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Author Topic: Brompton Barracks.  (Read 83713 times)

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Offline cliveh

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Re: Brompton Barracks.
« Reply #91 on: June 22, 2012, 12:44:34 »
A few postcards of the Barracks from my collection; two of the R.E.Band and another two from a 1933 Church Parade:

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Offline kyn

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Re: Brompton Barracks.
« Reply #90 on: May 17, 2012, 22:48:13 »
Why am I not surprised by that  :)

Offline Leofwine

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Re: Brompton Barracks.
« Reply #89 on: May 17, 2012, 22:36:17 »
Ty :)  I thought it would be, but wanted to make sure. (Steals it and adds it to his collection of Brompton related news items!)
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Offline kyn

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Re: Brompton Barracks.
« Reply #88 on: May 17, 2012, 22:35:05 »
That would have been the Times  :)

Offline Leofwine

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Re: Brompton Barracks.
« Reply #87 on: May 17, 2012, 22:30:02 »
Which paper was the 'Officer Shot' story from kyn?
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Offline kyn

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Re: Brompton Barracks.
« Reply #86 on: May 17, 2012, 19:09:54 »
WAR OFFICE (AUXILIARY FORCES)— OFFICERS OF INFANTRY MILITIA— SCHOOL OF MILITARY ENGINEERING, CHATHAM.

HC Deb 31 July 1888

MR. RADCLIFFE COOKE(Newington, W.)
 asked the Secretary of State for War, Whether, by the Regulations for the Militia, paragraph 359, officers of Infantry Militia are forbidden to attend classes formed at the School of Military Engineering, Chatham; whether there is a special course of instruction at Chatham in field fortification which officers of the Line are permitted to attend; whether the Government will consider the advisability of altering the present Regulations, so as to permit at least one officer of Militia per battalion to attend such course of instruction at Chatham, in order that there may be in each battalion one officer capable of teaching field fortification of a simple character?

THE SECRETARY OF STATE (Mr. E. STANHOPE)(Lincolnshire, Horncastle)
 The answer to the first two Questions of my hon. Friend is, Yes. With regard to his third Question, I must observe that the School of Military Engineering at Chatham primarily exists for the instruction of officers and men of the Royal Engineers, and any instructional power which may remain after that object has been attained must be devoted to the Cavalry and Infantry of the Regular Army.

Offline kyn

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Re: Brompton Barracks.
« Reply #85 on: March 23, 2012, 12:55:11 »
12 August 1865

An Officer Shot at Chatham.

A deliberate and, it is feared, successful attempt was made to murder Major Francis Horatio De Vere, and officer of Royal Engineers attached to the head-quarters of the Royal Engineer establishment, Chatham, yesterday afternoon.  He was shot through the lungs, by a private Sapper of the corps, as he was stationed on the parade-ground of Brompton Barracks in the discharge of his military duties.  The perpetrator is a young man named Curry, who has been but a short time in the corps.  From the circumstances connected with the attempted murder, there is no doubt it had been planned some time previously.  The officers and men of the various companies had fallen in in front of their quarters in the barrack-square shortly after 1 o’clock I readiness to proceed to the fieldworks, and Major De Vere was at the time standing with a group of other officers in conversation.  On moving away a few paces and while he was in the act of giving some orders, the report of a rifle fired from one of the upper windows of the rooms occupied by the sappers was heard.  He instantly staggered forward, exclaiming “My God! My God! I am shot,” and fell into the arms of some of the officers who went to his assistance.  At the same moment the man who had discharged the rifle from the window retreated into the centre of the room and, putting down the rifle, walked into an adjoining apartment, where he was at once seized by Lieutenant Dunford and some men of the Royal Engineers.  The distance of the spot where Major De Vere was standing at the time he was shot was between 20 and 30 yards from the window from which the rifle was discharged.  At that moment his back was towards the window, the ball entering just below the shoulder and passing in a slightly downward direction into the lungs, and out just below the left breast.  The bullet then tore up the gravel and bounded over the heads of the men on parade, not one of whom, although there were several hundred in the barrack square at the time, was struck.
Major De Vere, who occupies a residence away from the barracks, was carried into No.5 house of the officers’ quarters, where medical assistance was at once obtained, Dr. Scabrook – a private medical practitioner in the neighbourhood – being promptly in attendance.  An examination of the wound made by the bullet showed that it would in all probability terminate fatally, the internal haemorrhage being very great.  At the time Curry committed the act he occupied No.4 room, K house, and he had that day been doing duty as cook’s mate, and the same afternoon would have resumed his ordinary engineering duties.  Major De Vere has only within a short time succeeded Col. Lovell, C.B., as instructor in field fortifications at the Royal Engineer establishment, and the accused has been under instruction for some time past.  The cause which led to the crime appears to have been that Major De Vere had caused curry to be confined in the cells for a period of six days for some military offence.  It is also stated that Major De Vere had reused to allow Curry to leave the fieldworks in consequence of his incompetency.  Curry seemed to have watched a favourable opportunity of being left lone in the barrack-room when he could discharge his rifle form the open window.  On being arrested a second rifle was found in the same room, and this had been likewise loaded by the prisoner, the inference being either that he had intended to discharge the second rifle at Major De Vere should the first shot have failed in striking him, or that he intended after shooting the officer to take his own life.  The accused on being arrested did not offer the least resistance, and made no remark.  He had been in the corps rather more than 12 months, and was transferred to the Royal Engineers from one of the cavalry regiments.  Major De Vere is an officer who has seen considerable service.  He was employed on a special mission in Turkey, and subsequently he served throughout the whole of the Crimean war, from the landing of the Allies to the fall of Sebastopol.  He is a Knight of the Legion of Honour, and is also decorated with the fifth class of the Medjidie.  He succeeded to the appointment of instructor in filed fortifications at Chatham about 12 months since, and is highly esteemed by his brother officers as well for his eminent services ad great ability as for the conscientious manner in which he performed the whole of his professional duties.
At the time our report was despatched last night, Major De Vere was still alive, but was gradually becoming weaker.  He was attended by Dr. J.A. Fraser, the principal medical officer of the garrison, and other medical officers, but the opinion was entertained that he could not survive the night.

