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Author Topic: Sergeant Frederick Thomas Peake  (Read 10108 times)

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Offline kyn

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Re: Sergeant Frederick Thomas Peake
« Reply #15 on: October 17, 2017, 21:26:43 »
I am pointing out that they have been restored on the more interesting posts.  I won't be doing it for all.  This was something that really caught my attention and as the images I am restoring are from around 2010 they will be from posts that we have all forgotten about or haven't seen!

I am glad they are still catching peoples attention 7 years later :)

Offline conan

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Re: Sergeant Frederick Thomas Peake
« Reply #14 on: October 17, 2017, 19:08:54 »
Although it's a pain that these images are having to be restored I must admit I am now looking at pages I hadn't seen before,this one especially I found extremely interesting so thank you kyn.
To remain ignorant of what happened before you were born is to remain a child......Cicero

Offline kyn

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Re: Sergeant Frederick Thomas Peake
« Reply #13 on: October 17, 2017, 17:59:29 »
Images restored

Offline peterchall

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Re: Sergeant Frederick Thomas Peake
« Reply #12 on: December 15, 2011, 23:27:03 »
I've read more than once that for disciplined fighting formations in general, in all wars, that the ' straw that breaks the camel's back' so far as willingness to fight, or breakdown in morale, is concerned is a casualty rate of 33%.
It's no use getting old if you don't get artful

Offline HERB COLLECTOR

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Re: Sergeant Frederick Thomas Peake
« Reply #11 on: December 15, 2011, 21:33:18 »
From the National Archives;
"Casualty figures for the charge of the Light Brigade total 110 killed, 130 wounded and 58 captured, a loss of some 40% of the Brigades strength."
http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/battles/crimea/charge.htm Click on casualty return.
WO1/369f.685 (22-26 Oct 1854)

Offline snodlandmalc

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Re: Sergeant Frederick Thomas Peake
« Reply #10 on: December 15, 2011, 16:34:24 »
I would have thought trying to desert in the crimea would have been very hazardous ? Its a peninsular so escape routes would have been restricted.Although the ingenuity of a deserter wouldnt let that stop them ! my own great grandfather deserted on the north west frontier in India in the 1890's but was recaptured in weymouth,how did he manage that !
Another reason for deaths around the world was the fact that a year after the end of the crimean war the Indian Mutiny started.I believe the 17th lancers were sent directly there and several of their number died from disease.But other regiments were sent for garison duties around the world to replace those rushed to India.The 93rd who fought at Balaklava were part of the second relief force at Lucknow with several of the veterans being killed at the Secunderbagh.
Casualties in 19th Century campaigns are always surprising,and much lower than you would think,most of the time.Take Rorkes Drift only 27 were killed or wounded on the British side,which doesnt seem many but as there was only 138 british troops there,thats a casualty rate of 20% so depends how you look at it.

Offline CDP

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Re: Sergeant Frederick Thomas Peake
« Reply #9 on: December 15, 2011, 12:14:39 »
Very interesting HC i wonder which expert was more  correct .I know that Francis Horton had spent a lifetime researching  Family History  ,and the Light Brigade , and was well respected " up North " for his work and was always being invited to give talks to Societies etc . I suppose one day an expert will arrive at a completely different ,and proven , view to both these men . I await it with interest.
I did hear tell from another "expert" that some soldiers  knowing what was about to happen , on the night before the Charge said " Blow that for a game of soldiers " and decided to leave the Army .As a result their deaths were recorded much later in various parts of the World .Other experts insisted that they had moved there . Who was correct ?.
The solution to every problem is a.) time , or  b.) another problem.

Offline HERB COLLECTOR

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Re: Sergeant Frederick Thomas Peake
« Reply #8 on: December 14, 2011, 22:41:11 »
It is a misconception to assume that the majority of men who charged at Balaklava were killed. It was less than 17%.
The following figures are taken from "Hell Riders. The truth About the Charge of the Light Brigade" by Terry Brighton.
The author is a member of the Crimean War Research Society and has worked on the curatorial staff of the Queens Royal Lancers Regimental Museum.
On pages 290-292, he details the men who took part in the charge, pages 336-360 list the men in the 5 regiments involved, together with those known to have been in the charge.
The author comes to the conclusion that "The known facts allow a total of 666 officers and men in the charge. No fewer. There may have been more."

