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Offline kyn

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Re: Brompton Barracks.
« Reply #76 on: March 20, 2012, 08:56:42 »
Unfortunately I did not remember to photograph the date of these but I think they may be from 1895.





Offline kyn

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Re: Brompton Barracks.
« Reply #75 on: March 04, 2012, 23:39:17 »
1901

Offline kyn

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Re: Brompton Barracks.
« Reply #74 on: March 04, 2012, 21:03:31 »
R.E. Park 1944

Offline Leofwine

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Re: Brompton Barracks.
« Reply #73 on: February 26, 2012, 18:28:55 »
Kentish Gazette - Tuesday 02 October 1866

V. R.
WAR DEPARTMENT CONTRACTS.
NOTICE TO BUILDERS.

TENDERS are required for the following Service at Chatham, viz:-
Erecting one BLOCK of 8 LATRINES, and re-constructing 2 BLOCKS of PRIVIES as LATRINES, at Brompton Barracks.
Parties desiring to Tender for the execution of these works, must leave their names this Office on or before SATURDAY the 6th OCTOBER, 1866, and pay the sum of half-a-guinea for the Bills of Quantities, which will forwarded to each party as as prepared by the Government Surveyors.
The Secretary State for War does not bind himself to accept the lowest or any Tender.
Royal Engineer Office,
Chatham, 20th September, 1866.

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Offline kyn

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Re: Brompton Barracks.
« Reply #72 on: February 20, 2012, 20:07:12 »
Brompton Guard Rooms and Cells.

All the guard rooms and cells at Brompton Barracks are deficient in cubic space.
The north wing men’s guard room ought to contain 18 men by regulation, with only 264 cubic feet each.  At 600 cubic feet per man, it has accommodation for no more than 8 men.
The lock-up ought, by regulation, to hold 30 men, with 132 cubic feet per man, in a space barely sufficient for 7 men.
The south wing men’s guard room, like that of the north wing, has 18 men by regulation, where only 8 ought to be.
The lock-up may be filled with 30 men, giving 150 cubic feet to each, in a room only fit for 8 men at the outside.
The barrier men’s guard room is set apart for 22 men, by regulation, in a space sufficient for 8 men.
The prison cells are very small, and afford too little cubic space per man.
The cells in the north wing have a capacity of 705 cubic feet each.
There are 10 cells in the south wing which have no more than 312 cubic feet capacity each.
All the guard rooms and lock-ups are, in our opinion, overcrowded, and they all want ventilation.
The number if inmates ought to be reduced, or the guard rooms ought to be enlarged, and they ought to be ventilated.
The small size of the south wing prison cells show that better accommodation for prisoners is required.

Offline kyn

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Re: Brompton Barracks.
« Reply #71 on: February 18, 2012, 13:22:14 »
There is also a wash-house, with troughs and boilers, for the use of soldiers’ wives.
Good accommodation has been recently erected for married non-commissioned Officers and soldiers of the Royal Engineers.  There are rooms for the families of 4 Staff-Sergeants, and rooms also for 42 other families; but the rooms are small, they are built back to back, and there are no means of ventilation.  The gas burners are also unventilated, and diffuse the impure air from them through the atmosphere of the rooms.  Besides these houses there are rooms for 19 families of the Royal Engineers in another building.  There are likewise 4 small rooms in the south square for Staff-Sergeants.
There are two cook-houses belonging to the north wing of Brompton Barracks containing 16 boilers each, but there are no means of roasting or baking meat.
There are four cook-houses attached to the south wing, with boilers in each.  In one of these kitchens only are there two small brick ovens, capable of baking four large dishes of meat in each.
In the north square there is one kitchen with boilers, and one larger oven, capable of baking twelve dishes of meat.
The men are stated to appreciate this convenience very much.
The water supply in this Barrack being derived from the Dockyard works is defective for the reasons already stated.  It is not enough for sanitary purposes.
There are also underground tanks for storing rain water.  The water from one of these tanks was putrid, and stunk abominably.  The tank is close to very offensive privies, and appeared to have been polluted by leakage.
The drainage stated to require great attention in dry weather, apparently from deficiency in the water supply.  The drainage on the north side of the Barracks leads into a large covered cesspool, from which there is an overflow into the main sewer.
The arrangement is a very bad one, and ought to be done away with.  The latrine arrangements are far from being good.  They are very offensive; and in one instance the matter from a large latrine was seen penetrating the barrack wall below it.
Speaking generally, the drainage is defective, and as, in certain of the buildings, there are no gutters for removing the roof water, it is apt to render the ground floors damp.
There is no proper Hospital belonging to Brompton barracks; but 2 houses in the south wing, calculated to contain 384 men, were temporarily appropriated, at the time of our inspection, for 150 sick, with about 900 cubic feet for each.
Accommodation for sick obtained by appropriating barrack rooms for such a purpose, it is hardly necessary to say, must be of a very defective nature.  Hospitals require special structural arrangements to facilitate the recovery of their inmates, and to appropriate any part of a crowded barrack for such a purpose is simply to increase the crowding in the barrack rooms, and to endanger the health of the men as well as the safety of the sick.
In our opinion the Hospital accommodation necessary for the Royal Engineers and depot Battalions ought to be provided without delay, by extension of the Garrison Hospital upon an improved plan.
The sanitary defects in Brompton barracks may be summed up as follows:-  Overcrowding, defective ventilation, defective sewerage and latrines, defective cooking arrangements.
For the removal of which we recommend:_
1.   That 600 cubic feet be allotted to every man in barracks.
2.   That every barrack rim and school room be ventilated by a shaft carried from the ceiling to above the roof, and fresh air admitted through perforated zinc near the ceiling.
3.   That an additional water supply be obtained.
4.   That all the privies be converted into water latrines, with divisions of seats and doors, and flushed out daily.
5.   That all cesspools be abolished, and all drains connected directly with the sewers.
6.   That the roofs be guttered where required, and rain water cisterns provided above ground, and the present rain water ranks abolished.
7.   That all the kitchens be provided with the means of roasting and baking meat.
8.   That the barrack rooms in the south square be floored with wood, and additional light admitted into them.

