from the walkway through the park.

darrenh

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Re: Gore Court, King Georges Playing Field, Sittingbourne
« Reply #19 on: June 02, 2011, 22:23:37 »
its only about 2 feet deep at its maximum though ?  unless it was filled and converted to a pool ?

exopper

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Re: Gore Court, King Georges Playing Field, Sittingbourne
« Reply #18 on: June 02, 2011, 22:01:34 »
The huge rectangular tank at the Woodstock Road end of the park was a Static Water Tank I believe, installed by the military. There used to be another in the crescent of cottages opposite the Cottage Hospital in Bell Road, a much deeper tank, but on a restricted site.

Have both been demolished?

darrenh

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Re: Gore Court, King Georges Playing Field, Sittingbourne
« Reply #17 on: June 02, 2011, 00:14:25 »
Thanks for the info, so 20th century, that makes more sense.  I think its had an access path cut through it now, but it was a complete "tub" when I was young but no water or sand.  We used to say it was an old roman bath which is obviously naive, but then we were kids and that tends to happen with the absence of facts !!

Offline grandarog

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Re: Gore Court, King Georges Playing Field, Sittingbourne
« Reply #16 on: June 01, 2011, 22:10:21 »
Hi Darren, :)
                 Yes, in my childhood it was a Paddling pool/ boating lake. I believe it was then a sand pit play area for some time. It was colonised by bushes and shrubs last time I saw it. Directly in front of the Pavilion buildings (old stables for the Mansion) at the park edge used to be a Putting Green. Got the putters and balls from a little building by the road between the car park at the rear and the swing park. When I was a kid there was a swing boat which was a long plank with loop hand holds and a seat at each end which was propelled by using feet on the footboards each side (long since declared illegal) which with a lot of effort could be got up to the bumps, which was when it hit the limit stops.

darrenh

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Re: Gore Court, King Georges Playing Field, Sittingbourne
« Reply #15 on: June 01, 2011, 21:43:48 »
In lieu of any help with that, I did some searching and found this picture of the 18th century mansion, being used as a military hospital during WW1 I believe.

Guessing the pads in your picture are for the pillars??



Apparently the remaining buildings in the park were the stables for the mansion.

darrenh

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Re: Gore Court, King Georges Playing Field, Sittingbourne
« Reply #14 on: June 01, 2011, 20:34:21 »
grandarog, do you know the origin of the huge rectanglular bath type structure, at the Woodstock Road end of King Georges? 

 

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