After the charge 195 mounted men answered their names, these were the men still mounted and capable of being deployed in action. Dismounted men were still walking back, others were wounded or taken prisoner.
"The most reliable casualty figures for the charge of the Light Brigade based on returns made on the day after the charge are therefore:
Killed outright or died of their wounds     110
Wounded and returned to lines:            129
Wounded and taken prisoner:                 32
Total killed and wounded:                     271

This means that of the 666 who began the advance, 271 became casualties and an incredible 395 (or 60 per cent) rode one and a quarter miles under fire from the Russian guns, attacked and pursued the Russian cavalry behind the guns, and returned up the valley with the enemy at their backs unscathed except for minor wounds not reported to the surgeons.
Less than 17 per cent had been killed.
Some of the wounded were later to die at Scutari-though not necessarily of their wounds; disease was rife on the wards-and a number died of their wounds in Russia.........Yet in total contradiction of popular notions of the casualty figures more than 75 per cent of the officers and men who rode hell's mile were either unhurt or recovered from their wounds.

Offline CDP

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Re: Sergeant Frederick Thomas Peake
« Reply #7 on: December 06, 2011, 15:28:25 »

Sergeant     Frederick Thomas Peake,

 

13th Light Dragoons

A Sheppey man

A survivor of The Charge of the Light Brigade. October 25th 1854.

Born November 17th

Died 18th December 1906 aged 77  The  last survivor of his battle regiment .

Grave Location Halfway Cemetary site 83FF

 

Lord Cardigan formed his ten squadrons in two lines numbering from the right the 13th Light Dragoons , the 17th Lancers, and the 11th Hussars, in the second , the 8th Hussars and the 4th Light Dragoons .

Lord Lucan did not approve of this arrangement and drawing the 11th Hussars from the first line he placed them in the left rear of the 17th Lancers .Thus the Brigade formed three lines. The whole did not amount to many more than 600.

The signal was given and into the valley of Death rode the 600 .

The Brigade went over the brow of the hill at a trot .  At once they came under the fire of the guns on the Fedonkine heights .  On went the Brigade .    In the race of Death they had to run the course which was more than a mile long .After the heroic charge Lord Cardigan rode up to the front and said “ Men, this is a great blunder ; but it is no fault of mine “  And the men cheered and replied “ Never mind my Lord we are ready to go back again “
Of the 670 who rode into the Valley of Death there were left only 195 mounted men , and all this havoc was wrought within the short period of 20 minutes

 It was as a mere boy that Mr. Peake first became imbued with the desire to join the Army , he was then about 18 years of age .
He was the possessor of two medals .one in connection with the Crimea the other being with three bars, viz. Alma , Sebastopol , and Balaclava.

He left two sons and two daughters.

He was buried with full Military Honours , the gun carriage drawn by four fine animals , the firing party consisted of 20 strong formed up in single file on either side of his house and presently the bearers came forth carrying their sad burden  shoulder high to the gun carriage .The band of the Royal Navy Gunnery School Sheerness was now playing The Dead March by Saul and the sympathetic beat  of the muffled drums combined with the softened notes of the cornets at once touched one’s emotions .In most cases all house blinds were drawn on the route . The final incident in connection with the funeral  was a touching one … It consisted  of the firing of three volleys over the grave by the firing party and between each  volley two buglers played “ The Last Post “ and that well known hymn “Now the labourers task is o’er “

 Many years ago whilst compiling my Family Tree , part of the process was to search all hard copies of the old Sheerness Times/Guardian kept in the Sheerness Library and extract all references to my relations      I had just started and  thought that I would also extract anything else that may be of use to Family Historians having had a lot of help from other people..

For example  I noticed a yearly meeting of the survivors of the Charge of the Light Brigade and of course the number  attending each year was less and less  but I thought this may be of interest to some one some day so I copied these also.

For example  , the matinee performance of The Alhambra (??) London in October 1910 was preceded by the Annual  Balaclava  Reunion  and this  was attended by some eleven survivors .

 In 1979 I wrote to Francis K Horton who was compiling a list of the Survivors of the Charge and he was delighted to receive my letter as the information that he had was   F T Peake was buried  at Thornton Heath in Surrey. But he could never find the grave. This is because he was taken ill and died at his sons house in Thornton Heath but his body was taken to Sheerness   for burial.