Offline kyn

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Re: Brompton Barracks.
« Reply #70 on: February 16, 2012, 19:42:04 »
Brompton Barracks - 1858

These Barracks are situated within the Lines, and on the top of the hill behind the Dockyard.  The situation is open and airy.  The buildings form three sides of a large square, open to the east.  They cover about 11 acres of ground, and their general plan is such as to admit of a free circulation of air among the greater part at least of the ranges of building.
Their internal structure is not so good as the external arrangement of the blocks.  The barrack rooms are all built back to back, four rooms opening out of each passage, and having windows only on one side.  They are intended to accommodate from twelve to fifteen and eighteen men each, and the whole Barrack is fixed, by regulation, to hold 1,725 men.
There are two stories and a basement, and the rooms in the basement are partly used for barrack rooms.
The rooms in the “South Square” are situated in a succession of small quadrangles.  The floors are asphalted.  A drain runs under this part of the building.  The rooms are dark, and would be much improved by a wooden flooring over the asphalt, and by additional light and means of ventilation.
There are no privies or cook-houses attached to these quarters.
The Engineer Train occupy some new barracks, built in a square.  The rooms are over the stables, an arrangement always to be avoided if possible, but otherwise the rooms are airy and light.
The following is the accommodation in Brompton Barracks:-

Barrack Rooms.Number of Men according to Regulations.Number of Men at 600 cubic feet each.Number of Men for which there is deficient accommodation.
North and South Wings.
23 Rooms414230184
20 Rooms360200160
16 Rooms19212864
Rear Range.
20 Rooms320200120
1 Room1385
1 Room1284
North Square.
1 Room12111
12 Rooms15613224
13 Rooms18214339
2 Rooms3030None
2 Rooms3434None
111 Rooms1,7251,124601

In these 111 rooms there are, therefore, 601 men more than there should be if every man had 600 cubic feet of space.
These Barracks have no sufficient means of ventilation. The back to back rooms of the north and south wings communicate through the intervening walls by apertures covered by louvre boarding, but there are no apertures communicating with the external air.
The basement rooms are ventilated by apertures in the ceiling, communicating with the external air, but they are insufficient for the purpose.
The rooms in the North square are ventilated by openings into the chimney breast, near the ceiling, and they have also perforated zinc ventilators on the walls, but both act imperfectly.
There are no ventilators in the barrack rooms in the south square.  Throughout the building the ventilation is very imperfect.  This Barrack owes its comparative salubrity to its high, airy position, and the wide surface it covers, but certainly not to its internal sanitary arrangements.  If it happened to have been placed in a densely populated district it would have probably afforded a much higher state of sickness and mortality among its inmates that it does.
The Medical Officer reports the Barracks to have been healthy during the past twelve months.  They certainly have been so when compared with other barracks at ordinary times, but, nevertheless, there have been 113 admissions into hospital from fever out of a force of 1,121 men.
All the rooms are warmed by open grates, and lighted with gas.
There is no day room for the men.
There are fourteen school rooms, situated in the north wing.  They are of the usual dimensions of the barrack rooms.  They are used for the instruction of officers and soldiers of the Royal Engineers, and of the Honourable East India Company.
There is an infant and industrial school in the same building, with 103 scholars, with 94 cubic feet of space for each pupil.  Additional school room is required.
There are two libraries in the north wing, one for the serjeants and one for the privates.  There is also an excellent museum and model room.
There are eleven ablution rooms in the Barracks.
There are two on the basement story of the north wing, five on the basement story of the south wing, two on the level of the ground in the north squares and two in the south squares.
In nine of these rooms there is a cast-iron bath, but the use of these baths is restricted because of the occasional scarcity of water.  There is, however, a bathing pond to which the men can resort.
There is a most excellent laundry attached to these Barracks for the use of the Royal Engineers.  It is replete with every convenience, and exhibits, in practical operation, those improvements which ought to be introduced into all barracks.