Offline kyn

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Re: Brompton Barracks.
« Reply #84 on: March 21, 2012, 13:53:20 »







Offline Leofwine

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Re: Brompton Barracks.
« Reply #83 on: March 21, 2012, 13:23:59 »
That's an interesting close up on the old observatory kyn, since it shows it was no longer in use as an observatory but as a 'store for combustibles.'  I know the 1896/7 maps show the observatory gone from this spot and the new one present on Prince Henry's Bastion, but I wonder exactly when the Prince Henry's Observatory was built?  I had assumed the new one was built at around the time the old one was demolished, but it could be that both buildings were standing at the same time for a while.
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Offline kyn

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Re: Brompton Barracks.
« Reply #82 on: March 21, 2012, 11:11:02 »





Offline Sentinel S4

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Re: Brompton Barracks.
« Reply #81 on: March 20, 2012, 14:28:51 »
There was one 'War' won by a Steam Sapper. It terrified the Natives that much they just gave up and became part of the Empire........
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Offline Leofwine

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Re: Brompton Barracks.
« Reply #80 on: March 20, 2012, 13:33:58 »
Unfortunately I did not remember to photograph the date of these but I think they may be from 1895.

That date is likely the latest date it could be from one detail on the map. It shows the old observatory, which was gone before 1897 as far as I can make out. Sadly, I have not been able to find an exact date, other than the fact that it was thereby 1863 and was still there in 1879, but was gone by 1896/7. The replacement observatory was built on the southern ramparts of Prince Henry's Bastion and remained there until about the late 1950s/early 1960s.
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merc

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Re: Brompton Barracks.
« Reply #79 on: March 20, 2012, 12:58:09 »
Surprisingly the Royal Engineers were slow to use steam traction engines, and it wasn't until 1868 that they started to use Steam Sappers.


Offline kyn

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Re: Brompton Barracks.
« Reply #78 on: March 20, 2012, 10:54:37 »
I have some more detailed shots of this plan to add, I can only guess that the tramway was part of the training and moving heavy items around the site?  I do not think it left the Barrracks, but I may be wrong.

Offline Sentinel S4

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Re: Brompton Barracks.
« Reply #77 on: March 20, 2012, 10:40:39 »
Just been reading through this thread, the latest maps caught my eye. A couple of thing come to mind, the Steam Sapper (traction engine) seems to have some very basic armour plating on the smoke box, perch bracket (that holds the front axle and pivot in place) and motion covers (where the fly wheel is protecting the crankshaft) as well as a hinged chimney so that she could be driven through low gates. The second is that in these latest maps there is a tramway depicted. Any pics? Any remains? Any info?

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