He lived at 37 Alma Road and his 75th birthday was November 17th 1907
I also located for Francis  the memorial to  Lewis Edward Nolan another survivor ,who was the first to be killed at the head of the Brigade charge ,  this is  in  what was The Holy Trinity Church  Maidstone , and is now a general meeting place, near the multi storey car park.

There is also a memorial  to William Harris of the 8th Hussars in the churchyard of Harrietsham , he survived the Charge and four months later died of cholera at Sailasi in   Turkey.

Many survivors graves have  also turned up in Ireland and many other parts of theWorld.

As Francis was working on his book  he asked me to pin point the exact location of the grave  so I  went to the Halfway Cemetary and in the potting shed , among all the flower pots plants and dirt  ,in one of the drawers  of the bench were the 4 books containing all the burials from 1850 to 1950. ( I photocopied these four books and put them on my web page   http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~penney/  should  these books be destroyed or lost )

 I located F.T.Peakes burial site which was a mass of ivy , these  I cleared away  and there was a broken column on the floor  , crossed swords and a shako , (the  hat.) I spent all day cleaning the memorial  of ivy and years of accumulated lichen and replacing the broken column ,  I then took photographs which were sent on to Francis  together with the detailed directions on how to reach  the grave  from the Cemetary entrance  He was very pleased and he said they would be in his book , a private  edition called “ One  Hussar “ on the Survivors of the Charge

By 1979 he had located  190 headstones and  had approximately another 200 to find with good leads on 80 to 100 of these. He also corresponded with 40 separate descendants of survivors

In 1892 I wrote to Francis because  a member of the Kent Family History Society owned a  diary of a soldier  written up to   the night before  the “  Charge “.  And he was allowed access to it   , he was delighted.

Francis Horton has given his lecture on The Survivors of the Charge of the Light Brigade to York, Hollingham, Norwich, Chelmsford, Bristol and Avon    Family History Societies , the  FH Federation at Birmingham, the Guild of One Name Studies  etc etc,            In 1981 he was invited to be the Chairman of Stourbridge Family History Society.

He always starts his talks  by blowing the  “Charge “ on the bugle that was actually used on that fateful day. Very eerie .  In the reading room of the National Army Museum  they have seven photographs of Sergt. F.T.Peake   one portrait, three of his funeral ,  one of his memorial, and two groups at reunions.

He treasured the uniform which he wore in the Famous Charge  the sleeve of which was perforated by the bullet which wounded his arm and would wear it at Benevolent Concerts in aid of charitable events when he would recite Tennyson poem  ” Into the Valley of Death “

In January 1907 The Town held a meeting to suggest a suitable public Memorial to him as he had resided in Sheerness for a very considerable  portion of his life .The Rev. Noblet said that Mr. Peake was always straight forward, upright and most civil and obliging as a civilian.. .Mr. Peake was willing to do all he could to  help anyone in distress . He had dared to die and never liked to speak about himself and the Charge of the Light Brigade. When one spoke to Mr. Peake about the battle he quietly proceeded to talk on another subject. Mr.W J Penney suggested that a committee should be appointed  to prepare a scheme to lay before another meeting .This committee could prepare an estimate as to the probable cost of a Memorial. This was agreed upon and the memorial was later erected over his grave.

 

A headstone of such a soldier should never be allowed to become hidden again .It should be proudly shown and maintained

SOME  CRIMEAN VETERANS FROM SHEPPEY

 J.S  OUTHERN   J TROTTER   W.WALSH   G.BLACKMORE
 J.WHITING  F.GRIFFITHS.
 J.BENTLEY  BOWDER    J.BROTHERS   J.EASTCOTT   G.LANCASTER  R.LEDDEN
 E.LEDGER   G.PHILPOTT 

 VARIOUS OTHER  VETERANS FROM SHEPPEY
 
M.BLACKMORE    Battle of  BALACLAVA
LAWTON         Battle of  WATERLOO
LEONARD        Battle of  TRAFALGAR
H.MATTHEWS     LUCKNOW
J.MOORE        INDIAN MUTINY
POVER          DR.LIVINGSTONE’s EXPEDITION
H.STRONG       POLAR EXPEDITION
I.STUBBERFIELD ARTIC EXPLORER
 

 
The solution to every problem is a.) time , or  b.) another problem.