more to come...

Offline Leofwine

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Re: Brompton Barracks.
« Reply #69 on: February 09, 2012, 22:27:39 »
The Married Men's Quarters, 1857
Photographs reproduced by permission of the Royal Engineers Museum www.re-museum.co.uk




These buildings can be seen on the right of the 1879 map that kyn posted
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Offline kyn

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Re: Brompton Barracks.
« Reply #68 on: February 09, 2012, 19:36:30 »
1879

Offline Leofwine

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Re: Brompton Barracks.
« Reply #67 on: February 08, 2012, 02:08:38 »
Kentish Gazette - Tuesday 02 July 1861

CHATHAM.
The commodious messroom recently erected by the Government at Brompton Barracks, Chatham, for the officers of the Royal and Indian Engineers was opened on Wednesday evening, on which occasion the officers gave a ball on a scale of great magnificence, the heads of the various departments and several hundred visitors belonging to the neighbourhood being present on the occasion.
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Offline Leofwine

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Re: Brompton Barracks.
« Reply #66 on: February 07, 2012, 23:35:34 »
Kentish Gazette - Tuesday 29 January 1861

TERRIBLE EXPLOSION AT CHATHAM.
Yesterday (Monday) week, shortly before noon, a frightful explosion occurred in that portion of the Royal Engineer establishment which is set apart for the manufacture of hand-grenades, fuses, and other missiles of a destructive character, by which a number of men employed in the factory were severely injured, some of the cases being likely to terminate fatally.
The part the Engineer establishment which the accident occurred was that which is known as the north gun shed, a long building extending about 200 feet in length by between 20 and 30 in width, the interior, which is not required for the guns and field pieces used by the Royal Engineers, being set apart for the stowage of the engineering implements in use by the sappers and miners, while the central portion is used as a manufactory for fuses, hand-grenades, &c, a number the sappers of the Royal and Indian Engineers being under daily instruction in the building. The working party, numbering about 30 men, and a few non-commissioned officers, nearly the whole being Indian Engineers, with a few of the Royals, commenced operations in the factory at the usual hour on Monday morning. The men were under the direction of sergeant-instructor named Adams, of the Royal Engineers, a man of great experience, and in every respect stated to be well qualified for the responsible post he fills. The work chiefly performed the Engineers consisted filling the grenades, shells, and fuses with a composition previously prepared. This composition, which consisted of fine powder and saltpetre, in about equal parts, with a small portion of sulphur, is known to be of a highly explosive character, and therefore great care is always required in its manipulation. Special directions were accordingly given to the men employed in the factory to use the utmost care in filling the tubes, the sergeant-instructor by personal observations ascertaining that his orders were carried out. The composition is dealt out to the men in moderate quantities, and placed in saucers by the side of each. The tubes and grenades are then filled and rammed tightly means of copper rod. This operation, which is technically known as "tamping," requires to be performed with great care, as any undue ramming of the composition will cause it to explode. Constant use and experience have enabled the men engaged in the work to know the exact number of blows which may be given to each fuse and grenade, and any beyond that number are likely to prove dangerous.
Everything connected with the work proceeded satisfactorily this morning until shortly before 12 o'clock, when the frightful explosion took place. Just before the accident occurred Adams noticed one of the engineers, named Smith, performing his work in a rather careless manner, and reprimanded him for it. The same man afterwards, finding a difficulty in ramming the composition into his fuse, asked the man next him to assist him, which he did, the two giving blow and blow. Suddenly the composition of the grenade which Smith held in his hand became ignited, Smith, who appeared paralyzed with fear, continuing to retain his hold of it. The fire from the grenade then communicated with the loosej composition lying about, which immediately ignited a large quantity of powder in a barrel, when the whole building blew up with a terrific explosion, resembling the discharge of artillery, and creating the utmost dismay throughout the entire establishment. The first explosion was followed number of other reports as the various heaps of grenades and fuses became ignited. The effects of the explosion were of the most serious character. The building itself was shaken to its foundation, while one entire side of the factory in which the work was being carried on was carried completely away, and the woodwork was blown a considerable distance. The force of the explosion being sideways the roof of the shed was not blown off, but portions of it were lifted, and the lead work, for a considerable length, rolled and twisted in an extraordinary manner.
