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Author Topic: *Yawn* Another Bomb!  (Read 38365 times)

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Offline kyn

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Re: *Yawn* Another Bomb!
« Reply #90 on: March 31, 2017, 23:26:28 »

Offline CAT

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Re: *Yawn* Another Bomb!
« Reply #89 on: February 12, 2017, 14:53:24 »
Looking further into inert cannon balls exploding, it would appear this is based around chemical reactors within the iron and the salts from being submerged for many years. This can cause them to super heat and fracturing,  which on a large ball such as this can make quite a bang. However, trapped chemical gases, formed under the high pressure of a deep sea environment, within the iron casting, can form micro pockets that when brought to the surface can be under extreme presume due to the loss of sea depth compression. These are the ones you have to look out for as they will explode. This can cause a chain reaction throughout the casting, causing the ball to explode with an effect similar to that initially intended as an artillery projectile. The fact that this had lain on the beach for at least a fortnight and in fairly shallow water means the chance of it exploding would be fairly slim?

I'm quite interested in the fact that a ball this big appears not to have been a favoured poundage (128lb) of the British, but we're largely used by American coastal defensive pieces known as a Columbaird. If so, what was it doing on an East Kent beach? I'm aware this could have been from a sunken wreck, but does anyone know if we, the British, we're using land based pieces of this size?

Offline HERB COLLECTOR

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Re: *Yawn* Another Bomb!
« Reply #88 on: February 11, 2017, 20:04:24 »
Careful, even solid iron cannonballs can explode if they have been in the sea for some time.
http://io9.gizmodo.com/5651698/why-old-cannonballs-brought-up-from-the-sea-can-still-explode
Don't Let the Devil Ride Chris and Abby

Offline CAT

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Re: *Yawn* Another Bomb!
« Reply #87 on: February 11, 2017, 18:30:01 »
Gladly I didn't have to hit it. The outer concretion had already come off, I assume due to wave action, and was lying close by. The small hammer is largely for scale, it being 10 inches long. Having looked closely at the ball to check there was no fuse, or opening to charge it, I was confident it was solid. I might be slighty carefree, but not damn right stupid. I come across several 'live' artillery pieces, ranging from mid nineteenth-century through to WWII, each year and have had them professionally blown up.

Offline helcion

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Re: *Yawn* Another Bomb!
« Reply #86 on: February 11, 2017, 14:29:08 »
CAT   -

If you hit it hard with that hammer to remove what looks like an outer crust of crud you're a braver man than I,  Gunga Din !

Offline CAT

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Re: *Yawn* Another Bomb!
« Reply #85 on: February 11, 2017, 12:52:15 »
I know this is technically not a bomb, but this is the second I have come across and it almost fits the criteria?

Found on the beach north of Deal, this one is a solid ball of iron measuring nearly 10 inches in diameter and weighing 128 pounds. As this was solid, and not filled with lead shot and gunpowder with a live fuse, I had retrieved this and is sitting in a tub of clean water to rinse the salt from it.

Offline Mickleburgh

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Re: *Yawn* Another Bomb!
« Reply #84 on: January 25, 2017, 09:57:41 »
Gather there was one at Sturry yesterday as well.  Given we are already past the hundred year mark in Flanders it makes you wonder when, if ever, they will be able to declare `all clear`

Offline AlanH

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Re: *Yawn* Another Bomb!
« Reply #83 on: January 24, 2017, 09:09:58 »
I attended Laleham School in Northdown Way Margate in around 1957 and well remember a big boy whose name I can't recall at the mo, being stopped from pulling apart a shell he'd found down on the beach which wasn't far away.
He was trying to get the end cap off apparently when stopped by an reputedly ex commando teacher by the name of Dixon. From memory the workshop was on the bottom floor beneath the boys dormitory.
These relics of the first and last world war are always appearing from all over the UK and no doubt in parts of Europe as well. We used to collect clips of 303 bullets from places down on the beach both at Margate and in Frimley Surrey where I also went to school.
They used to conduct big searches at Burrow Hill School at Frimley to collect ammo boys (not I of course  :) ) used to pinch from the army training grounds based at Camperdown (?) not far across the moors from the school.
Great schools both of them and although I didn't learn much academically I certainly found lots to amuse me.
AlanH.


Offline Lyn L

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Re: *Yawn* Another Bomb!
« Reply #82 on: January 23, 2017, 09:35:57 »
Half our life is spent trying to find something to do with the time we have rushed through life tryi

Offline conan

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To remain ignorant of what happened before you were born is to remain a child......Cicero

Offline CAT

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Re: *Yawn* Another Bomb!
« Reply #80 on: April 22, 2016, 14:05:34 »
I'm thinking someone has it in for me?

Another two lying on the sands following a rough high tide with another (poss. two fused together) all very close to one another. I think these are earlier as they look cruder in their design? There is the possibility they could be as early as mid nineteenth-century?

Offline CAT

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Re: *Yawn* Another Bomb!
« Reply #79 on: April 17, 2016, 19:56:12 »
Many thanks conan. I'm slowly going through the entire document and I think you are right regards the timing mechanism? I was unaware of the wide diversity of these things. I was informed at the time that the 'pointed end' (again not a technical term) originally possessed a cap of softer metal (aluminium?) that would distort on impact and initiate the timing mechanism?

Offline conan

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Re: *Yawn* Another Bomb!
« Reply #78 on: April 16, 2016, 18:43:34 »
Just found this, looks like it had a time fuse. Go to section 15 of the link, the middle one numbered 221, looks the same as the one you have minus the pointy bit (technical term)

http://nigelef.tripod.com/ammo.htm
To remain ignorant of what happened before you were born is to remain a child......Cicero

Offline CAT

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Re: *Yawn* Another Bomb!
« Reply #77 on: April 16, 2016, 16:21:53 »
I was hoping with the aid of the pics that I included that someone out there may have been able to tell me a little more regards what it actually was I found? At the time some said it was an artillery shell, a naval shell, an anti aircraft shell and dated from between WWI and the 1970's. Even the bomb disposal team only commented on it being a HE artillery projectile. Any help would be gratefully received?

Thanks in advance.

Offline CAT

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Re: *Yawn* Another Bomb!
« Reply #76 on: April 12, 2016, 19:54:47 »
Yawn again, but this time a bit more local.

Whilst walking the beach at Sandwich Bay about three weeks ago I spotted this heavily encrusted 'thing' lying on the exposed sands at low tide. Being about 15 inches long and roughly 4 inches in diameter, my first response was a corroded iron 'thing' from a ship wreck known to litter this section of coast. A dislodging of some of the concretion revealed the 'pointed' end to possess a timing ring (not the technical tern I know) separated into 1 - 22 cm divisions around the inner ring and with No. 221 I RC 41 visible around the outer ring. Following a charade with the local police (inexperience, isolated location and poor understanding of the protocol with contacting the army bomb disposal team at Shorncliffe) meant it was left on the beach overnight. A visit the following morning rediscovered it lying on the beach with dogs and owners tripping over it. A second call to the coast guard alerted the Navy Bomb Disposal Team from Portsmouth, who deal with any coastal munitions, who appeared pronto and blew it up.

A fun day was had by all.     

 

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