Offline CDP

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Re: Sergeant Frederick Thomas Peake
« Reply #6 on: February 17, 2011, 19:32:40 »
Thanks for that  unfairytale.I don't know if Francis Horton is still around these days ,I will have to make enquires, and see if he has that data on the KHF
The solution to every problem is a.) time , or  b.) another problem.

Offline unfairytale

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Re: Sergeant Frederick Thomas Peake
« Reply #5 on: February 17, 2011, 18:12:43 »
Liuetenant Charles Wooden VC. Took part in the charge. He's buried at St. James's Cemetery, Dover. He killed himself on the morning of Monday 26th of April 1876 in the Officers Quarters of the Grand Shaft Barracks. His family couldn't afford a headstone, it was paid for by his fellow officers.

  Wooden took the unusual step of writing to the Army to ask for a VC: He was not included in the list of 85 awards handed out after the battle.
 
 Wooden's acting commander, Captain William Morris was badly injured during the charge and Wooden, with Surgeon James Mouat volunteered to go out and rescue him. Under heavy fire they attended Morris's wounds and brought him back to the British lines. Morris made a full recovery. Mouat was awarded the VC but Wooden was not, even though they had shared the same danger. Wooden believed this was due to classism or the fact that he had a strong German accent; he was born in London of German parentage. After first refusing his request the Army eventually relented and he eventually recieved his VC four years after the action.
When you've got your back to wall, there's only one thing to do and that's to turn around and fight. (John Major)
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Offline CDP

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Re: Sergeant Frederick Thomas Peake
« Reply #4 on: February 17, 2011, 16:50:14 »
Years ago when I was in contact with Francis Horton he  partly doubted the poem as he had found that some ? of the chargers burials had turned up " all over the world " and someone had wondered  why this was .
The solution to every problem is a.) time , or  b.) another problem.

Offline kyn

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Re: Sergeant Frederick Thomas Peake
« Reply #3 on: September 25, 2009, 17:36:34 »
Sergeant Frederick Peake

Severely wounded in the Charge

Born 17th November 1832 - Dublin

Died 18th December _ Thornton Heath

Enlisted November 1846

Medals Crimea (A.B.S.), Turkish Medal

Medals donated to the National Army Museum by Mrs. E Peake.

Enlisted into the 13th Light Dragoons at the age of 18, his middle name shown as Thomas on some records.  Promoted to Sergeant during the voyage to the East.  His arm was broken by a canister shot during the Charge, afterwards sent to Scutari Hospital.  He was invalided to England on the 20th December 1854 and stayed in the invalid depot at Chatham during 1955.  In January 1856 he was discharged from the Army with a pension of 1/3 per day as a result of his injuries.  Having been educated and able to read and write Frederick was able to obtain a job as a clerk in the military stores which gave him an increased pension.  In the 1880?s Peake was living at 128 High Street, Minster in Sheppey, Kent with his wife Ellen, their two sons Frederick, William and a daughter Georgina.  Signed the Loyal Address to the Queen in 1887 on the occasion of her Jubilee.

Peake was to experience hardship later in life and aged 62 received assistance from the Light Brigade Relief Fund c/o Rev J Reakes, St Pauls Vicarage, Sheerness, and also claimed from the T.H. Roberts Fund.  In the late 1890?s he lived at 37 Alma Road, Sheerness, Kent.  He died on the 18th December 1906 aged 77 and was the last survivor of his regiment.  Buried at Halfway Cemetery site 83FF, with full Military Honours, the gun carriage drawn by four fine animals.  The firing party, 20 strong, formed up in single file on either side of his house and presently the bearers came fourth carrying their sad burden shoulder high to the gun carriage.  The band of the Royal Navy Gunnery School Sheerness playing The Dead March in Saul and the sympathetic beat f the muffled drums combined with the softened notes of the cornets at once touched one's emotions.  In most cases all house blinds were drawn on the route.  The final incident in connection with the funeral was a touching one...it consisted of the firing of three volleys over the grave by the firing party and between each volley two buglers played "The Last Post" and that well known hymn "Now the labourer's task is over".