Considering the number men employed at the time it seems surprising that several were not immediately killed, but as it is about a dozen are more or less seriously injured Sergeant Chapman and Sappers Goode and Elliott, of the Engineers, on the instant of the explosion occurring, were blown through the side of the shed and deposited in a coal yard some distance off. Chapman, With the exception of a few trifling bruises, escaped unhurt, but both Goode and Elliott are severely burnt and injured; they were both immediately conveyed to the hospital. Sapper Thomas Rogers, of the Indian Engineers, was so severely injured that he was not expected to survive. He was employed close to Smith when the explosion happened, and was injured so much about the face, head, and other parts of the body that should he recover it is feared that his sight is quite gone. Many of the engineers were almost entirely denuded of their clothing, which was blown off by the explosion, and two or three are suffering severely from burns, from their clothes taking fire. One man had the entire front of his clothes blown away, and was much injured. Seven men, who were suffering severely, were admitted into the Royal Engineer Hospital, at Brompton. Their names are Thomas Rogers, I.E., suffering severely, and believed to be blind; George Smith, I.E., much injured from burns; James Goode, R E., seriously injured; Stephen Elliott, R.E., slightly scorched, and suffering from the effects of being blown through the shed James Mackenzie, I.E., much scorched; William Ritchie, I.E., slightly burnt; and Francis Macdonald, I.E., severely injured. The two worst cases are those of Rogers and Smith, but the others were on inquiry on Tuesday proceeding satisfactorily. Many of the men who escaped injuries had their clothes torn, and Sergeant Adams, besides having his clothes partially destroyed, is slightly scorched about tie face.
As soon as possible after the accident Colonel Harnes, C.B., director of the Royal Engineer establishment, directed a board of officers to assemble at Brompton to investigate the cause of the explosion. The officers charged with this duty were Major J. W. Livell, C.B., president; Captain H. Schaw, and Captain W. J. Stuart, of the Royal Engineers. The members of tbe board of inquiry were occupied until late on Monday afternoon in the examination of the sergeant-instructor and the other non-commissioned officers and men who were in the factory at the time of the accident, in order to enable an official report of the occurrence to be forwarded to the Duke of Cambridge. From what was stated to the Court there seems little doubt that the explosion is to be wholly attributed to the incautious manner with which Smith, one of the men most injured, performed the process of ramming. Owing to the north gun shed being removed from the main buildings the barracks, no injury to the barracks occurred from the explosion.
The unfortunate occurrence caused the suspension of all work in the laboratory at the north gun-shed, where the explosion took place, and, from the utter ruin in which the interior of the factory was found after the accident, it will be some time before work of any kind can be resumed in that building by no means suited for the description of the work carried on within it, and which, as its name implies, was never intended to be used as a laboratory for the manufacture of dangerous missiles. The only protection afforded the inmates on the side of the shed is row of paling carried up to the roof, communicating with the outside, to which the public have access, and where the operations of the persons employed can be witnessed by any persons from the exterior. Now that fatal accident has occurred the authorities seem to be aware of the highly improper locality of the laboratory for a large establishment like that of the Royal Engineers at Chatham, and on Tuesday morning Colonel Harness, C.B., after paying a visit to the factory and inspecting the damage caused by the accident, gave positive orders that no portion of the north gun-shed should ever again be used laboratory, and the same time directed that the works should be suspended until a suitable building, in which the dangerous occupations could be carried on, was provided. Two large ranges of buildings are now in course of erection at the Engineer establishment for the requirements of the officers and men, and it is probable that a portion of one of these will be ultimately used for the purpose.
The above account of the accident conveys but a very imperfect description of the nature of the explosion, and, considering the force with which the heaps of hand-grenades and fuses exploded, it was little short of a miracle that there was not a large loss life. At the time of the explosion there were about fifty shells, of various sizes, on the floor of the laboratory, some them being as large as 10- inch; these, fortunately, were not charged, or the result of their explosion would have been most appalling. There were also several hundred hand-grenades and fuses, some charged, and others waiting for that operation to be performed on them. These were scattered about, and it was owing to this fortunate circumstance that the violence of the explosion was much less than it otherwise would have been. So great, however, was the force of the explosion, that nearly every hut in the range of buildings forming the hut-barracks, a short distance from the Engineer establishment was shaken to the foundation, the inmates of most of them rushing out to ascertain the cause. A number of troops of the line were being exercised very near to the north gun-shed at the moment of the accident, and these observing the sides of the shed blown out, threw down their arms and ran away, under the impression that the entire building would blow up. The whole of one side of the laboratory was blown clean away, and through this opening were hurled a sergeant and two sappers into a coal-yard below. After the explosion the laboratory was discovered to be on fire in two or three places, but the engines being soon on the spot, the flames were extinguished. During the whole of Tuesday a body of sappers were engaged in clearing out the interior of the factory and removing the fragments of hand-grenades, fuses, and also the shells there at the time.
The sufferers by the accident, of whom there were seven lying at the Royal Engineer Hospital, are all proceeding favourably, notwithstanding that some are suffering very severely. Those most hurt are Sappers Rogers and Smith, both of them Indian Engineers. Rogers is so much burnt that scarcely a feature can be distinguished, he is also believed to have lost the sight of one if not both his eyes. His is the only case likely to prove fatal. Smith, through whose carelessness the accident is known to have occurred, is much scorched blackened about the face, head, and body, and suffering severely. The others are all progressing towards recovery.
The board of officers, under the presidency of Major Lovell, R.E, ordered to investigate the cause of the accident, concluded their inquiry on Monday night, and a report has since been forwarded to the Duke of Cambridge.

