News: “Over the graves of the Druids and under the wreck of Rome,
Rudely but surely they bedded the plinth of the days to come.
Behind the feet of the Legions and before the Norseman’s ire
Rudely but greatly begat they the framing of State and Shire
Rudely but deeply they laboured, and their labour stand till now.
If we trace on ancient headlands the twist of their eight-ox plough.”

-Rudyard Kipling
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Author Topic: Kingsnorth, Ashford  (Read 8021 times)

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ellenkate

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Re: Kingsnorth, Ashford
« Reply #5 on: October 10, 2010, 18:13:00 »

Here is a lovely farming scene at Kingsnorth, which was passed onto us by a distant family member.



Ellenkate

red332001

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Re: Kingsnorth, Ashford
« Reply #4 on: October 09, 2010, 20:40:35 »
I lived in Kingsnorth as a kid before it merged into Ashford. My friends granmother told us that Stumble Wood was used as a camp for Italian pow who worked the land during WW2. There used to be the remains of a building in the form of a large rectangular concrete slab and on the very left hand side looking from the road about 3/4 of the way down were the remains of the cookhouse including a drain or soak away as kids we called it the well. She said they were a very friendly bunch and some stayed in Ashford after the war

Offline kyn

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Re: Kingsnorth, Ashford
« Reply #3 on: October 31, 2009, 20:13:17 »
The church is right on the edge of the village, which is tiny, I'm not suprised you got lost!

Offline Riding With The Angels

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Re: Kingsnorth, Ashford
« Reply #2 on: October 31, 2009, 19:58:26 »
Interesting Kyn. I have to say when I visited the church I was suprised how suddenly rural it felt - after getting lost trying to find it.

Offline kyn

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Kingsnorth, Ashford
« Reply #1 on: October 31, 2009, 19:50:35 »
The village of Kingsnorth in Ashford is believed to have been occupied before the Roman occupation, excavations carried out in the 1990's prior to the building of a new housing estate, named Park Farm, revealed flint tools dating back as far as 28,000 years ago.  At Brisley Farm excavations revealed a late Iron Age or early roman settlement, this also revealed a possible Bronze Age field system.  One of the most important finds during this excavation were two Warriors who had been buried with swords, spears, shields and other items.
Within the Park farm Estate a moat can be found, it surrounds a square of land and is now incorporated into the park area, this was not excavated and has been left undisturbed.  The moat was at the centre of a Roman settlement and had two Roman Roads crossing nearby, one of these roads still exist and the other is remembered by Roman Way, which runs through the estate.  Evidence showed that wooden buildings had been constructed beside this road and were associated with iron working.  Another find in this area was a shrine or temple beside a water-hole that contained 74 coins, mostly from the 2nd century believed to have been left as offerings.  Many other finds were uncovered including a total of around 250 coins a Roman cemetery and Iron Age burial.

The Doomsday Book shows a settlement at Kingsnorth was controlled by the Manor of Wye in 1086, the name Kingsnorth is believed to be from an old English name meaning detached land belonging to a royal estate although it has also been suggested that the name comes from the word 'Kyn', or 'Kin'.  The name has been recorded as Kyngsnode; Kynsnoth, Kyngesnothe and Kingessnode.

The area of Kingsnorth near the church is a conservation area, it incorporates the original village school, Mouse Hall besides the church, the village hall and playing field and other private houses.

The Parish Council was set up on the 4th December 1894, the electors met at the schoolroom to elect the first council, eleven candidates were proposed with seven members being elected by a show of hands.  After this date the election was held annually at the Annual Parish Meeting with each member being elected by a showing of hands until 1936 when a secret ballot was introduced.

Nearby Stumble Wood is rumoured to hold trenches from WWII when troops were billeted to Kingsnorth, these trenches are believed locally to be where the troops slept however it is more likely these are practice trenches.  The troops manned a pillbox at the village school which also had a Light Anti-Aircraft gun installed on site and the tower of the church adjacent to the school was used as an observation post.

The church:
http://www.kenthistoryforum.co.uk/index.php?topic=4425.0

The moat

Mouse Hall

Practice trenches in the trees

Pillbox at the school?

 

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