Peake's eldest son Frederick was in the Royal Engineers, fighting in the Boer War and the First World War.  In 1955 he attended the Crimean Luncheon at the Connaught Rooms.  Frederick's medals and those of his son Frederick Jnr, a Queen's South Africa Medal and World War I trio, were presented to the National Army Museum in 1956 along with the coatee he wore during the Charge.  Held in the National Army Museum is a small leather bound note book containing a list of 72 chargers and their home addresses who were known to Sergeant Peake.  All of the men are confirmed chargers except for Robert Ashton who was an imposter. 

From here: http://books.google.co.uk/books?id=CwDdEHu2hVgC&pg=PT256&lpg=PT256&dq=sergeant+Peake+Sheerness&source=bl&ots=UpSUUwLtGT&sig=2nH4UGh6NeeDZ_zj80v8_PhqDWs&hl=en&ei=g968Sv-4MNG14QarkOXECQ&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=1#v=onepage&q=sergeant%20Peake%20Sheerness&f=false

Offline kyn

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Re: Sergeant Frederick Thomas Peake
« Reply #2 on: September 20, 2009, 09:12:20 »
37 Alma Road

I wonder if he chose the road purposely?
Half this road on this side are lovely old three storey buildings, all a bit run down now.  I was hoping this one would not have been modernised so much...

Offline kyn

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Sergeant Frederick Thomas Peake
« Reply #1 on: September 17, 2009, 16:06:07 »
Sergeant Frederick Thomas Peake was born on the 17th November 1829 and from an early age wished to be in the army, at age 18 he started looking into the possibility of following his dream and eventually worked his way up to Sergeant in the 13th Light Dragoons.  He was sent to the Battle of Alma in 1854 before being involved in the Battle of Balaclava where he was one of very few men who survived the Charge of the Light Brigade on the 25th October 1854, although he was shot and severely injured.  During the battle it was later found Sergeant Peake kept a list of "chargers" he knew in a leather bound notebook, each name of those that died were crossed out.

Sergeant Frederick Peake died through illness at the age of 77 on 18th December 1906, he was the last survivor from his battle regiment.  He was buried with full military honours and a gun carriage drawn by four horses and a firing party of 20 men was lined in single file either side of his house at 37 Alma Road, Sheerness whilst the bearers carried his coffin and placed it on the gun carriage.  The Royal Navy Gunnery School band at Sheerness played "The Dead March" by Saul and the blinds of neighbouring houses were drawn on the route.  Three volleys were fired over his grave with the buglers playing "The Last Post" and the hymn "Now the Labourers Task is O'er"

During charitable events he often wore the uniform that he wore during the charge and recited the poem written about the event by Tennyson, "The Into the Valley of Death".

The Charge Of The Light Brigade
by Alfred, Lord Tennyson
Memorializing Events in the Battle of Balaclava, October 25, 1854
Written 1854


Half a league half a league,
Half a league onward,
All in the valley of Death
Rode the six hundred:
'Forward, the Light Brigade!
Charge for the guns' he said:
Into the valley of Death
Rode the six hundred.

'Forward, the Light Brigade!'
Was there a man dismay'd ?
Not tho' the soldier knew
Some one had blunder'd:
Theirs not to make reply,
Theirs not to reason why,
Theirs but to do & die,
Into the valley of Death
Rode the six hundred.

Cannon to right of them,
Cannon to left of them,
Cannon in front of them
Volley'd & thunder'd;
Storm'd at with shot and shell,
Boldly they rode and well,
Into the jaws of Death,
Into the mouth of Hell
Rode the six hundred.

Flash'd all their sabres bare,
Flash'd as they turn'd in air
Sabring the gunners there,
Charging an army while
All the world wonder'd:
Plunged in the battery-smoke
Right thro' the line they broke;
Cossack & Russian
Reel'd from the sabre-stroke,
Shatter'd & sunder'd.
Then they rode back, but not
Not the six hundred.

Cannon to right of them,
Cannon to left of them,
Cannon behind them
Volley'd and thunder'd;
Storm'd at with shot and shell,
While horse & hero fell,
They that had fought so well
Came thro' the jaws of Death,
Back from the mouth of Hell,
All that was left of them,
Left of six hundred.

When can their glory fade?
O the wild charge they made!
All the world wonder'd.
Honour the charge they made!
Honour the Light Brigade,
Noble six hundred!

 

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