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Offline Leofwine

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Re: Brompton Barracks.
« Reply #65 on: February 07, 2012, 02:02:24 »
Kentish Gazette - Tuesday 15 May 1860

CHATHAM.
The authorities in command at Chatham have decided on placing several hundred of the troops at that garrison under canvass during the present summer, the experience of former years having shown that the men encamped are far more healthy, and the percentage of sick much less, than when the troops are living and sleeping in their close and crowded barrack-rooms. The encampment for the men of the 1st and 2d depot battalions will be formed within the fortifications at Spur battery, near Fort Amherst, were a number large and commodious tents were on Tuesday erected. These will be occupied by the depots now quartered Chatham barracks. The tents for the 3d depot battalion will be pitched near Prince Edward's bastion, adjoining the Hut barracks. According to present arrangements, the troops will go under canvass on the 15th inst. should the weather be favourable, when the troops of the line now quartered at Brompton barracks will remove to Chatham barracks, in order that the former barracks may be occupied exclusively by the Royal Engineers and Royal Artillery, a mounted battery of which, numbering five officers and 240 men, will be sent to Brompton immediately accomodation can be provided for them.
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Offline Leofwine

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Re: Brompton Barracks.
« Reply #64 on: February 07, 2012, 01:01:25 »
Kentish Gazette - Tuesday 06 March 1860

CHATHAM.
A number of beautifully executed maps, plates, and plans of the various incidents connected with the Crimean campaign, have been presented to the non-commissioned officers' library at the Royal Engineers' establishment, by the Government, the sieges and the whole of the operations in which the British forces were engaged being faithfully depicted. The library is also enriched by other presents which have been made by the War office authorities.
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Re: Brompton Barracks.
« Reply #63 on: February 07, 2012, 00:34:34 »
Kentish Gazette - Tuesday 14 February 1860

CHATHAM.
The museum attached to the Royal Engineer establishment at Chatham has just been enriched by a number very interesting specimens firearms of all descriptions, captured in China, which have been deposited in the department devoted to these descriptions of objects. Most of the pieces are of very extraordinary design and character. Two enormous bamboo canes, each measuring upwards of 40 feet in length, which were likewise brought from China, have also been placed in the museum at Brompton barracks.
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Offline Leofwine

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Re: Brompton Barracks.
« Reply #62 on: February 06, 2012, 22:45:46 »
Thanks bromptonboy. I'm never sure with the barracks as there has been so much demolition and rebuilding in there over the years.


Kentish Gazette - Tuesday 10 April 1860

CHATHAM.
According present arrangements, the A troop of the Royal Engineer Train, under the command of Captain R. W. Duff, R.E., with the whole their field equipment and stores, will vacate their winter quarters at Brompton barracks, Chatham, on the 16th instant, and proceed to the camp at Aldershott, where they will be stationed during the summer. The quarters at Brompton barracks now occupied the Royal Engineer Train will be taken possession of by the detachment Royal Engineers, which now numbers 500 men.

(I wonder if the Captain Duff mentioned here is the same man who became Lt.-Col. Duff by the time of the murder of Lieutenant Roper at the Barracks in 1881?)
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