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Author Topic: Cobham  (Read 6379 times)

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merc

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Re: Cobham
« Reply #5 on: May 26, 2009, 22:41:49 »
Quote
At St Thomas' well near Cobham,pilgrims are said to have watered their horses on the way to the shrine of Thomas a Becket at Canterbury.

I wonder if it's a hoy well. Otford and Kemsing haver these )Thmas a Becket's well and St Edith's Well repsectivel;y - botgh are on the Pilgrims Way and perhaps this was a good way to raise seom money locally.
This one near Cobham is next to Watling Street A2,not the pilgrims way though.

Just googled it and found this:

"Near Cobham - a lost well. Was dedicated to St Thomas a Becket, and sited by the western edge of Cobham Park, again associated with Canterbury pilgrims."

Guest

  • Guest
Re: Cobham
« Reply #4 on: May 26, 2009, 21:06:09 »
Quote
At St Thomas' well near Cobham,pilgrims are said to have watered their horses on the way to the shrine of Thomas a Becket at Canterbury.

I wonder if it's a hoy well. Otford and Kemsing haver these )Thmas a Becket's well and St Edith's Well repsectivel;y - botgh are on the Pilgrims Way and perhaps this was a good way to raise seom money locally.

merc

  • Guest
Re: Cobham
« Reply #3 on: May 26, 2009, 20:39:03 »
At St Thomas' well near Cobham,pilgrims are said to have watered their horses on the way to the shrine of Thomas a Becket at Canterbury.
Nearby,in 1947 Coal was discovered.
Cobham Mining Co was formed,some shafts were dug but no worthwhile deposites of coal were found as it was Lignite (a brown coal)
The Company wound up in 1953 and the entrances to the tunnels were colapsed,however,the depressions in the ground can still be seen and are sometimes mistaken for bomb crators.

Allegedly :-\,not far from here in 1825,three wagon loads of human bones,leather and bronze armour were found,possibly the result of a clash between a patrol of Rom
an Soldiers and Nordic raiders in the declining years of the Roman Empire in about 400 AD.
The finds were said to be in very good condition.
The bones were reburied,and the armour was taken to the 4th Lord Darnley at Cobham Hall,But unfortunatly he was not interested and the metal was taken to Gravesend,sold as scrap,and melted down.

merc

  • Guest
Re: Cobham
« Reply #2 on: May 29, 2008, 22:43:36 »
aha ;D

HOWLETS, or Owlets, as it was formerly called, was an antient seat in this parish, which was formerly the inheritance of the family of Isaac, of the adjoining parish of Patrixborne, but how long they continued owners of it, I have not found; but that they had quitted the possession of it before the reign of queen Elizabeth, is very certain, for in the 1st year of that reign, John Dorante, of this parish, who was a good benefactor to the poor of Littleborne, was possessed of it, and his descendant, of the same name, alienated it to Sir Henry Palmer, whose family was originally of Snodland, near Rocherster, whence they branched off to Tottington, in Aylesford, and
to this parish of Bekesborne. (fn. 7) He afterwards resided here, where he died in 1611, and by his will gave it to his son in-law Sir Isaac Sidley, bart. who conveyed his right in it to his brother-in law Sir Henry Palmer, and he about the year 1620, alienated it to Sir Charles Hales, of Thanington. The original of this family of Hales has been already related before, in vol. vi. p. 88, down to Thomas, second son of John Hales, of the Dungeon, one of the barons of the exchequer, who was seated at Thanington, where he died, and was buried in 1583, whose son Sir Charles Hales purchased Howlets as before-mentioned, and removed thither before his death in 1623. (fn. 8) His grandson Sir Robert Hales was created a baronet on July 12, anno 12 Charles II. 1660, during the time of whose grandson Sir Thomas this seat sell down, and the family removed to another house nearer the church in this parish, where they afterwards resided. At length his descendant Sir Philip Hales, bart. in 1787 alienated the scite of it, with
 the gardens and offices remaining, and belonging to it, to Isaac Baugh, esq. who is the present possessor of them, and who having entirely pulled down the old seat, has built for his residence a mansion on these grounds, on the hill, at a small distance from the scite of the antient house, but within the precinct of Well, in Ickham parish.

From: 'Parishes: Bekesborne', The History and Topographical Survey of the County of Kent: Volume 9 (1800), pp. 266-276. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=63562. Date accessed: 29 May 2008.

merc

  • Guest
Cobham
« Reply #1 on: May 29, 2008, 22:32:09 »
Cobham is a lovely North Kent village and packed with history.
As soon as i got there i was asked for directions to a place called Owlettes ??? I thought the person said Howletts at first ;D
Not sure of what the place exactly is as "yet" but i found it as i walked up the road.

Anyway...Some more Cobham pics of a few places...






Charles Dickens sometimes drank here






Ye Olde Bus Stop ;D


St Mary Magdalene, Cobham

Cobham Church is a very old church standing on a hill in the centre of the village. Early in the thirteenth century the de Cobhams began to provide money for rebuilding the existing old church. Of this work only the splendid Chancel dating from 1220 survives plus some superb brasses some 600 years old remain.



 

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